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College and Career Readiness

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Course Descriptions


ACCT 120: Small Business Accounting

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course provides an introduction to general financial accounting principles and their application for small businesses. Topics will include the accounting cycle, payroll, cash, receivables, payables, inventory, depreciation, and financial statement preparation. Practical application of accounting principles will be emphasized throughout the course. 3 credit hours

ACCT 130: Computerized Accounting Applications

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACCT 120 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099 and ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course will emphasize the use of general ledger accounting software to record accounting transactions and the design and development of a comprehensive computerized accounting information system. 3 credit hours

ACCT 140: Small Business Taxes

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will introduce the fundamentals of federal and state income tax preparation and reporting requirements for individuals and various types of small businesses. In addition, payroll tax and sales tax reporting will also be introduced. 3 credit hours

ACCT 200: Financial Accounting

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at MATH 106 or higher OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099 and ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Sophomore standing recommended. This course offers students a full semester of financial accounting. It presents accounting as an information system that produces summary financial statements, primarily for users external to a business or other enterprise. The emphasis of the course is on understanding and applying basic accounting principles and other concepts that guide the reporting of the effect of common business transactions. How to analyze and interpret historical financial statements as well, and the limitations of using these in making business decisions is included. The primary content emphasis will be accounting for operating activities, current assets and liabilities, long-term assets and liabilities, corporations, cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - BUS 903

ACCT 201: Managerial Accounting

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACCT 200
AND
-Completion of MATH 106 or MATH 109 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course offers students a full semester of managerial accounting. It presents accounting as a system of producing information for use in internally managing a business. The course emphasizes the identification, accumulation, and interpretation of information for planning, controlling, and evaluating the performance of the separate components of a business. Included is the identification and measurement of the cost of producing goods or services and how to analyze and control these costs. Decision models commonly used in making specific short-term and long-term business decisions are also included. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - BUS 904

ACSM 101: Introduction to Computers

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Introduction to Computers will introduce students from any major to the essential computing concepts including computer hardware and software, in addition to the Internet and World Wide Web. Students will work with a current operating system in addition to software packages used in business and industry. Ethical and social issues will be emphasized. Keyboarding ability recommended. Credit will not be awarded for students who have taken ACSM 102 and ACSM 103 combined. 3 credit hours

ACSM 102: Introduction to Computer Concepts

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Introduction to Computer Concepts will introduce students from any major to the essential computing concepts including computer hardware and software in addition to the Internet and World Wide Web. Social and ethical issues will be emphasized. ACSM 102 and ACSM 103 combined are equivalent to, and should transfer as, ACSM 101. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken ACSM 101. 1.5 credit hours

ACSM 103: Introduction to Computer Skills

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Introduction to Computer Skills will introduce students from any major to the fundamental use of application software. Students will work with an operating system in addition to the software packages used in business and industry. Keyboarding ability recommended. ACSM 102 and ACSM 103 combined are equivalent to, and should transfer as, ACSM 101. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken ACSM 101. 1.5 credit hours

ACSM 125: Powerpoint

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 101 or CSCI 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099 and ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a comprehensive exploration of designing and creating presentations. Students will learn the key concepts and techniques of Microsoft PowerPoint to create professional presentations. Keyboarding skills are recommended. 1 credit hour

ACSM 135: Spreadsheets - Excel for Windows

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 120 OR
-Passing ACSM 120 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099/101 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Students of this course will develop a working knowledge of the basic and advanced capabilities of the Windows-based spreadsheet software program Microsoft Excel. The course is taught in an exercise-oriented approach, which will prepare students to develop spreadsheet solutions for accounting, financial analysis, and many other business planning situations. Topics explored in this course include: spreadsheet design, creation of graphs, templates, linking of files, database management, and macros. 3 credit hours

ACSM 136: Excel Level I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 101 or CSCI 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will introduce students to the use of spreadsheets through Microsoft Excel. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating, editing, formatting and enhancing worksheets and charts, and adding visual interest to workbooks. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken ACSM 135. 1 credit hour

ACSM 137: Excel Level II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 136
AND
-Placement at ENGL 094 or higher
AND
-Placement at college level reading

If placed at two or more developmental levels, concurrent enrollment in or completion of GENS 105 is also required.

This course will build on the skills developed in ACSM 136 with emphasis on creating and using advanced functions and formulas, and working with tables and data features. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and modifying charts, using conditional formatting rules and custom number formats, filtering and sorting data, creating PivotTables and customizing Sparklines. 1 credit hour

ACSM 138: Excel Level III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 137
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This final course in the Excel series will focus on using data analysis features to make good business decisions. Students will receive hands-on instruction in using auditing tools, creating assumptions and performing What-If analysis, protecting and sharing workbooks, automating tasks using macros, creating custom templates, and importing, exporting and distributing data. 1 credit hour

ACSM 145: Database Applications - Access

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 120 OR
-Successfully passing the ACSM 120 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099/101 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will introduce students from any discipline to the major components of database management systems with a thorough coverage of database use and applications. Students will use the database to create files and business reports, including file design and maintenance, report generation, and advanced concepts. 3 credit hours

ACSM 146: Access Level I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 101 or CSCI 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will introduce students to the major components of database management systems using Microsoft Access. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and managing tables, queries, forms, and reports, and will develop an understanding of the relationships between these functions. 1 credit hour

ACSM 147: Access Level II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 137
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will build on the skills developed in ACSM 146, with emphasis on data storage and retrieval measures. Students will receive hands-on instruction in using data filters, forms and advanced query techniques, as well as creating relationships between tables and lookup fields. 1 credit hour

ACSM 148: Access Level III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 147
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This final course in the Access series will focus on advanced form techniques and managing a database. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and modifying custom forms, reports and macros, importing data and linking to tables in another database. 1 credit hour

ACSM 155: Word Processing - MS Word

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 120 OR
-Successfully passing the ACSM 120 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099/101 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Students of this course will develop a working knowledge of the basic and advanced capabilities of the Windows-based word processing program Microsoft Word. The course is taught in an exercise-oriented approach, which will prepare students to produce a variety of documents, from one-page letters to multiple page newsletters and brochures. Word processing features including formatting, printing, merging, desktop publishing, and use of templates will be explored during the semester. 3 credit hours

ACSM 156: Word Level I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 101 or CSCI 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will introduce students to the basics of word processing software using Microsoft Word. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating, formatting, and editing Word documents, and working with envelopes and labels. 1 credit hour

ACSM 157: Word Level II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 156
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will build on the skills developed in ACSM 156, with emphasis on enhancing Word documents. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating tables and charts, inserting images, tracing changes and comments, merging documents, and managing a data source. 1 credit hour

ACSM 158: Word Level III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 157
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This final course in the Microsoft® Word series will focus on using advanced techniques to manage documents. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and customizing Themes and Styles, inserting references, creating indexes, forms and outlines, and working with macros. 1 credit hour

ACSM 296: Topics in Microcomputer Applications

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will offer students an opportunity to study a special topic or current issue which is unique and infrequently offered as part of their program. The course is intended to familiarize students with some of the latest microcomputer applications. The topic will be announced in the schedule book. Because topics studied will change each semester, ACSM 296 may be repeated up to a total of 6 credit hours. 1-6 credit hours

AETP 51: Pre-College Reading I

AETP 051 covers the fundamentals of reading and vocabulary acquisition in an academic environment. Course objectives are focused on improving reading comprehension, acquisition of general background knowledge, and development of vocabulary learning strategies. Other issues specific to reading for academic purposes will be covered as needed. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 52: Pre-College Writing I

AETP 052 covers the fundamentals of writing for academic purposes. Course objectives include introduction to pre-writing skills, development of the paragraph, and improving sentence-level grammar. Other issues specific to writing in an academic setting will be covered as needed. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 54: Pre-College Communication I

AETP 054 covers the fundamentals of listening and speaking in an academic environment. Course objectives include introduction to note-taking, development of group work skills, and development of basic oral presentation skills. Other issues specific to academic communication will be covered as needed. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 60: Intermediate Practical Reading

AETP 060 provides a combination of one-on-one, small group and/or computer-based instruction for Low Intermediate Adult Basic Education students. The course is focused on evidence-based reading instruction and includes comprehensive assessment. AETP 060 may be taken concurrently with other ABE classes, but concurrent enrollment is not required. 1-12 credit hours

AETP 61: Pre-College Reading II

AETP 061 reinforces reading and vocabulary acquisition skills. Course objectives include improved reading comprehension and fluency, acquisition of general background knowledge, and development of vocabulary learning strategies. Other issues specific to reading for academic purposes will be covered as needed. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 62: Pre-College Writing II

AETP 062 reinforces skills needed in writing for academic purposes. Course objectives include application of the writing process, development of the academic essay, and introduction to audience and rhetoric. Other issues specific to writing in an academic setting will be covered as needed. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 64: Pre-College Communication II

AETP 064 reinforces listening and speaking skills needed in an academic environment. Course objectives include exploration of communication strategies, development of presentation skills, and introduction to active listening and engagement. Other issues specific to academic communication will be covered as needed. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 71: Pre-College Reading III

AETP 071 covers intermediate instruction in reading and vocabulary acquisition. Course objectives include the application of critical thinking skills in academic reading. The course prepares students for success in the post-secondary academic environment. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 72: Pre-College Writing III

AETP 072 covers intermediate instruction in writing for academic purposes. Course objectives include improved awareness of audience and purpose, application of research in the academic essay, and introduction to academic integrity and plagiarism. Other issues specific to writing in an academic setting will be covered as needed. This course prepares students for success in the post-secondary academic environment. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 74: Pre-College Communication III

AETP 074 covers intermediate instruction in academic communication. Course objectives include strategies for asking questions in class and during professor office hours, the application of technology in class presentations, and increased awareness of critical listening and thinking. Other issues specific to academic communication will be covered as needed. The course prepares students for success in the post-secondary academic environment. 3-6 credit hours

AETP 80: Advanced Practical Reading

AETP 080 provides a combination of one-on-one, small group and/or computer-based instruction for High Intermediate Adult Basic Education students. The course is focused on evidence-based reading instruction and includes comprehensive assessment. AETP 080 may be taken concurrently with other ABE classes, but concurrent enrollment is not required. 1-12 credit hours

AETP 81: Advanced Academic Skills

AETP 081 covers advanced instruction in reading, writing and communication skills needed for success in post-secondary education. Course objectives include mastery of advanced academic skills including application of research in the academic essay, understanding of academic integrity and plagiarism and delivery of advanced presentations. Other topics specific to college transition will be covered as needed. 1-6 credit hours

AETP 89: College Connections

AETP 089 focuses on preparing students for college life. Students will learn vocabulary, concepts and communication strategies for navigating the post-secondary education system. Students will become acquainted with enrollment and assessments processes, as well as identify career and educational pathways. Specific attention will be given to admission, placement, advising and financial aid processes at Heartland Community College. The course prepares students for success in the post-secondary environment. 1-6 credit hours

AGRI 110: Introductory Agricultural Economics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Fundamental principles of economics applied to agriculture, agriculture finance, prices, taxation, marketing, and land use. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - AG 901

AGRI 120: Introductory Horticulture

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides a general introduction to the principles of plant growth and development as they apply to the wide range of horticultural crops and the industries related to production, marketing and utilization of horticultural crops. This course is part of a special program with the College of ACES at the University of Illinois and will be taught by a University of Illinois instructor. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - AG 905

AGRI 150: Principles of Agronomy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to basic agronomy revolving around crop production in the Midwest. The subject matter presented will provide an overview of major aspects of plant and soil management, pest control, and soil and water conservation issues and practices. Students will gain a basic knowledge of plant growth and development and how soil, environment conditions, and crop pests can affect growth and development. This course is part of a special program with the College of ACES at the University of Illinois and will be taught by a University of Illinois instructor. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - AG 903

AGRI 157: Soil Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHEM 120 or CHEM 161
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the basic principles of soils as they exist and interact in the environment. The course emphasizes soil as a natural body in nature; its formation, classification, chemical, and physical properties. Students develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control soil processes and properties. Whenever necessary, students are reintroduced to the relevant science and then shown how to apply these concepts to soils. Introductory Soils is designed to be equally useful to the non-agricultural production students, including those studying plant science, ecology, and environmental science, and to students in curricula such as agronomy, crop science, soil science, horticulture, and forestry. This course is part of a special program with the College of ACES at the University of Illinois and will be taught by a University of Illinois instructor. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - AG 904

AGRI 170: Introduction to Animal Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is a survey course covering topics such as beef and dairy cattle, companion animals, horses, poultry, sheep, and swine. This course will include the importance of product technology and the basic principles of nutrition, genetics, physiology, reproduction, microbiology, and behavior as they apply to breeding, selection, feeding, and management. This course is part of a special program with the College of ACES at the University of Illinois and will be taught by a University of Illinois instructor. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - AG 902

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

ANTH 101: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to human culture encompassing social organization, the arts, technology, economics, religion, language, family, and identity, as well as the effects of globalization. Drawing on examples from around the world and close to home, students will explore the broad variation of cultural expression, as well as the common characteristics shared by all. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S1 901N

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

ANTH 102: Introduction to General Anthropology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introductory survey of Anthropology and its subfields (cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics). Students will study the nature of humans and their development in relationship to their physical and social environment today and in the past. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S1 901N

ART 102: Two-Dimensional Design

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ART 104 recommended. This studio art course serves as a foundation course that explores the fundamentals of the formal systems of visual organization through two-dimensional design principles and theories. Students will be using a variety of media to create projects that reflect the fundamental two-dimensional design concepts. 3 credit hours

ART 103: 3D Design: Introduction To Sculpture

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

3-D Design: Intro to Sculpture is a foundation art-studio course which explores design elements, principles, and theories as applied to the making of sculpture. A variety of materials, hand tools, and hands-on processes will be employed to create three-dimensional art objects. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 104: Drawing I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An introduction to drawing principles and techniques. Covers the fundamental concepts of drawing, including a study of line, form, space, value and composition, utilizing a variety of media, such as pencil, pen, conte, chalk, and other tools. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 105: Ceramics I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An exploratory course designed to introduce students to the basic sculptural techniques of three-dimensional clay design and clay glazing. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 106: Painting I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Prerequisite: ART 104 recommended. An introduction to basic painting techniques and color principles applied to the exploration of oil and/or acrylic painting media. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 140: Introduction to Water Color and Pastel

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An exploratory course using transparent water color and pastel, which introduces color theory and practice, formal compositional principles, and painting/drawing techniques appropriate to these media. Subject matter will include still life, landscape, portraiture, and figure study. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 145: Sculpture I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 103
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Sculpture I is a studio course introducing basic sculptural processes, materials, and tools, including additive, subtractive, and substitution methods. Shop safety and aesthetic issues, both modern and historical, will be emphasized. 3 credit hours

IAI Fine Arts

ART 150: Understanding Art

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

ART 150 is designed to provide an understanding of the role of art in our culture and in contemporary life. This course utilizes art works from all cultures and periods to establish basic language of art and the principles of aesthetic organization. Information regarding the artist’s tools, materials, exhibition spaces and the art market will be studied to further illustrate the use of art in our world. Not intended for art majors. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F2 900

ART 154: Drawing II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 104
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Drawing II is a studio course designed to build and refine the visual explorations begun in Basic Drawing. In this course students will continue to explore new media, to develop their perceptual skills and explore compositional devices to enhance expressive and conceptual capabilities. This course includes vocabulary development, critical analysis activities, and reference to historic models of drawing. 3 credit hours

ART 160: Illustration

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 104 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Illustration is a studio art course that explores the fundamental technical and conceptual skills of illustration through familiarizing students to the principal areas within the field which are commercial, editorial, medical, and book illustration. This class uses a variety of media such as wet and dry drawing media and digital imaging. 3 credit hours

ART 180: Beginning Photography

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher

Fundamentals of black and white still photography. Historical development of the medium. The role of photography in contemporary visual expression, including contributions from diverse cultures. The course emphasizes photographic seeing, camera operation, use of aperture and shutter settings for aesthetic and sensitometric control, film processing, printing, use of natural light for personal expression and communication, and appropriate instruction in the health and safety issues relative to the methods of the course and the materials being used. Students will need to provide their own 35mm camera equipped with manual capabilities to change lens opening and shutter speeds. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 190: Digital Photography and Imaging I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is an introduction to digital photography and digital imaging processes, emphasizing photographic seeing, camera operation, use of aperture and shutter settings for aesthetic and sensitometric control, digital printing, and use of natural light for personal expression and communication. Students are required to acquire the principles for expressive communication; operational knowledge for Adobe Photoshop for scanning, manipulating, printing, and web publishing; and the skills in a variety of outputs for both fine art and commercial applications. Students are required to explore the "digital darkroom", using both traditional photographic materials and digital input, and to survey photography’s role in society and culture, including the evolution of various photographic genres and the contributions to the development of digital photography by people of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Students need to provide their own 35mm camera, digital or film, equipped with manual capabilities to change the lens opening and shutter speeds. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

IAI Fine Arts

ART 195: History of Photography

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The history of still photography from the earliest investigations of the camera obscura to 21st Century electronic imaging. Emphasis on the role of photographs as a social and cultural force and on our artistic heritage of camera work. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F2 904

ART 204: Life Drawing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 104 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

A continuation of ART 104 and ART 154, with emphasis on drawing the figure to develop a sense of proportion, structure, gesture, movement, and composition in the various media. This course will introduce a visual vocabulary and provide group experiences, as well as foundations both technical and aesthetic. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 205: Ceramics II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 105
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Development of technical ceramic skills, including wheel work, sculpture, clay body, and clay glazing. Exploration of past and present ceramic forms. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 206: Painting II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 106
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

A continuation of ART 106, with an increased emphasis on painting the human figure, portraiture, landscape painting, general composition, and the continued exploration of the formal and technical elements of painting in various opaque mediums. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

IAI Fine Arts

ART 211: Art History I: Prehistoric to Late Gothic

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A study of the principal achievements in painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts from prehistoric times to the late Gothic period, including the art of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome, the Byzantine world, the Islamic world, and Europe during the Early Christian, Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic periods. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F2 901

IAI Fine Arts

ART 212: Art History II: Renaissance to Modern

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A study of the principal achievements in painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts from the Renaissance to the twentieth century, including art of the proto-Renaissance, the High Renaissance, Mannerism, the Baroque and Rococco periods, Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism and related movements, Dadaism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and the diverse movements from 1945 to the present. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F2 902

ART 214: Art History III: Modern Art

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A history of modernism in art from the French Revolution to the present with emphasis on contemporary issues. 3 credit hours

ART 231: Graphic Design I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 104 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

Completion of DMED 120 recommended. An introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of graphic design, including techniques, processes, terminology, and basic compositional and conceptual skills. This course provides a study of the principles and methods of combining several elements to design images that communicate information effectively. Emphasis on projects which use design elements, typography, illustrations, and technology to create effective messages. An emphasis is placed on computerized design. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 241: Graphic Design II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 231 and ART 102 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This advanced course builds on skills acquired in Graphic Design I; basic principles, terminology, guidelines, methods and systems necessary to solve graphic design problems. Greater emphasis will be placed on the integration of typography and image. Students will study the creation and use of communication methodology, as well grid usage and other layout devices such as composition, visual hierarchy, content development, scale, contrast and pattern. Students will build on their use of the Adobe Creative Suite (InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop). 3 credit hours

ART 280: Photography II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 180
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Further technical development in black and white photography. This course emphasizes the control of available light through use of tripods and push-processing; attributes of various films and appropriate chemistry for each; graded fiber papers; introduction to sensitometry; specialized developing and printing techniques; enhancing personal photographic expression; digital manipulation of the photographic image; and instruction in the health and safety issues relative to the methods of the course and the materials being used. Students will need to provide their own 35mm camera equipped with manual capabilities to change lens opening and shutter speeds. This course meets 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

ART 290: Photography III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 180 and ART 280
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to further technical and aesthetic development in black and white photography beyond the Photo I and II course work. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a personal body of photographic work while demonstrating refined technical virtuosity. Students will need to provide their own 35mm camera equipped with a manual override option. This course meets 4 hours for 2 hours credit. 2 credit hours

ART 291: Digital Photography & Imaging II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 190 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a further exploration of digital photography and digital imaging processes, involving a deeper understanding of the technical and aesthetic issues of digitally created images. The emphasis of this course is personal creative expression in relation to artistic practice. In addition, we will study photography’s role in society and culture, including the evolution of various photographic genre and the contributions to the development of digital photography by people of diverse ethnic and cultural background. Evaluation includes formal group critique of images in addition to individual critiques. Students need to provide their own 35mm camera, digital or film, equipped with manual capabilities to change the lens opening and shutter speeds. 3 credit hours

ART 296: Special Topics in Art

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 102 and ART 231
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an advanced course in art, with variable content that is focused on research, theory, (classroom) and/or creation of work (studio) in a particular area of art. Readings will center on current developments in the study of art and may have an interdisciplinary, social, environmental and/or critical perspective. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, ART 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits toward graduation. 1-3 credit hours

IAI Physical Sciences

ASTR 121: Introduction to Astronomy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is an introductory course in astronomy intended for students who desire a physical science understanding of topics such as: the earth as a planet, the sun and the solar system, stellar systems, stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology. Laboratory activities supplement the lecture material, and may include evening astronomical observing. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 906L

BIOL 99: Biology for Health Careers

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093 or higher OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Topics reviewed in this course will include an introduction to scientific methods and terminology, fundamentals of chemistry and biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics. This course is intended for pre-nursing and allied health students who need a review of biology prior to entering more advanced life science courses in their programs. This course may be used as a pre-requisite to BIOL 181 and BIOL 191. It may not be used to fulfill any part of HCC’s general education science requirement for graduation. Students who have completed BIOL 161 or who plan to major in biology should not enroll in this course. 2 credit hours

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 114: Contemporary Biology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at college level math
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

BIOL 114 will introduce students to a broad range of biological principles, including organization, structure and function, heredity, evolution, and ecology. Students will demonstrate how their knowledge in biology is relevant to them, their community, and their world. Students will use scientific evidence as the basis for their arguments. Students will improve their skills in relaying biological information to peers and to others. In addition, students will leave with a better understanding of scientific views that differ from their own. The laboratory component will emphasize scientific inquiry and use of knowledge in problem solving. This course is intended for students who are not pursuing a science career. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 900L

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 116: Genetics and Society

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math OR
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduction to basic genetic principles and to contemporary issues in biotechnology. Addresses the ethical, political, and social implications of biological advances in the area of genetics. Life science lab credit can be obtained by concurrent or subsequent enrollment in BIOL 117. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 906

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 117: Genetics and Society Lab

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 116
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A laboratory course designed to enhance and expand the student’s understanding of concepts covered in BIOL 116. 2 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 906L

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 121: Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math OR
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Basic structure and function of the human body on the cellular, tissue, and organ system levels will be covered in this course. This course explores both normal and pathologic conditions. Lab exercises include human models and preserved animal specimens. (This course cannot be used for credit in programs requiring BIOL 181 and BIOL 182). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 904L

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 131: Plants and Society

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This general education course emphasizes scientific inquiry using plants as the study organism. Concepts covered include cell and molecular biology, plant structure and function, plant genetics, classification, evolution and ecology. The importance of plants in human society will be an ongoing theme throughout the course. The laboratory exercises will make extensive use of plant models, living and preserved plant specimens, and wet mount and prepared slides. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 901L

BIOL 132: Animals and Society

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This general education course emphasizes scientific inquiry using animals as the study organism. Concepts covered include cell and molecular biology, animal structure and function, animal genetics, classification, evolution and ecology. The importance of animals in human society will be an ongoing theme throughout the course. The laboratory exercises will make extensive use of animal models, living and preserved animal specimens and wet mount and prepared slides. 4 credit hours

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 140: Evolution: Big Bang to Biotechnology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is intended for those not majoring in science. The course explores the broad outlines of evolution, focusing on past and ongoing changes in the universe and life on Earth, as they are understood from a scientific perspective. It includes the study of the origin and evolution of the universe, the formation and development of the solar system and Earth, and the origin and evolution of life. Major emphasis is given to the evolution of life as deduced by evidence from the fossil record and from comparisons among living species. Practical applications of evolutionary theory in medicine, sociology and other fields of study are also explored. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 907

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 161: Principles of Biology I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at MATH 106 or higher OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

BIOL 161 is one semester of a first year, general biology course for students who plan to pursue science careers. Students question and analyze concepts related to cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, and evolution. Students apply their knowledge to their life and the world around them. Students improve collaboration skills as they work with peers to solve different problems. The laboratory component emphasizes data collection and analysis. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 910L
IAI Major Code - BIO 910

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 162: Principles of Biology II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 161 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math OR
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

BIOL 162 is one semester of a first year, general biology course for students who plan to pursue science careers. Students question and analyze concepts related to comparative animal biology, botany, and ecology. Students apply their knowledge to their life and the world around them. Students complete projects to demonstrate responsibility to the community and global environment. Students improve collaboration skills as they work with peers to solve different problems. The laboratory component emphasizes animal dissection and data collection and analysis. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 910L
IAI Major Code - BIO 910

IAI Life Sciences

BIOL 181: Anatomy and Physiology I

Prerequisite(s):
-High school or college level biology course within the last five years OR
-Completion of BIOL 099 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Placement at college level math
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course is the first in a two semester sequence dealing with the structure and function of the human body that begins with the biochemical, cellular and tissue levels of organization, homeostasis and feedback loops. Information from all levels of biological organization is presented for the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. The course explores both the normal and pathologic conditions. The laboratory exercises use human models and preserved animal specimens. (BIOL 182 completes the sequence). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - L1 904L

BIOL 182: Anatomy & Physiology II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 181 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Placement at college level math
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course is the second in a two semester sequence dealing with the structure and function of the human body that includes excretion and fluid balance, human development, metabolism and nutrition. Information from all levels of biological organization is presented for the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. This course explores both the normal and pathologic conditions. The laboratory exercises use human models and preserved animal specimens. (BIOL 182 completes the sequence begun in BIOL 181). 4 credit hours

BIOL 191: Introductory Microbiology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 121, BIOL 161, or BIOL 181
AND
-Placement at college level math
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

Completion of college level chemistry course recommended. This course explores the nature and diversity of microorganisms. Both beneficial and detrimental interrelationships between microbes, other organisms, and the environment are examined. Two weekly laboratory sessions consist of practical and investigative studies. 4 credit hours

BIOL 297: Independent Study In Biology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Completion of a college level biology course
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive work in an area of the life sciences of special interest to the student. Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive written report. 1-2 credit hours

BUSN 108: Personal Finance

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides the background and specific skills necessary for effective personal financial decision making. Students will learn to understand, mathematically analyze, and evaluate financial products and strategies. This course emphasizes active decision making. As students learn the basic concepts, they will develop personal financial goals, devise plans for attaining them, and begin the implementation of strategies leading to financial security and independence. 3 credit hours

BUSN 110: Introduction to Business

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on clarifying the complexities of the business world while enhancing students’ skills in critical thinking, problem solving, diversity, multiculturalism, and communication; thus providing them with necessary tools for business success. Within a framework of professionalism, ethical decision making, responsibility, and the use of technology, students will assess the global, economic, social, technological, and political environments impacting business. In addition, students will examine the essential elements of organizational structure, marketing, management, accounting, and financial decision making. 3 credit hours

BUSN 115: Business Communications

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed to enable students to communicate appropriately and effectively in a business setting. This course provides an introduction to principles of business writing, effective language use, and a review of oral and written communication skills. We will demonstrate a direct relationship between the course material and the effect the material will have on the students’ personal and professional lives. Topics will include the principles of business writing, effective language use, oral and written communication skills, listening, and business presentations. 3 credit hours

BUSN 130: Computer Applications in Business

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the use of Office suite application tools to support effective business decision-making. Students are introduced to concepts and develop skills in word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and Internet applications. Students will use critical thinking and problem solving skills to develop integrated solutions to business cases that focus on improving management productivity. Keyboarding ability is recommended. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - BUS 902

BUSN 145: Employment Success Strategies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Securing an employment position and keeping it is the main goal in employment success. Topics and strategies include the job search process, effective resume writing, interviewing skills, professionalism and developing a positive work ethic. Students will create a job packet that includes essential job search documents. 1 credit hour

BUSN 150: Customer Relations

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course involves all phases of general office work, including the values and attitudes necessary for successful interaction with co-workers and clientele/customers served. Presented in a workshop/seminar mode with simulation exercises, the course will focus on verbal and non-verbal communication including effective listening and telephone skills; the attitudes, values and practices of different cultures, races and ethnic groups; and interpersonal relationships, including tolerance of others; team processes; and dealing with difficult people. 1 credit hour

BUSN 170: Supervision

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed to explore the leadership tools and human relation skills needed to function effectively as a supervisor. Topics discussed in this course include: leadership roles and qualities, communication skills, human relation skills, organizational dynamics, motivation, diversity in the workforce, quality principles and processes, conflict resolution, and legal issues in supervision. 3 credit hours

BUSN 210: Legal Environment of Business

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BUSN 110 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides students with fundamental knowledge concerning a series of critical legal and regulatory issues that affect business. The following areas of law will be the major focus of the course: governmental regulation of business, securities law, contract law, common law, international law, consumer protection law, employment law, and environmental law. 3 credit hours

BUSN 220: Principles of Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BUSN 110 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This management course is designed to introduce students to the role of various levels of management in public and private sector organizations. Emphasis is placed on the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling in a dynamic global environment. 3 credit hours

BUSN 225: Introduction to Sport Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed for students entering the sport and physical education profession where it is critical to understand the theory and practice of ethical management principles in sport/fitness organizations. These principles are applied to interscholastic, intercollegiate, international, and professional organizations along with the health/fitness and community recreation industries. 3 credit hours

BUSN 226: Introduction to Sports Marketing

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to provide an overview of sports marketing principles to students. The following topics will be examined: current issues, theories, and research in sports marketing, promotion, marketing mix, consumer behavior, and relationship marketing. 3 credit hours

BUSN 230: Principles of Marketing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BUSN 110 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to introduce students to an overview of marketing principles. The following topics will be examined: market structure, marketing cost and efficiency, public and private regulation, and development of marketing programs including decisions involving products, price, promotion, and physical distribution. 3 credit hours

BUSN 250: Small Business Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BUSN 110 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to the startup and operation of a small business. Students will explore the steps and research needed to develop a complete business plan, which integrates assessment of business opportunities and the development of operating plans. 3 credit hours

BUSN 296: Topics in Business

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will offer students an opportunity to study a special topic or current issue of special interest in business and industry. The topic will be announced in the schedule book. Because topics studied will change each semester, BUSN 296 may be repeated up to a total of 6 credit hours. 1-6 credit hours

BUSN 299: Internship in Business and ACSM

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of 75% of program requirements
AND
-Culmulative GPA of 3.0 or higher at the time of application for internship
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course provides supervised field experiences in a variety of settings that are related to Business and Applied Computer Science. Such settings include educational institutions, governmental organizations, businesses, and health care agencies. Students work at least five hours a week (a total of 75 hours a semester equals one internship credit hour), gaining practical skills and experience in a setting which will utilize business theories and/or applied computer science skills. 1-6 credit hours

CAD 101: Introduction to AutoCAD

Prerequisite(s):
-Concurrent enrollment in, or completion of, TECH 112 or TECH 114 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Introduction to AutoCAD covers basic AutoCAD commands and techniques using assorted applications, including mechanical, architectural, and possibly others. This course will provide an introduction to the use of AutoCAD software. 3 credit hours

CAD 110: CAD Software Applications

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CAD 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

CAD Software Applications covers the basic use of a variety of CAD software packages. Included may be AutoCAD inventor, AutoCAD Revit, Google Sketchup and other packages as the industry dictates. Topics included will be the use of the 3D coordinate system, element constraints, advanced template design, interaction between CAD programs, basic 3D drawings, assembly drawings, and creation of presentations and animations. 3 credit hours

CAD 224: Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CAD 110
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing focuses on applying geometric dimensioning and tolerancing principles in product design. Topics include the standard definitions, print designation, datum reference frame, and tolerances of location, form, profile, orientation and runout. Advanced concepts include a study of bonus tolerances, virtual conditions and datum references. 3 credit hours

CAD 234: Commercial Architecture

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CAD 110
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

CAD 234 is an advanced course in the practices used in the field of architecture when creating working drawings for the small commercial building and construction industry. Topics include a basic study of steel detailing, concrete structures, heating and air conditioning representation and typical construction methods. The course incorporates sketching and computer aided drafting software to create the plans for a small commercial building. 3 credit hours

CAD 235: Residential Architecture

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CAD 110
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Residential Architecture is an introductory course in practices used in the field of architecture when creating working drawings for the residential construction industry. The course incorporates sketching and computer aided drafting software to create floor plan layouts, various house sections, elevations, and other details of a typical residence. Residential Architecture will be taught using AutoCAD Revit, additional AutoCAD software, Google Sketchup, and other packages as the industry dictates. 3 credit hours

CHEM 99: Preparatory College Chemistry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093 OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is a course designed to prepare a student to take either CHEM 120 or CHEM 161. Students who have not completed a high school chemistry course within the last five years will be required to take CHEM 099 before taking CHEM 161. Those with a weak background in the subject should strongly consider taking CHEM 099 first before enrolling in CHEM 120 or CHEM 161. Topics covered include Significant Figures, Dimensional Analysis, the Periodic Table, Nomenclature, Chemical Reactions & Quantities, and more. 2 credit hours

CHEM 110: Chemistry of CSI: Forensic Chemistry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093 OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to chemistry using forensic science as the primary theme. Topics include the scientific method, evidence collection, atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, properties of solutions, drug chemistry, arson investigation, explosives, time of death estimations, nuclear chemistry, poisons, and DNA analysis. This course is intended for non-science majors who have never taken a chemistry course and may serve as a prerequisite for General Chemistry I (CHEM 161). Not for credit if completed CHEM 161 or equivalent. 4 credit hours

IAI Physical Sciences

CHEM 120: Fundamentals of Chemistry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093 OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is a one-semester survey of general, organic, and biological chemistry for students who plan to pursue a health-related profession or who have an interest in chemistry. An emphasis is placed on the relationship between chemistry and life through issues and examples from the health, medical, and environmental fields. A two-hour laboratory exercise each week is used to reinforce the lecture material. Credit will not be given for both CHEM 120 and CHEM 161 (or equivalent). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 902L

IAI Physical Sciences

CHEM 161: General Chemistry I

Prerequisite(s):
-High school or college level chemistry course within the last five years OR
-Completion of CHEM 099 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Completion of MATH 109 OR
-Placement at MATH 128 or higher
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

An introduction to the basics of chemistry for those students who are concentrating their studies in the sciences. Those fundamentals concepts of chemistry included are chemical formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, structure of molecules, chemical bonding, and the behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. A three-hour lab each week will reinforce the lecture material. 5 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 902L
IAI Major Code - CHM 911

CHEM 162: General Chemistry II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHEM 161
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A continuation of CHEM 161, including a study of kinetics, equilibrium, acids & bases, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metals. A three-hour laboratory exercise each week will reinforce the lecture material. 5 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CHM 912

CHEM 241: Organic Chemistry I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHEM 162
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of organic chemistry. Those fundamental concepts of organic chemistry included are the structure and bonding of, the acid-base principles of, and the standard (IUPAC) nomenclature of the various classes of hydrocarbons. Also, types of isomerism, substitution and elimination reactions, reaction mechanisms, and an introduction to various spectroscopic techniques are included. A three-hour lab each week will stress the synthesis, identification, and separation of organic compounds. 5 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CHM 913

CHEM 242: Organic Chemistry II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHEM 241
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. This course will focus on the synthesis, reactivities, and mechanisms of various organic reactions. Topics will include the study of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, amides, aromatic derivatives, and biologically important molecules. Two three hour labs each week will emphasize the synthesis, characterization, and identification of organic compounds that feature different functional groups. 5 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CHM 914

CHEM 297: Independent Study in Chemistry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive work in a chemistry subject of special interest to the student. Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive written report. 1-3 credit hours

CHIN 101: Chinese I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement into ENGL 099
AND
-Placement at READ 091

A beginning course in Chinese focusing on the development of basic communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The dialect taught is Mandarin, and the course is designed for students who have had no prior exposure to the Chinese language. The course includes basic vocabulary, essentials of Chinese grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, and the use of speech patterns. Additionally, knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Chinese-speaking world play an integral part in the learning process. 4 credit hours

CHIN 102: Chinese II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHIN 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass CHIN 101 proficiency exam OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is the second course at the beginning level in Chinese, focusing on further development of basic communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The dialect taught is Mandarin, and the course is designed for students who have had CHIN 101 Beginning Chinese I or equivalent. The course includes basic vocabulary, essentials of Chinese grammar and syntax, and the use of speech patterns. Additionally, knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Chinese-speaking world play an integral part in the learning process. 4 credit hours

CHIN 201: Chinese III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHIN 102 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass CHIN 102 proficiency exam OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is the first course at the intermediate level in Chinese, the Mandarin dialect, focusing on conversation combined with a further study of grammatical and syntactic rules to develop communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 4 credit hours

IAI Humanities

CHIN 202: Chinese IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHIN 201 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass CHIN 201 proficiency exam OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is the second course at the intermediate level in the Mandarin dialect of Chinese, focusing on conversation combined with further study of grammatical and syntactic rules and of cultural elements in order to develop communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, which are necessary for everyday life. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H1 900

CHLD 101: Intro to Early Childhood

This survey course provides an overview of early childhood care and education including historical and cultural perspectives, organization, structure, programming, and evidence-based practices. Professional and evidence-based practices of highly-qualified early childhood educators are outlined with an emphasis on their ability to enhance development and learning of each and every child between the ages of birth and eight. Considerations for diversity of culture, language, race, socio-economic status, gender, ethnicity, and ability will be included. Students will spend a minimum of 15 hours of observation in diverse early childhood settings. 3 credit hours

CHLD 102: Growth and Development of the Young Child

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an overview of the theory and principles of human growth and development from conception through adolescence. Content includes an in-depth study of the inter-relatedness of physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects of development. Development is studied in the context of family, gender, culture, language, ability, socioeconomics, diversity, and society. Special emphasis will be on the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Gardner. Four field observations are required outside of class time in addition to at least two during class sessions. 3 credit hours

CHLD 103: Environmental Design to Support Children’s Play

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHLD 102
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The types and functions of play are studied, along with an exploration of play techniques that allow children to exercise their physical abilities, learn about their world, and cope with their conflicts and emotions. The role of the teacher in facilitating play and choosing appropriate equipment is emphasized. 3 credit hours

CHLD 105: Curriculum for Early Childhood Programs

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The principles involved in planning, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate, evidence-based curriculum for young children are studied. The course focuses on relationships among developmental theory, philosophy, and practice, and development of curriculum based on the needs and interests of young children including those who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. The analysis of a wide range of early childhood curriculum models is emphasized. Six field experiences will be required for this class. 3 credit hours

CHLD 108: Guidance of the Young Child

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The theories of behavior analysis and guidance are introduced and the relationship between careful observation and effective interaction with children is examined. Techniques and skills will be presented that promote appropriate behavior management. 3 credit hours

CHLD 109: Observation & Assessment of Young Children

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to demonstrate to the student how to do authentic, alternative, classroom-based assessment on young children and how to appropriately use standardized test information. The course will further provide the student with the knowledge and skills to interpret and use the information gained to plan curriculum that is responsive to and supportive of children’s learning and development. Students will have the opportunity to engage in assessment processes through means of classroom observations, providing each student with a stronger understanding of child development skills. Students learn about and explore a variety of age, individually, linguistically, and culturally appropriate formal and informal assessments to gather and share information on each child’s skills, abilities, interests and needs, birth through age 8. Includes field experiences. 3 credit hours

CHLD 110: Introducation to Human Verbal Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the study of human communication, including the anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing, with an emphasis on speech and language development in children and the role of the practitioner in supporting first and second language acquisition. This course includes evidence-based curriculum and assessment strategies. Field Experiences required. 3 credit hours

CHLD 115: Spoken and Written Language Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the acquisition of spoken and written language from infancy through adolescence. The course includes information on bilingual development. 3 credit hours

CHLD 201: Child Development Practicum I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHLD 102, CHLD 105, CHLD 109, CHLD 202, and CHLD 209
AND
-Cleared DCFS licensing background check
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course deals with the practical application of evidence-based practices based on early childhood education principles and theories. Students work with diverse young children and families in high-quality, culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse early childhood settings under the supervision of a site supervisor and a college course work supervisor. Six hours of lab work will be required each week. This course meets for 1 hour seminar and 6 hours practicum for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

CHLD 202: Health, Safety & Nutrition for the Young Child

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an overview of the health, safety and nutritional needs of young children and early childhood practices to ensure the health and well-being of each child in a group setting. Content includes roles and responsibilities of adults in meeting children’s diverse needs, the promotion of healthy life style practices, understanding common childhood illnesses and injuries, meeting health, nutrition and safety standards, and planning nutritious meals that are appropriate for each child. 3 credit hours

CHLD 204: Infant and Toddler Care

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHLD 201
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The principles, practices and programming for infants and toddlers are presented, applied and evaluated. The focus of the course includes developmentally appropriate practices, an overview of assessment, and the importance of partnering with families. 3 credit hours

CHLD 205: Family Child Care Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course considers issues and responsibilities in providing home day care for infants and young children. 2 credit hours

CHLD 206: Child Development Practicum II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CHLD 201 and CHLD 204
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course builds on skills and knowledge acquired in CHLD 201 (Child Development Practicum I) and Infant and Toddler Care (CHLD 204). The supervised practicum experience in early childhood settings emphasizes practical application of early childhood education principles and theories within infant and toddler settings. This course meets for 1 hour seminar and 6 hours practicum for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

CHLD 207: Exceptional Child

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHLD 102
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Overview of children with exceptional cognitive, social, physical, and emotional needs. Course explores current issues, including educational implications for children with special needs, their families, and the community. Identification, intervention strategies, methods, and programs to meet their needs are all discussed. Study of applicable federal and state laws and requirements: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Individualized Family Service Plan, Individualized Education Plan, and inclusive programs. Fulfills requirements of School Code, Article 21, 2a. 3 credit hours

CHLD 208: Child Care Center/Early Childhood Administration

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course examines a variety of management processes, as well as components needed for an effective center, including staffing, budgeting, development of policies, purchasing, monitoring of program quality, evaluation, parent involvement, computers and administrative software, licensing and accreditation. Accessing community resources and professional organizations as a means to improving program quality will be addressed. 3 credit hours

CHLD 209: Child, Family and Community

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course focuses on the diverse needs of the child within the context of family, school and community. The course will examine the interplay of diverse cultures, lifestyles, abilities, language and communication with the role of the early childhood environment and other community institutions. Students will gain an understanding of their professional role in supporting evidence-based practices that strengthen respectful, collaborative family/child partnerships through effective use of community and family resources. 3 credit hours

CHLD 210: School Age Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course examines knowledge and skills needed to work effectively with the school-age child. Focus is on planning, organizing, and implementing developmentally appropriate activities. 2 credit hours

CHLD 215: Child Advocacy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course will prepare early childhood educators to serve as advocates for the early childhood profession and the children and families who are served by the profession. Topics covered will include: 1) becoming an advocate; 2) developing a grass-roots movement; and 3) learning to motivate and influence others through advocacy. 2 credit hours

CHLD 220: Individual and Family Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Overview of the development of the individual throughout the lifespan within the context of the developing family and society. A theoretical emphasis will be placed on the interdependence between the individual and the context they exist within. 3 credit hours

CHLD 221: Foundations of Inclusion

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Foundations of Inclusion focuses on the practical knowledge and skills necessary for childcare providers and other early childhood professionals to successfully practice inclusion. Topics covered include individual learning plans, accessibility, partnering with parents, arranging the environment, and selecting and adapting toys and materials. Also addresses guidance, positioning, and communication. 3 credit hours

CHLD 296: Special Topics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091
-And consent of the department

Course will offer students an opportunity to study a topic which is (1) unique and infrequently offered as a part of their program curriculum or (2) of special interest to the field of early childhood. 1-4 credit hours

CNST 101: Construction Materials and Methods

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Construction Materials and Methods introduces light commercial and residential construction techniques and materials. The course will provide information on the basic construction principles and the materials used in the industry. 3 credit hours

CNST 103: Building Mechanical & Electrical Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MAIN 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in TMAT 103 or any college level math
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces students to the basics of mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection (MEP) systems commonly found in commercial buildings. Topics covered include design, installation, and maintenance of MEP systems, construction documents, estimating, energy efficiency, and troubleshooting. 3 credit hours

CNST 113: Construction Documents & Quantity Takeoff

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Construction Documents and Quantity Takeoff covers the basics of construction blueprint reading and quantity takeoff, including the topics of drawing types, nomenclature, technical drawings applications and material usage. This course prepares those involved in the planning, supplying, and/or building of structures to read construction blueprints and provide a list of materials.

While there is no formal prerequisite for this course, students should have a familiarity with basic mathematical concepts of fractions and linear measurement. 3 credit hours

CNST 152: Surveying and Site Planning

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Surveying and Site Planning will provide a hands-on learning environment to develop an understanding of surveying applications and site planning considerations. Students will learn about the planning, design, layout, and construction of our physical environment and infrastructure; development of effective strategies to solve surveying problems will be emphasized. Students will also learn about practical approaches involved in evaluating and planning sites within the context of natural and cultural systems; emphasis will be placed on developing the knowledge and practical skills to become capable of analyzing and planning a site for development. It is recommended that a student complete CNST 101 and a college-level math course prior to this course. 3 credit hours

CNST 224: Construction Estimating & Scheduling

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CNST 113
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Construction Estimating and Scheduling covers construction estimating and the tools used to determine the costs of any building project. This course reinforces the concepts of blueprint reading and visualization skills required to help understand how to accurately estimate a construction project. Emphasis will be on the importance of determining project costs and schedule prior to the start of construction. 3 credit hours

CNST 225: Buidling Maintenance & Repair

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Building Maintenance and Repair will provide a hands-on learning environment to develop an understanding of the repairs and continued maintenance that should take place during the life-cycle of a building. Specific considerations will be placed on typical areas of a building that have failures and deterioration or where new technologies have been developed, (windows, doors, insulation, siding and weatherproofing). Extensive time will be spent inspecting, troubleshooting existing problems and bringing existing homes within the requirements of the current property maintenance, building and energy codes. [It is recommended that a student complete a CNST 101 and a college level math course prior to this course.] 3 credit hours

IAI Communications

COMM 101: Introduction to Oral Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This is an introductory course in public speaking, with the dual goals of helping students understand basic communication principles and improving their oral communication skills. The course emphasizes preparing, selecting, organizing, and delivering oral messages, as well as analyzing and evaluating the speaking-listening process. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - C2 900

COMM 109: Visual Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to visual literacy by examining images presented in many media including print, photography, fine art, animation and cartoons, film, television, video and multimedia. Covers image processing, theories of visual communication, ethical and cultural issues. Projects will include essays, research, and small group and hands-on activities. 3 credit hours

COMM 120: Interpersonal Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A study of communication theory and its application to interpersonal relations, including analysis of self-concepts and perceptions, verbal and nonverbal codes, and cultural expectations. 3 credit hours

COMM 121: Introduction to Intercultural Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an introductory communication course, emphasizing a variety of communication practices with cultural origins, including nonverbal and verbal practices. The course focuses on both intercultural communication theory and practical approaches to communicating between cultures and subcultures. The course is recommended for any student majoring in communication. 3 credit hours

COMM 125: Small Group Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An introduction to information-providing, problem-solving and decision-making techniques for communication groups, both formal and informal of different types and sizes. Covers such topics as the role of small groups in society and the variables that influence small group communication, such as participation roles and types of leadership. 3 credit hours

COMM 132: Introduction to Photojournalism

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The course is an introduction to the principles and techniques of photojournalism for use in print, broadcast, web and other journalistic mass media. This course will advance students’ skills in digital camera use and introduce them to digital technology. Ethical, legal, technical and aesthetic issues will be explored as well as the history of photojournalism. Students will need to provide their own digital SLR camera (equipped with manual override), lenses of varying focal lengths, and a flash with adjustable output. This class assumes little to no knowledge of photography and Photoshop. Students will meet 6 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

COMM 135: Writing for the Media

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to the basic techniques of news gathering and reporting including researching, interviewing, editing and rewriting procedures. Emphasis on learning news writing style. Introduction to writing in various formats including newspapers and magazines, public relations and broadcast. 3 credit hours

COMM 136: Newspaper Production

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Students will collaborate to publish the College’s student newspaper, The Spectator. Students will study the fundamentals of newspaper production, including news gathering and reporting, writing in Associated Press style, information sources, interviewing, editing, and graphic design and layout, business and advertising management, promotion and circulation and media law and ethics. 3 credit hours

COMM 160: Mass Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

COMM 160 is a study of the historical, social, and cultural impact of mass media on society. This course also examines different forms of communication from print to media to social media. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - MC 911

COMM 210: Intro to Communication Theory

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides students with a general overview of communication theory and a concrete understanding of specific communication theories. Emphasis is placed on evaluation of communication theories and their application to everyday life. 3 credit hours

COMM 220: Advertising and Culture

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course explores the modern history of advertising, using methods of analysis which include marketing strategies and the impact of advertising on social and cultural consciousness. Of particular interest will be the ways in which advertising, while associated with higher levels of consumption, are linked with environmental destruction, restrictive gender identities, the decline of public life, personal dissatisfaction, and the commodification of culture. 3 credit hours

COMM 250: Activism

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed for students who want to develop their skills in doing activism. Course materials, class discussions, guest speakers, educational excursions, and designing and implementing individual, semester-long projects will develop students’ personal philosophies regarding social justice and enhance their abilities to analyze issues and engage in political activism. This course will be cross-listed as POS 250. 3 credit hours

COMM 296: Special Topics in Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an advanced course in communication studies, with variable content that is focused on research, theory, and application in a particular topic of communication studies (such as organizational communication, sexual communication, media, etc.) Readings will center on current developments in the study of communication and may have an interdisciplinary, social scientific, ethnographic, and/or critical perspective. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, COMM 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits. 1-3 credit hours

COMM 299: Internship in Communication

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Completion of COMM 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in COMM 130, COMM 135, or COMM 160
AND
-Completion of 15 credit hours
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Supervised field experience in a variety of settings related to communication, including businesses, publications, advertising and public relations agencies, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and governmental agencies. Students will receive on-the-job experience, in a volunteer or paid capacity, for at least five hours a week (a total of 75 hours a semester equals one internship credit hour) to gain practical skills and experience. Credit is available only for work experience which has been approved in advance by the internship coordinator. 1-6 credit hours

CRJ 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Introduction to Criminal Justice is an examination of the various processing stages, practices, and personnel of the criminal justice system. The components of the criminal justice system including the police, courts and the corrections field will be explored from both a historical and contemporary perspective. This course is designed to make the student a more informed citizen of criminal justice data, services delivered in response to crime, and its impact on society. It is also designed to provide a broad base necessary for more advanced studies, for those majoring in criminal justice. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CRJ 901

CRJ 200: Introduction to Corrections

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course familiarizes the student with various correctional alternatives, including institutional, as well as community sanctions. Controversies and emerging trends in corrections will also serve as a focus of the course. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CRJ 911

CRJ 201: Introduction to Criminology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on theoretical and conceptual explanations of criminal behavior. The study of crime causation, patterns, trends, victims, and society’s reactions to crime, as well as the offender is examined. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CRJ 912

CRJ 202: Policing in America

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course covers the history of law enforcement, its development, procedures and roles it serves in a democratic society. Other topics surveyed include: the hierarchical structure of policing, the liabilities that surround police operations, and the importance of developing a partnership with citizens to effectively combat crime. 3 credit hours

CRJ 204: Criminal Law

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CRJ 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a survey of criminal law, including the historical development of substantive and procedural criminal law. Judicial opinions and case law are reviewed to provide students with a better understanding of the criminal justice process. 3 credit hours

CRJ 206: Criminal Investigations

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CRJ 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An analysis of the criminal investigation process, including recording, collection, and preservation of physical evidence. Scientific aids, modus operandi, sources of information, and follow-up techniques will be covered. 3 credit hours

CRJ 208: Administration of Justice

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An overview of the criminal court system in operation. The judicial process involving court personnel, defendants, victims and advocacy groups will be explored. The role of the public defender system will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on rules controlling pre- and post-trial proceedings, including motions, appeals, habeas corpus, courtroom procedures and protocol. 3 credit hours

CRJ 215: Juvenile Justice System

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CRJ 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A course that encompasses the juvenile justice system and the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies. The processing and disposition of the youthful offender is examined. The current methods of treatments and alternatives in dealing with youthful offenders in our society are explored. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CRJ 914

CRJ 218: Terrorism, Intelligence and the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces the student to terrorism and its impact on the criminal justice system in the twenty-first century. Students will examine the relationship between intelligence and homeland security strategies using a case-study methodology. The course also includes a focus on controversial issues surrounding the USA Patriot Act and intelligence gathering within the United States. Additionally, the role that federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies play in counterterrorism will be studied. 3 credit hours

CRJ 220: Current Security Problems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An analysis and review of current security problems, including conducting the security audit, enhancing perimeter security and establishing internal theft procedures. Insurance fraud and other white collar crimes are explored. The records, reports, and laws that pertain to these security issues are included. 3 credit hours

CRJ 222: Police/Community Relations

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An examination of the relationship between police bureaus and the communities they serve. The role of law enforcement in implementing programs to address social problems, cultural issues, and promoting community relations is reviewed. 3 credit hours

CRJ 224: Probation and Parole

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course encompasses the history, nature and practice of the probation and parole process. Topics will include evaluation, varieties of practice, contemporary problems and future trends. The responsibilities and duties of both the probation and parole officer will be discussed. 3 credit hours

CRJ 226: Criminal Justice Careers Seminar

Prerequisite(s):
-Sophmore standing, completion of 15 credit hours in criminal justice courses including CRJ 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course provides a supervised field experience for the student to observe the practices of an approved criminal justice agency. Students will gain practical knowledge of the various operations of that agency and its related employment criteria. Classroom discussion will include topics such as resume writing, interviewing, bona fide occupational qualifications, and locating criminal justice resources on the Internet. 2 credit hours

CRJ 296: Special Topics in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CRJ 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The purpose of this course is to offer students an opportunity to study a topic, which will (1) develop a greater knowledge of the criminal justice field or (2) studies or examines a contemporary issue of concern within the criminal justice system. Course may be repeated up to 3 times with a different topic, for 6 hours of credit. Refer to the schedule book for specific topics offered. Specific topic title will be stated on the student’s transcript. 1-6 credit hours

CRJ 299: Internship in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CRJ 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101
AND
-Completion of 12 credit hours in criminal justice courses OR
-Permission of instructor
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Supervised field experience in a variety of settings related to the criminal justice field including: law enforcement, court services, correctional institutions, advocacy groups or private security. Students will receive on-the-job experience as an aide or in a volunteer capacity for at least five hours per week (a total of 75 hours per semester equals one internship credit hour) to gain practical skills and experience. Students may be required to submit to a criminal history background check, as well as a driver’s license check prior to beginning an on-site experience. 1-6 credit hours

CSCI 100: Basic Computer Literacy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 91 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

This computer literacy course assumes no prior knowledge on the part of the student and covers all aspects of basic computer use from selecting a computer to setup and successful use. Specifically, students will learn how to select a computer package that meets their needs, how to assemble the components (i.e. as traditionally received from a store), how to run the operating system, basic file system operation and maintenance, software installation, Internet use, and basic computer security. Hands-on experiences will be provided for every topic. 1 credit hour

CSCI 101: Introduction to Computer Information Science

This course presents concepts of computer based systems; computer hardware, software, and organization environments; system categories, delivery modes; systems development methods; career opportunities and responsibilities. This is a lecture course with hands on experience with microcomputers. 4 credit hours

CSCI 110: Introduction to Database Management Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Passing the ACSM 101 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An Introduction to database management systems (DBMS). Covers database design, entity-relationship and relational models, schema creation, data normalization and SQL. Introduces transactions, concurrency, and recovery. 3 credit hours

IAI Mathematics

CSCI 115: Discrete Structures

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 109 with a grade of C or better OR
-Placement at MATH 128 or higher
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduction to analysis of finite collections and mathematical foundations of sequential machines, computer system design, data structures and algorithms. Topics include sets and logic, sequences, subscripting and arrays, number systems, counting, recursion, graph theory, trees, nets, Boolean algebra, automata, and formal grammars and languages. Formal proofs (including induction) are introduced early in the course and addressed throughout the course. Connections between the mathematical theory and corresponding computer science applications are pervasive throughout the course. Computer programming labs are written in the current language used in the core Computer Science courses. This course is not intended for a Mathematics major or minor. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 905
IAI Major Code - CS 915

CSCI 130: Computer Science I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of TMAT 103, MATH 106, or MATH 109 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

Concurrent enrollment in CSCI 115 recommended. CSCI 130 is the first course in a sequence of courses for majors in Computer Science. The course introduces a disciplined approach to problem-solving and algorithm development in addition to an introduction to object-oriented programming and data abstraction. The following topics are covered: selection, repetition, and sequence control structures; program design, testing, and good programming style; high-level programming languages; abstract and primitive data types; variable scope and access control; classes and objects; polymorphism and inheritance; arrays, sorting and files. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CS 911

CSCI 131: Computer Science II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 115 and CSCI 130 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The second in a sequence of courses for majors in Computer Science. Covers: design and implementation of large-scale problems; abstract data types; program verification and complexity; recursion; data structures; dynamic concepts; input and output; text processing; an introduction to searching and sorting, and documentation standards. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - CS 912

CSCI 135: COBOL Programming I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to the COBOL Programming language to solve simple business application problems. Lectures and programming lab projects emphasize program structure, language syntax, sequential file processing, table handling, sorting procedures and report logic with control breaks. Structured design, programming, and documentation techniques will be emphasized. Advanced features such as sub-programs and copy libraries will also be discussed. 3 credit hours

CSCI 136: Programming in Visual Basic

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to the Visual Basic.Net programming environment, with a focus on solving small-scale business problems in the Windows environment. Lectures and programming lab projects emphasize program structure, language syntax, sequential and dynamic file processing, data handling, sorting procedures, and data collection. Object-oriented event-driven design, programming and documentation techniques will be emphasized. 3 credit hours

CSCI 138: COBOL Programming II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 135 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is the second in a two-semester sequence. Students will complete more advanced COBOL programming projects utilizing programming tools learned in the first semester course. Additional key topics in this course include multi-level control breaks, multi-level tables, sorting procedures, file access, and embedded SQL. Students will also complete a program in a team development environment. 3 credit hours

CSCI 151: iOS Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better OR
-Equivalent course with Java approved by division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces the iOS platform and the Objective-C programming language. The topics covered include: mobile application guidelines, Objective-C, the iPhone development environment, Cocoa Touch, and the various service layers. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with mobile development concepts. 4 credit hours

CSCI 152: Windows Mobile Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better OR
-Equivalent course with Java approved by division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces the Windows Mobile platform and the .Net programming environment. The topics covered include: mobile application guidelines, C#, Visual Studio, Silverlight, XNA, and the various service layers. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with mobile development concepts. 4 credit hours

CSCI 153: Android Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better OR
-Equivalent course with Java approved by division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces the Android mobile operating system. The topics covered include: mobile application guidelines in general, the Android SDK, and advanced Java concepts unique to the Android operating system. Programming assignments will provide practical experience in developing applications for Android. 4 credit hours

CSCI 171: Computing for Engineering & Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 161 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers the fundamental principles, methods, and concepts of computing with an emphasis on applications in the physical sciences and engineering. Basic problem solving and computing techniques will be taught using structured programming techniques. Fundamental algorithms, data structures, and ANSI C standard mathematical functions will be covered using engineering and scientific problems. Note: This course does not count for credit in a computer science program. 3 credit hours

CSCI 220: C Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a detailed study of the C Programming language and an introduction to Structured Programming methodologies. It includes program planning, design methods, C language procedures, memory management and allocation, data storage and manipulation with data structures, I/O, and efficient programming techniques. 3 credit hours

CSCI 221: C++ Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Fundamental object-oriented programming concepts; develop problem-solving skills using a structured approach; development of structured programs; the basics of C++ programming language; C++ extension to C programming language; object-oriented programming, including classes and objects, inheritance and derived classes, and reusable code. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with C++ concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 222: C# Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 130 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a detailed study of the C# Programming language. It includes classes and objects, exception handling, collections, and I/O. The interaction between Visual C# and the .NET framework will also be discussed. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with C# and OOP concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 224: Programming in Java

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Students who have completed CSCI 130 AND CSCI 131 will not be given credit for CSCI 224 toward their program of study. This course is intended to be both an introduction to Java and the first course in a series designed to teach the fundamentals of Java and prepare students for Java Programmer Certification and Java Developer Certification. The course covers fundamental object-oriented programming concepts and helps develop problem-solving skills using an object-oriented approach. It also covers development of programs using the techniques of object-oriented programming and design, and the basics of the Java programming language. The course will give students experience with classes and objects, inheritance and derived classes, and reusable code. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with Java and OOP concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 230: Network Programming in Java

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course covers fundamental networking programming concepts and helps develop problem-solving skills using an object-oriented approach. Basic networking terminology and implementation of standard networking protocols will be covered along with security and distributed programming issues. In addition, the course will cover database connectivity and basic use. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with Java and networks. 3 credit hours

CSCI 231: Graphical Programming in Java

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course covers fundamental and advanced graphical programming concepts and helps develop problem-solving skills using an object-oriented approach. Basic and advanced graphical techniques, event handling, security, and distributed programming issues will be covered. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with Java concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 232: Enterprise Application Programming in Java

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is intended to be both an introduction to the world of Enterprise Programming and to teach the Java 2 Enterprise Edition Platform (J2EE). The course covers advanced server-side programming concepts and helps develop problem-solving skills using an object-oriented/event-driven approach. Basic and advanced Web techniques, event handling, security, server programming, and distributed programming issues will be covered. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with Enterprise Application concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 233: Enterprise Application Programming in Java I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces Enterprise Application Programming’s web tier using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. The topics covered include: Servlets, Servlet containers, Java Server Pages (JSP), tag libraries, and web frameworks. Basic and advanced web techniques, event handling, security, server programming, and distributed programming issues will be covered. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with enterprise application concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 234: Enterprise Application Programming in Java II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 or CSCI 224 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces the server-side aspects of Enterprise Application Programming using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) platform. The topics covered include: Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), Enterprise Java Beans (EJB), Object Relational Mapping (ORM), logging, application servers, the J2EE Connector Architecture, and enterprise frameworks. Basic and advanced web techniques, event handling, security, server programming, and distributed programming issues will be covered. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with enterprise application concepts. 3 credit hours

CSCI 240: Data Structures

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 131 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Algorithmic paradigms (divide and conquer, greedy, dynamic, back-tracking); recurrence relations; complexity analysis (big oh, big omega, big theta, little oh); algorithms (graphs, sorting, searching, string processing); advanced ADTs (sets, graphs, heaps, hash tables); random number generation and related algorithms. 4 credit hours

CSCI 251: Mobile Game Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 120 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of CSCI 151 or CSCI 153 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces game development on mobile platforms. The topics covered include: mobile application guidelines, small device interface guidelines, and game development concepts. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with mobile development concepts. This is a project-based course in which students will design and develop a game. Students will complete a portfolio documenting their work from initial concept through application completion. 4 credit hours

CSCI 252: Mobile Applications Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 151 or CSCI 153 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces application development on mobile platforms. The topics covered include: mobile application guidelines, small device interface guidelines, UI guidelines and application development concepts. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with mobile development concepts. This is a project-based course in which students will design and develop a full mobile application. Students will complete a portfolio documenting their work from initial concept through application completion. 4 credit hours

CSCI 253: Mobile Communications Programming

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 151 or CSCI 153 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces communications and networking development on mobile platforms. The topics covered include: mobile application guidelines, wireless networking and wireless communications concepts. Programming assignments will provide practical experience with mobile development concepts. This is a project-based course in which students will design and develop applications that use and rely on wireless communications. Students will complete a portfolio documenting their work from initial concept through application completion. 4 credit hours

CSCI 254: Mobile App Development for the Blind

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of one of the following with a grade of C or better: CSCI 151, CSCI 152, or CSCI 153
AND
-Permission of the division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course will provide an opportunity for students to work on real-world applications that provide support for visually impaired scientists and students. Students will participate in requirements gathering, application design, development, and testing of mobile applications. All work will be conducted in partnership with Independence Science.
Each student wishing to enroll in Mobile App Dev for the Blind will be reviewed based on (1) previous experience, (2) courses completed, and (3) aptitude/ability match with selected topic. 4 credit hours

CSCI 260: Database Management Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 110 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a detailed study of relational database administration with advanced concepts. It includes planning for database implementation, installing, configuring, tuning, server administration and data management with the use of structured query language. 3 credit hours

CSCI 296: Special Topics in Computer Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of 75% of program requirements
AND
-Culmulative GPA of 3.0 or higher at the time of application for internship
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

Course will offer students an opportunity to study a topic which is (1) unique and infrequently offered as a part of their program curriculum or (2) of special interest to industry. Each student wishing to enroll in Special Topics in Technology will be reviewed based on (1) previous experience, (2) courses completed, and (3) aptitude/ability match with selected topic. 2-4 credit hours

DMED 101: Introduction to Digital Media

DMED 101 is an introduction to the major media forms used in Digital Media production, including print design, web design, audio production, video production, animation and authoring tools. Students will also investigate the impact of digital media on society and current issues in media and technology. Basic computer skills will be expected in the areas of word processing, graphic and paint programs. 3 credit hours

DMED 110: Web Page Development

An introduction to the World Wide Web on the Internet and its uses as a communication tool. The course will cover essential terms and technologies, creating web pages, critiquing Internet content and a review of ethical and legal issues. Basic computer skills will be expected, especially with word processing and graphic programs. DMED 110 is designed to appeal to students interested in studying the Internet and its many facets and specifically creating pages that can be viewed on the worldwide web through various browsers. Course covers HTML5 and CSS coding as well using web design programs to create content. Special attention is paid to creating web content that adheres to web standards. Students learn basics of image manipulation. The course will have a continuing emphasis on successfully communicating through the web, especially considering design and interactivity. 3 credit hours

DMED 120: Computer Imaging and Design

An introduction to creating and manipulating digital images. Emphasis is placed on studying and applying basic design concepts, while dealing with common print, video and computer designing challenges faced in the business world. Computer graphic programs, including Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign or Quark will be used. Students will also become familiar with modern production equipment such as printers and scanners. Students should be familiar with computers and have some experience with drawing programs. 3 credit hours

DMED 145: Video Production

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to how to effectively use video production equipment to record and edit video for business, education, entertainment and personal use. Course will cover equipment, shooting techniques, composition, lighting, planning and non-linear editing. Students will complete a short video production in this course. 3 credit hours

DMED 150: Interactive Digital Media

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in DMED 110
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

DMED 150 is an introduction to creating interactive interfaces to be distributed through a variety of methods, including the World Wide Web, DVD or other removable media. Emphasis is placed on creating easy to navigate and professional level interfaces for a variety of applications and on successfully deploying those applications across the chosen distribution method. Authoring tools, including Adobe Flash will be used as well as image editing programs Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Special focus will also be placed on using JavaScript with HTML5. Students should be experienced with image editors, graphic design and web design. 3 credit hours

DMED 160: Web Server Administration

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 110 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to the design, configuration, and use of current commercial web servers. Students will install, configure, and maintain one specific current commercial web server package throughout the duration of the course. 3 credit hours

DMED 170: Dynamic Web Technologies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 110 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduction to scripting. Covers basic scripting techniques, basic database techniques and surveys major scripting languages. 3 credit hours

DMED 210: Advanced Web Page Design

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 110 and DMED 150 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Students will create complicated, professional level web page design to effectively communicate messages for a variety of situations. This class will pose a variety of real world challenges that students will need to complete at a professional level, including designing interfaces in HTML and Flash and deploying those interfaces to audience members who qualify to view the content. Development tools, including Adobe Dreamweaver and Flash will be used as well as image editing programs Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Students should be capable graphic designers and have experience with image editors, web design tools and interactive authoring tools. 3 credit hours

DMED 245: Advanced Video Production

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 145 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

DMED 245 focuses on advanced video production concepts, such as live studio production, motion graphics, video compositing, studio lighting, video streaming as well as advanced issues involved in producing informational and narrative video, such as script writing, graphics production and project output using different digital methods. Students will be expected to produce several short videos on a deadline in this course. 3 credit hours

DMED 250: Preparing Print Publications

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 101 and DMED 120
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course will cover basic aspects of preparing copy, line-art and pictures for professional print. Students will build on design skills learned in DMED 120, while focusing on preparing printed pieces on the computer that are appropriate to be sent to a professional print house for printing in quantity. Issues of design, audience, interface and environment will be reviewed. 3 credit hours

DMED 260: Computer Animation

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 101 and DMED 120
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course will cover basic aspects of animation using animation software, including modeling objects and bringing them into a virtual environment to add lighting, surfaces and motion for a completed scene. Issues of design, audience, interface and environment will be reviewed. 3 credit hours

DMED 270: JavaScript

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 110 and CSCI 130 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a detailed study of JavaScript. It includes program planning, design methods, language procedures, and object-oriented programming fundamentals. 3 credit hours

DMED 275: PHP

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 110 or CSCI 130 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a detailed study of PHP. It includes program planning, design methods, language procedures, and server-side web programming fundamentals. 3 credit hours

DMED 290: Advanced Media Production

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 145 and DMED 210
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in DMED 260
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a capstone experience that integrates various digital media skills as students work in a team to complete projects on a weekly basis in a realistic production environment. Students create and maintain their own section of a continually updated web site, with content they conceive, write, produce and post. 3 credit hours

DMED 292: Capstone Experience

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in DMED 245 and ART 291
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The objective of this course is to provide a culminating experience for students. The capstone experience consists of five components: a project proposal, an art project(s), a research paper which contextualizes the students work in a historical, theoretical, and or social context, an artist statement, and a statement about the work created in this class. 3 credit hours

DMED 296: Topics in Digital Media

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

An advanced course in a specific topic in digital media communication, such as a specific software program, language or project. The course is intended to familiarize students with some of the latest technologies and trends in new media. The topic will be announced in the schedule book. Because topics studied will change each semester, DMED 296 may be repeated once for a different topic. 1.5-3 credit hours

DMED 297: Independent Study in Digital Media

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course builds on the skills learned in other digital media courses, such as video production, motion graphics, computer animation and Web page design. Students will complete projects on a weekly basis in a realistic production environment. They will create and maintain their own section of a continually updated Web site, with content they conceive, write, produce and post. 1-4 credit hours

DMED 299: Digital Media Internship

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of DMED 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

Student interns will work, in a paid or volunteer capacity, to learn about digital media applications in a variety of settings including business, industry, non-profit organization, education, and government. Interns gain practical skills and experience while being supervised on the job and through the college. A total of 75 hours equals one internship credit hour. Credit is available only for work experiences approved in advance, before the internship begins, by the digital media communications department. 1-6 credit hours

DSGN 110: Interior Design I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is an introduction to the principles and elements of residential interior planning and functional room analysis. Major content areas are: texture, pattern, color, light and theme, functional planning, window treatments, wall coverings and floor coverings, natural and artificial lighting, and textiles. 3 credit hours

DSGN 111: Interior Design II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An introduction to interior and exterior styles featuring the study of furniture and furnishings as related to residential and commercial design. Students will also study the various design movements, furniture arrangement and accessories, and the challenges for the future. Content areas include furniture selection, styles, and furniture arrangement and wall composition; accessories; the historic heritage of architecture and design; modern architecture and design. 3 credit hours

IAI Physical Sciences

EASC 101: Introduction to Geology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Study of the origin and types of earth materials and the processes at work in our physical environment. Topics include earthquakes, erosion, mountain building, minerals, rocks, volcanoes, and glaciers. A two-hour lab each week will emphasize lecture material. Field trip required. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 907L

IAI Physical Sciences

EASC 102: Historical Geology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Focuses on the history of the Earth since its formation. Includes analysis of sedimentary rock systems, evolution and life history, plate tectonic changes through time and age determination methods. Emphasizes the origin and evolution of life, illustrating changing faunas and floras through time; the effects of an evolving atmosphere, changing climate and continental drift. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 907L

IAI Physical Sciences

EASC 111: Environment Earth

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is a course for non-science majors who desire a physical science understanding of environmental concerns. Topics may include: ground water, air quality, land management, nuclear energy, and solid waste disposal. An optional lab (EASC 122) will apply physical science principles to lecture material. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 905

IAI Physical Sciences

EASC 121: Introduction to Earth Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is an introductory physical science class that surveys the fields of geology, oceanography, atmospheric science and astronomy. An optional lab (EASC 122) will apply earth science principles to lecture material. Environmental concerns will be discussed in this class. This class is suitable for students with minimal course work in the sciences and mathematics. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 905

IAI Physical Sciences

EASC 122: Introduction to Earth Science Lab

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EASC 111 or EASC 121
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A beginning college-level laboratory science course that will present basic applications with problem-solving challenges and discovery methods in the physical sciences. 1 credit hour
IAI GEC Code - P1 905L

IAI Physical Sciences

EASC 151: Introduction to Weather

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093 OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a survey of atmospheric processes, structure, and composition. A two hour lab each week will focus on variables that influence day-to-day weather conditions. Atmospheric environmental concerns will also be discussed. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 905L

EASC 297: Independent Study in Earth Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive work in an area of the physical sciences of special interest to the student. Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive written report. 1-3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Microeconomics, including utility, supply and demand, and product and resource pricing with specific emphasis on associated problems of American economy. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S3 902

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ECON 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduction to the American economic system with emphasis on macroeconomics including national income accounting, employment theory, and fiscal and monetary policies. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S3 901

ECON 220: Comparative Economic Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ECON 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ECON 102
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Comparative analysis of several types of economic systems. Discussion of alternative models of economic decision-making. Case studies of such economies as China, Japan, South Africa, Sweden, and Russia. 3 credit hours

EDUC 101: Introduction to Education

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to the American education system and as teaching as a profession. Throughout the course students will be offered a variety of perspectives on education including: historical, philosophical, social, legal, and ethical issues in a diverse society. A study of organizational structure and school governance will also be included. A minimum 15-hour clinical component is required for this class. *Note: Students who enroll in EDUC 101 will be required to undergo a criminal background check by a college selected vendor. A clear background check is mandatory in order to complete the course/state required 15 hour clinical component for each class. The cost of the background check will be added as a course fee. 3 credit hours

EDUC 105: Exceptional Learners

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EDUC 101 or CHLD 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSY 209
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This survey course provides an introduction to educating exceptional students and presents the historical, philosophical and legal foundations of special education, as well as an overview of the characteristics of individuals with disabilities, the programs that serve them under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and the diversity of the populations of individuals with disabilities in addition to the general aspect of human diversity. A required component of this course includes real life experiences with an individual(s) with disabilities. A total of 15 hours of field experience is required to pass this course. 3 credit hours

EDUC 135: The Multicultural Classroom

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EDUC 101 or CHLD 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to multiple subcultures present in the American classroom. It will include theories and processes for understanding and working with culturally diverse groups in a classroom setting. It will explore the symbiotic relationship between schools and their cultural context and recent trends with regards to diversity and achievement. 3 credit hours

EDUC 163: Introduction to Coaching Athletics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is a three credit hour education offering that focuses on the critical components that are involved in the profession of coaching athletics. The course has no prerequisites, and is open to anyone interested in developing a foundation for an athletic coaching experience from little league to high school to the collegiate level. Throughout the semester, this course will cover coaching philosophy, coaching ethics, law and liability, leadership skills, fundraising, dealing with parental issues, mental toughness, sports first aid and injury prevention, career opportunities, current issues in coaching and sports administration. Several area coaches, from all different levels of play, will serve as guest speakers for this course. 3 credit hours

EDUC 200: Using Technology in Education

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EDUC 101 or CHLD 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Basic skills in keyboarding, word processing, and spreadsheet strongly recommended. This course will introduce educators to the knowledge and skills required to demonstrate their proficiency in the current technology standards for teaching. The course focuses on both knowledge and performance, and includes hands-on technology activities. 3 credit hours

EDUC 205: Language Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EDUC 101 or PSY 209
AND
-Completion of PSY 209
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a study of normal language developments from birth through school age and an understanding of how children may progress through language development stages at differing rates. Students will also develop an understanding of the effects of diversity, including cultural and linguistic diversity on language development. 3 credit hours

EDUC 208: Principles of Reading

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EDUC 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a study of various methods of teaching reading in the elementary school. It will include sequences in skill development and evaluation of current literacy trends, aims, and practices. Students will also learn techniques for improving comprehension, evaluation of age-appropriate literature, use of technology to support reading, a variety of reading assessments, and strategies for word recognition and vocabulary development. 3 credit hours

EDUC 209: Language Arts in Elementary School

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EDUC 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

EDUC 209 is an introduction to language arts - reading, writing, listening, and speaking - in the elementary school. The course includes recent trends in literacy, techniques for building comprehension, strategies for teaching communication skills, and teaching skills to students whose first language is not English. 3 credit hours

EDUC 220: Educational Psychology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of EDUC 101 or CHLD 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to psychological principles underlying educational practice. Theories concerning cognitive and psychological development, human learning, and motivation are studied with emphasis on application for instruction, including assessment. Emphasis will also be placed on learner-centered instruction and diversity. 3 credit hours

EDUC 296: Selected Topics in Education

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An in-depth study of selected topics in education. The content and structure of the course will vary according to the topic and instructor. May be repeated once with a different topic, for a total of 6 credit hours. Specific topic will be stated on student’s transcript. 1-4 credit hours

ELAP 111: Electrician Apprentice I

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course covers basic fundamentals of electricity, size of wires, sources of electricity, conduits, fasteners, fittings and materials; also the applied mathematics related to these items. 4 credit hours

ELAP 112: Electrician Apprentice II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 111
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will investigate the scope of work an electrical contractor and their association with the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA). Topics include AC and DC circuits, various wiring systems and safety precautions. 4 credit hours

ELAP 121: Electrician Apprentice III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 112
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course introduces the effective use of meters and test equipment. Components to be studied include transformers, capacitors, and rectifiers. Related math and safety topics are included as topics. 4 credit hours

ELAP 122: Electrician Apprentice IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 121
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course includes National Electric Code, applied science and math, sketching schematics, rigging, fire alarm systems, and basic refrigeration and air conditioning. 4 credit hours

ELAP 125: Electrician Apprentice-Teledata III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 112
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers advanced topics in DC theory and circuits, introductory topics relating to telephones and their circuitry/cabling systems, and the National Electrical Code as it relates to wire and wiring. 4 credit hours

ELAP 126: Electrician Apprentice-Teledata IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 125
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers topics in the National Electrical Code as it relates monitoring systems, introductory networking concepts, grounding and bonding fundamentals, and other related circuit/cable/raceway topics. 4 credit hours

ELAP 127: Electrician Apprentice Residential III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 112
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a study of various terms, wiring tasks, wiring methods, materials and associated NEC requirements as appropriate for residential wiring. 4 credit hours

ELAP 128: Electrician Apprentice Residential IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 127
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course involves the theory, applications, calculations and connections associated with transformers and power distribution systems commonly used in the residential electrical field. 4 credit hours

ELAP 131: Electrician Apprentice V

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 122
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Explores advanced electrical theory related to AC current, electrical and mechanical specifications, protective control and starter relays. 4 credit hours

ELAP 132: Electrician Apprentice VI

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 131
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Covers troubleshooting electrical circuits, equipment, complex circuits and controls and application of the National Electrical Code. 4 credit hours

ELAP 135: Electrician Apprentice-Teledata V

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 126
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers electricity concepts (including reactance, Kirchhoff’s Law, Thevenin’s Theorem and Norton’s Theorem), electronics components (including semiconductors, transistors and amplifiers), integrated circuits, and closed-circuit television (CCTV) surveillance systems. 4 credit hours

ELAP 136: Electrician Apprentice-Teledata VI

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 135
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers closed-circuit television (CCTV) surveillance systems, electronic security (including ID systems and locks) and use of test instruments; along with home automation and nurse call systems. This course will also cover advanced topics in cabling, grounding and bonding. 4 credit hours

ELAP 137: Electrician Apprentice Residential V

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 128
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduces the students to residential wiring practices and methods, the NEC requirements and residential blueprint interpretations. Topics include standard residential wiring procedures and practices, NEC requirements, wiring diagrams and wiring layouts. Upon completion, students should be able to read blueprints and know most code requirements. 4 credit hours

ELAP 138: Electrician Apprentice Residential VI

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 137
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Provides the student with information on how to interpret residential blueprints, wiring diagrams, and layouts and will teach them to wire many different circuits in accordance with the National Electric Code. Emphasis is placed on applying the National Electric Code, and actual wiring of panels, service and branch circuits. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret and wire most aspects of a residential application to code. 4 credit hours

ELAP 141: Electrician Apprentice VII

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 132
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course will cover topics related to the installation of fiber optics, the general principles of industrial motor controls and power generation. There will be strong emphasis placed upon measurement within these topics. 4 credit hours

ELAP 142: Electrician Apprentice VIII

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 141
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Studies digital electronics and logical controllers typical to industry. Code calculations relative to industrial settings. There will be strong emphasis placed upon measurement within these topics. 4 credit hours

ELAP 151: Electrician Apprentice IX

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 142
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduces steps and practical experience in fire alarm system and smoke detector start-up procedures, with an introduction to digital instrumentation. 4 credit hours

ELAP 152: Electrician Apprentice X

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELAP 151
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Evaluates installation methods and design of control systems, such as: motion detectors, (PLC) Programmable Logic Controllers, timers and counters, and calculating capacities for high voltage systems. 4 credit hours

ELAP 211: Electrician Internship - Semester 1

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 212: Electrician Internship - Semester 2

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 221: Electrician Internship - Semester 3

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 222: Electrician Internship - Semester 4

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 231: Electrician Internship - Semester 5

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 232: Electrician Internship - Semester 6

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 241: Electrician Internship - Semester 7

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 242: Electrician Internship - Semester 8

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 251: Electrician Internship - Semester 9

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELAP 252: Electrician Internship - Semester 10

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to the IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The electrician internship is to be repeated each semester throughout the (5) five years of the electrical apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 1 credit hour

ELTC 102: DC Electronics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

DC Electronics deals with the descriptive and analytical relationship between voltage, current, resistance, power, and energy in series, parallel and series/parallel DC circuits. Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws, and network theorems will be applied to DC circuits. Laboratory experiences complement the theories studied and allow student to use test instrument and measuring techniques. 3 credit hours

ELTC 103: AC Electronics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 102 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

AC Electronics is a study of alternating current and its uses. Course topics include magnetism, alternating voltage and current, inductance, capacitance, time constants, resonance, and electronic devices. Laboratory experiences complement the theories studied and allow students to use test instruments and measuring techniques. 3 credit hours

ELTC 206: Digital Electronics and Microprocessors

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 102 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Digital Electronics and Microprocessors is the study of operation, characteristics, and applications of digital circuits. Students will study numbering systems, codes, logic gates, Boolean algebra, logic circuits, flip-flops, counter and timers, interfacing the analog world and memory devices. The student will also be introduced to microprocessors and microcomputers. 3 credit hours

ELTC 207: Solid State Electronics Troubleshooting & Measurements

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 103 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course is a study of the operation, characteristics, measuring and troubleshooting electronic, solid state devices. Course topics include using test instruments to measure and troubleshoot power supplies, control circuits and energy delivery systems. 3 credit hours

ELTC 212: Automation & Control Electronics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 206 and 207
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Automation and Control Electronics is the study of automating a process. The course covers controlling motors, fluid-power systems and mechanical systems. Application of microprocessor controllers, transducers and sensors to automate a process is studied. Laboratory experiences complement the theories investigated. 3 credit hours

ELTC 220: Data Communications

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 206 or NETW 160
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to the operation, characteristics, and applications of analog and digital communications. Topics include electromagnetic signals, optical media, analog and digital modulation forms and telecommunication modes. The course expands these topics in helping the student prepare for the FCC General Radio Operators License. 3 credit hours

EMT 101: Emergency Medical Technician

Prerequisite: Healthcare Provider CPR certification and high school diploma or GED must be on file. EMT 101 is an introduction to the principles and practices of pre-hospital emergency care based upon the current U.S. Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety national standard curriculum for providers of primary medical care at scenes of accident and/or illness. This course contains a variety of skills, which require fine-motor coordination. Students must also be physically able to lift and transfer patients safely and correctly. EMT 101 meets federal and state guidelines for EMT training, and students who successfully complete this course will be able to take the Illinois State or National Registry EMT licensure exam. 8 credit hours

EMT 230: Paramedic I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 121 OR
-Completion of BIOL 181 and BIOL 182
AND
-Active Illinois EMT-Basic or EMT-Advanced License
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading
AND
-Completion of Prerequisite Checklist. See an advisor for registration.

EMT 230 is first in a sequence of three courses designed to prepare students for paramedic licensure. Students must successfully complete all courses to qualify for licensure examinations. EMT 230 utilizes cognitive, psychomotor, and affective standard objectives specified in the U.S. Department of Transportation 1998 EMT-Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. Students are exposed to preparatory and operations divisions of the curriculum, including roles and responsibilities, medical-legal aspects, general principles of pathophysiology, and medication administration, followed by ambulance, rescue, and hazardous materials awareness. The semester concludes with advance airway care, and advanced patient assessment and physical examination techniques. Didactic formats include lecture and group learning. 11 credit hours

EMT 231: Paramedic II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EMT 230
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Students must successfully complete all courses to qualify for licensure examinations. EMT 231 utilizes cognitive, psychomotor, and affective standard objectives specified in the U.S. department of Transportation 1998 EMT-Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. The semester begins with the trauma division as students learn structure and function of trauma systems, kinematics, and the implementation of care plans for trauma victims. The medical division begins with an emphasis on cardiac and respiratory emergencies. Students learn to recognize cardiac dysrhythmias, administer cardiac medications, and assess and manage respiratory and cardiac disorders. Didactic formats include lecture and group learning. 11 credit hours

EMT 232: Paramedic III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of EMT 231
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

EMT 232 is third in a sequence of three courses designed to prepare students for Paramedic licensure. Students must successfully complete all courses to qualify for licensure examinations. EMT 232 utilizes cognitive, psychomotor, and affective standard objectives specified in the U.S. Department of Transportation 1998 EMT-Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. The medical division continues in this semester as the endocrine, toxicological, neurological, and gynecological and obstetrical emergencies, among others, are explored. Special consideration is devoted to neonatal, pediatric, and geriatric populations, followed by a look at special needs patients. Didactic formats include lecture and group learning. 11 credit hours

ENGL 94: Writing Skills Review I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 090 or higher

If placed at two or more developmental levels, concurrent enrollment in or completion of GENS 105 is also required.

A reading/writing course that uses an error analysis approach to review English fundamentals, including grammar and sentence structure, punctuation, usage and mechanics. The course introduces students to audience, invention, arrangement and purpose in composing. Course grades will be determined by portfolio assessment. 3 credit hours

ENGL 95: Writing Skills Review II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 95 OR
-Completion of ENGL 94
AND
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 91 OR
-Placement at college level reading

A reading/writing course that offers a rhetoric based review of composing for developing writers. The course offers students extensive practice in reading and writing for various public audiences. Students learn to shape rough preliminary texts into more complex and mature ones. ENGL 095 provides a foundation for college level writing. Course grades will be determined by portfolio assessment. 3 credit hours

ENGL 99: Composition I Companion: Writing, Reading, and Reasoning

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 OR
-Completion of ENGL 094 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Placement at READ 091 OR
-Completion of READ 090
AND
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101

ENGL 099 is a companion course with ENGL 101. Students register for ENGL 099 simultaneously with ENGL 101. ENGL 099 offers writing and learning support for students in a related section of ENGL 101. Course grades will be determined in part by portfolio assessment and language convention skills assessments. 3 credit hours

IAI Communications

ENGL 101: Critical Reading & Writing

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099
AND
-Placement at college level reading

If placed at two or more developmental levels, concurrent enrollment in or completion of GENS 105 is also required.

In English 101, students will improve their writing by learning about the integrated relationship between critical reading and writing skills. Students will explore how genres of communication shape the acts of reading and writing, and in the process, will learn how to become responsible and ethical readers, writers, and designers of various kinds of texts. Students gain exposure to a wide range of tools and skills available and necessary to 21st century readers and writers, including collaboration techniques, visual design principles, and how to effectively control surface features of their writing. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - C1 900R

IAI Communications

ENGL 102: Multimodal Composition

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

In English 102, students will put rhetorical principles into useful cultural practice via researching, designing, creating, and sharing multimodal composition projects that contribute to real academic or career purposes and audiences. Conceptual knowledge of genre, textual control, document design, writer responsibility, and collaboration will be applied as students research academic or career interests. Students will learn and apply both primary and secondary research skills, and will compose projects that successfully employ genre-appropriate reasoning, formats, and structures. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - C1 901R

ENGL 107: Technical Writing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A study of the characteristics, concepts, and procedures involved in the preparation of scientific, technical, and industrial communications, providing models for and practice in writing descriptive, instructional, and analytical material, professional correspondence, and informal and formal reports. This course also includes attention to elements used to augment reports (illustrations, abstracts, summaries) and organizational patterns for oral and written presentations whose purpose and audience are clearly demarcated. Emphasis is upon current practice in professions and trades. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

ENGL 111: Introduction to Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Reading and discussion of representative works from the major genres, with the aim of providing competence in critical reading and analysis, knowledge of formal characteristics, and appreciation of literary excellence. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 900

IAI Humanities

ENGL 112: Understanding Fiction

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Reading and discussion of works of fiction, chiefly short stories, from a variety of authors and periods, with the aim of providing competence in critical judgment and analysis, knowledge of formal characteristics, and appreciation of literary excellence. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 901

IAI Humanities

ENGL 113: Understanding Drama

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Reading and discussion of selected dramatic works, with the aim of providing competence in critical judgment and analysis, knowledge of formal characteristics, and appreciation of literary excellence. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 902

IAI Humanities

ENGL 114: Understanding Poetry

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101 is recommended. Reading and discussion of selected poems, with the aim of providing competence in critical reading and analysis, knowledge of formal characteristics, and appreciation of literary excellence. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 903

ENGL 118: Children’s Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to a wide variety of children’s literature, which may include such genres as fantasy, fairy tales, folklore, myths and legends, poetry, nonsense rhymes, historical fiction, picture books, and so forth. The course defines the parameters of children’s literature as literature for, about, or by children from infancy to the pre-teen years. The course encourages critical thinking and development of analytical and evaluative strategies that are used in the understanding of children’s literature. 3 credit hours

ENGL 119: Adolescent Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to a wide variety of adolescent literature, which might include such genres as fantasy, drama, classic texts, realistic fiction, the problem novel, series, and texts dealing with a variety of themes including marginalization, sexuality, technology, diversity, disability, the supernatural, and so forth. Although the course focuses on literature written for an adolescent audience, the course will also analyze cultural and literary assumptions about adolescents and the ideologies that result from such assumptions. The course encourages critical thinking and the development of analytical and evaluative strategies that are used in the understanding of adolescent literature. 3 credit hours

ENGL 121: Science Fiction & Fantasy Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A review of major works in the science fiction and fantasy genres, including short stories, novels, and film. The course will examine themes to these genres, including alien encounters, time travel, magic, technology, and literary elements such as character, theme, plot, and symbol. 3 credit hours

ENGL 150: Introduction to Non-Western Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college-level reading

This course will involve discussing, analyzing and writing about literature/texts by non-western authors with an emphasis on non-western cultures, including Asian, South Asian, African, Caribbean, and Middle Eastern. The course will look at texts from a number of different genres and historical periods. 3 credit hours

ENGL 206: Creative Writing

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introductory course in writing in the principal belletristic genres, providing extensive practice in writing and in-class analysis and discussion of student work, with particular attention to the creative process and the development of technique. 3 credit hours

ENGL 207: Beginning Narrative Fiction Writing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 206 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a continuation of skills learned in ENGL 206 with an emphasis on the creation of narrative fiction. Requirements include analysis and practical application of writing strategies, peer workshops, and a creative portfolio with a critical introduction that demonstrates an understanding of the structure, elements, and critical terminology of writing narrative fiction. Topics to be covered include historical trends and practices, theoretical and cultural influences, contemporary practices, and analysis of current publication opportunities. 3 credit hours

ENGL 209: Intro to Creative Writing-Poetry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 206 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a continuation of skills learned in ENGL 206 with an emphasis on the creation of poetic writing and publication. Requirements include analysis and practical application of past and current trends in writing and publishing poetry, peer workshops, and a creative portfolio with a critical introduction that demonstrates an understanding of the structure, elements, and critical terminology of poetics. Topics to be covered include historical trends and practices, theoretical and cultural influences, contemporary poetic practices, requirements for interaction in poetry workshops, and current publication opportunities and analysis. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

ENGL 231: American Literature I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A survey of major writers from the colonial period to the Civil War. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 914

IAI Humanities

ENGL 232: American Literature II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. A survey of major writers from the Civil War to the present. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 915

ENGL 233: Burned and Banned Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

What causes texts to be challenged, banned and burned? In the “anything goes” age of YouTube and Facebook, are “forbidden” texts still a possibility? ENGL 233 will examine the history of when and why various texts have become “forbidden content” for the public. We’ll also look at the cultural impact of censorship on intellectual freedom and privacy issues by reading/watching/listening to literature, music, film and other texts from the classics, popular culture, and even from the “innocent” realms of children’s literature. This course will explore issues concerning copyright, intellectual freedom, information access and more—issues that affect your personal privacy, civil rights and your ability to participate in today’s information-rich society. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

ENGL 241: Survey of English Literature I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Development of English literature from its beginnings to roughly 1790. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 912

IAI Humanities

ENGL 242: Survey of English Literature II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Development of English literature from roughly 1790 to the present, including works by native writers in the decolonized parts of the former British Empire. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 913

IAI Humanities

ENGL 254: African-American Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. The study of poetry, drama, fiction, and essays by African-Americans. The selections highlight the contribution that these authors make to American Literature historically and currently. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 910D

IAI Humanities

ENGL 255: Women in Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Discussion and analysis of literature by and about women. The course will look at both canonical and non-canonical authors. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 911D

IAI Humanities

ENGL 270: African Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Discussion and analysis of African Literature from the ancient Egyptian to the present. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 908N

IAI Humanities

ENGL 271: Asian Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 101 is recommended. Reading and analysis of representative masterpieces from Asia. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 908N

ENGL 296: Special Topics in English Studies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is a course in English Studies that is appropriate for students in the second year of college. The course advances strategies of research, writing, and interpretation. The particular topic of the course introduces or advances study of written, oral, visual, or multimedia texts pertinent to any field within English studies, including literature, creative writing, rhetoric, linguistics, English Education, advanced writing, composition, critical theory, cultural studies, and textual production. The study might include formal qualities, historical frameworks, theoretical groundings, secondary literature, cultural dimensions, linguistic features, rhetorical characteristics, symbolic implications, literary elements, or aesthetic applications pertinent to a defined group of texts. Because topics and research studied change each semester, ENGL 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits. 1-3 credit hours

ENGR 110: Engineering Graphics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is an introduction to engineering design and graphics, including design problems, sketching, dimensioning, tolerancing, multi-view orthographic representation, auxiliary views, section views, and working drawings. Students are required to use CAD in this course. Sketching and CAD techniques are integrated in this course. Additionally, Engineering Graphics covers text creation, instrument usage, charts and diagrams, three-dimensional drawings, pictorial drawings, production drawings, engineering design concepts, and fundamental descriptive geometry. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - EGR 941

ENGR 271: Engineering Mechanics: Statics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PHYS 171
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 162
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Mechanics is the study of the effects that forces produce on bodies. This is a course in statics, the branch of mechanics in which bodies are at rest or moving at constant velocity. Topics include particle statics, general principles and force vectors, rigid body equilibrium, moments of inertia, distributed forces and centroids, analysis of structures, virtual work, and friction. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - EGR 942

ENGR 272: Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGR 271
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Mechanics is the study of the effects that forces produce on bodies. This is a course in dynamics, the branch of mechanics in which bodies experience accelerations due to unbalanced forces. Topics include particle kinematics (rectilinear and curvilinear); Newton’s laws; energy, work, and momentum methods; planar dynamics and rigid bodies; rigid body kinematics; impulse and momentum; and vibrations. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - EGR 943

IAI Fine Arts

FILM 101: Introduction to Film Studies

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This class examines film as an art form, as a social practice, and as a business. While we will focus on film as a narrative medium with its various genres and themes, we shall also explore documentary and experimental film from around the world, all as expressed through sound, editing, lighting, set design and other aspects of visual composition and cinematography. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F2 908

IAI Fine Arts

FILM 211: History of Film

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This class explores the history of cinema from its emergence during the late 19th century, through its ascendance as the major form of entertainment in the mid-20th century, to the transformations at the current, digital era. During our journeys, will we examine such t international movements as German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, the U.S. Studio System, Italian Neo-Realism, Occupied Japanese Film, the French New Wave and more. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F2 909

FILM 296: Topics in Film Studies

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is an advanced course in film studies which focuses on various genres and topics such as the Horror Film, Women in Film, Film Noir, Science Fiction Cinema, The Films of Alfred Hitchcock and so on. Each film will be considered by examining the constituent elements and formal qualities that are intrinsic to that particular film and the genre, as well as by studying the relationship of one film to another and to the societies from which they developed. Because topics and films studied will change each semester, FILM 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits toward graduation. 3 credit hours

FREN 101: French I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A beginning course in French, with emphasis on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Basic vocabulary, essentials of French grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, and the use of actual speech patterns are covered. Students with two or more years of high school French should not enroll in FREN 101. 4 credit hours

FREN 102: French II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of FREN 101 OR
-Pass FREN 101 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A continuation of French I, with emphasis on expanding the basic conversational vocabulary and more detailed study of grammatical principles and syntactic patterns. 4 credit hours

FREN 201: French III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of FREN 102 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive practice in conversation and composition, combined with a review of grammatical and syntactic principles to attain advanced intermediate proficiency in speaking, writing, and reading in French. 4 credit hours

IAI Humanities

FREN 202: French IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of FREN 201 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a continuation of FREN 201, with emphasis on expanding the basic conversational vocabulary and more detailed study of grammatical principles and syntactic patterns, along with an expansion of knowledge of French culture as appropriate for speaking and behaving effectively with native speakers. Activities include class reading of short stories, plays, poetry and other literary forms as an introduction to French literature. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H1 900

GENS 100: College Success

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Prerequisite:

- There are no formal placement level or prerequisites required for this course, however placement into READ 090 & ENGL 094 is recommended

A foundational course in active learning strategies and effective study skills that focuses on the learner’s role and responsibility in the learning process. 1 credit hour

GENS 101: Career Success

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Prerequisite:
- There are no formal placement level or prerequisites required for this course, however placement into READ 090 & ENGL 094 is recommended

Explore significant personal factors such as values, interests, skills, and personality preferences in order to make informed career and lifestyle choices. Students will research potential careers and use labor market information, decision-making strategies and goal-setting to develop an individual career action plan. 1 credit hour

GENS 102: Personal Success

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Prerequisite:
- There are no formal placement level or prerequisites required for this course, however placement into READ 090 & ENGL 094 is recommended

This course provides an introduction to academic and personal skills essential for success in college and in life. Topics include personal responsibility, goal setting, critical thinking, and emotional intelligence. Students learn to create success by applying proven principles for active learning, self-motivation, self-management, and interdependence. 1 credit hour

GENS 103: Information Technology Skills

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An introduction to skills necessary in accessing current information technologies needed by students and members of the community while at Heartland Community College. Students will learn to use a computer, basic Windows concepts, basic word processing, and research/communication tools. Course will be revised as needed to keep pace with current technologies and changes in instructional delivery methods. 1 credit hour

GENS 104: Library Research Skills

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An introduction to research skills, this course covers the production, organization, and retrieval of information and knowledge within a societal context. Concepts include creating strategies for locating, evaluating, and incorporating information into a written product. Intellectual freedom, copyright, and plagiarism will be examined. Principles learned in this course will apply to evaluation and analysis of research in other courses. Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ENGL 094 is strongly recommended. 1 credit hour

GENS 105: Life Success

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

This course will help students gain awareness of their academic career and personal selves and facilitate development in each of these areas. Focus will be placed on gaining knowledge of each self, identifying areas of strength and those needing improvement and mastering the tools necessary to achieve growth in these life areas. Students cannot receive credit for both GENS 105 and GENS 100, GENS 101, or GENS 102. 3 credit hours

GENS 106: Mentoring Seminar I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of GENS 105 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will help students gain and enhance the skills needed to be a successful peer mentor. The focus will be on interpersonal communication, choices of successful students, campus resources, case studies and student development as they relate to GENS 105 students. Training will also include effective leadership, listening skills, diversity, and conflict resolution. 1 credit hour

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

GEOG 101: World Geography

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is a study of the interrelationships between contemporary world cultures and geographic structures and regions. The course includes a geographic perspective of human origins and distribution, population, migration, health, climate, culture, language, settlements, industry, and agriculture. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S4 900N

GERM 101: German I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is a beginning course in German, with emphasis on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Basic vocabulary, essentials of German grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, and the use of actual speech patterns are covered. 4 credit hours

GERM 102: German II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of GERM 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass GERM 101 proficiency exam OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a continuation of GERM 101, with emphasis on expanding the basic conversational vocabulary and more detailed study of grammatical principles and syntactic patterns. 4 credit hours

GERM 201: German III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of GERM 102 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass GERM 102 proficiency exam
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This class emphasizes the intensive practice in conversation and composition, combined with a review of grammatical and syntactic principles to improve speaking skills, written composition, and the reading of German. 4 credit hours

IAI Humanities

GERM 202: German IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of GERM 201 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass GERM 201 proficiency exam OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This class emphasizes the intensive practice in conversation and composition, along with an expansion of knowledge of German culture as appropriate for speaking and behaving effectively with native speakers, combined with a review of grammatical and syntactic principles to improve speaking skills, written composition, and the reading of German on a more sophisticated level such as reading short stories, plays, poetry and other literary forms as an introduction to German literature, art and culture. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H1 900

GIS 101: Fundamentals of GIS

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Fundamentals of GIS will provide an introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems. The first part of the course will focus on different types of GIS’s and their capabilities; GIS data collection and input; GIS data types and basic mapping concepts. Students will be introduced to ArcGIS software. The second part of the course will focus on the history, operation and applications of global positioning systems (GPS). Students will be using GPS receivers for navigating and mapping. 3 credit hours

GIS 171: Remote Sensing

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Remote Sensing will provide an overview (as the applications are virtually unlimited) of the principles of remote sensing and image processing. Students will learn about satellite imagery and aerial photography as data sources for geographic information systems, along with image enhancement, classification techniques and spatial relationships. 3 credit hours

GIS 201: Applications of GIS

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of GIS 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Applications of GIS will provide opportunities for project-based learning with additional hands-on experience. Topics will include addressing geographic problems involving street networks, continuously varying map features (such as elevation) and those requiring 3D visualization. Students will use ArcGIS software, along with other software, as appropriate. 3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 101: Western Civilization to 1500

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course covers the main stream of Western civilization from the first millennium B.C. to 1500. The course considers religious, economic, and cultural trends and developments as well as the major political events of the period. The focus of the course is on Europe but the great Middle Eastern civilizations and cultural contributions are considered as they impact Europe and help shape the West. Special attention is given to individuals and their contributions as well as to the rise of nations. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 902

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 102: Western Civilization Since 1500

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course covers the development of the modern West in terms of the great movements of the past five centuries: The Reformation, The Enlightenment, Absolutism and the rise of the nation state, the French Revolution, Industrialization, the emergence of modern political ideology, the World Wars, the Cold War and the roots of the present political situation. The course emphasizes watershed events in the realm of religion, politics, economics, artistic and cultural developments, and war. Special attention is given to the contributions of individuals in shaping the modern world. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 903

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 135: History of the US to 1865

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course covers the major political, social, economic and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States from the early explorations of America to the Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 900

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 136: History of the US Since 1865

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course covers the major political, social, economic and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 901

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 150: Latin American History

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is an introduction to Latin American history. As such, the cultural, economic, political, and religious characteristics of the region will be discussed. The sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries are the principal concern. The topics include the indigenous civilizations of the Americas; the motives for, and the methods and results of, the Iberian conquest and colonization; the struggle for independence from Spain; the national period; legacy from the past and new dependency; and twentieth century Latin America. Though the emphasis will be on the Spanish heritage, the course will include a brief examination of the Brazilian experience. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 910N

HIST 210: African-American History

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course examines major political, social and economic events in African-American history. The topics to be included are: the African background; slavery; emancipation; the Civil War and Reconstruction; Blacks in the 20th Century; the Civil Rights movement; and social, cultural and economic aspects of Black history. 3 credit hours

HIST 240: History of the American Frontier

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Westward movement and the influence of the frontier on American life and institutions are covered. Focus is on the local and Midwestern context. 3 credit hours

HIST 259: History of Illinois

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course presents Illinois history from the earliest times to the present. It includes political, economic, social, cultural, educational, and constitutional developments. 3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 261: Non-Western Civilization I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of non western civilizations from their earliest origins to the late-fifteenth century. The cultural, political, economic and social roots will be explored. An appreciation of the organizing principles and philosophical and religious tenets of these diverse civilizations will be developed through in depth readings on selected topics in all of the following areas: East Asian, South Asian, Western and Central Asian, African and Native American. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 904N

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

HIST 262: Non-Western Civilization II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of non-western civilizations from the late-fifteenth century to the present. The cultural, political, economic and social roots will be explored. An appreciation of the organizing principles and philosophical and religious tenants of these diverse civilizations will be developed through in-depth readings on selected topics in all of the following areas: East Asian, South Asian, Western and Central Asian and African. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S2 905N

HIST 296: Special Topics in History

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Course will provide an in-depth study of selected topics in history. The content and structure of the course will vary according to the topic and instructor(s). The course may be repeated up to three times with a different topic, for a total of 9 credit hours. Specific topic title will be stated on student’s transcript. 1-3 credit hours

HIT 201: Medical Transcription

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of OTEC 118 and ACSM 155
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HLTH 111, HLTH 135, and HLTH 209
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

HIT 201 is designed as the entry-level course focusing on formatting reports, editing and proofreading transcribed work, and going through a systemic approach reviewing medical terminology, and anatomy and physiology as well as pharmacology topics and how they are interrelated to medical transcription. Students will discuss issues of confidentiality and the impact of speech recognition technology on the field of medical transcription. 3 credit hours

HIT 202: Advanced Medical Transcription

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of HIT 201 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides hands-on transcription experience for students to develop skill in interpreting oral dictation of health records to electronic and written form. Students will practice advanced skills in medical transcription by transcribing simulated recordings of a variety of experiences including those involving ethical and legal considerations in professional and medical situations. 3 credit hours

HIT 211: Classification and Indexing I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ACSM 155 and HLTH 110 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HLTH 111, HLTH 135, and HLTH 209
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

HIT 211 is designed as the entry level course introducing concepts of reimbursement, HIPAA and compliance processes in the acute care setting. The course will also provide an overview of both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes with the inclusion of ICD-9 CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting. Case studies and simulation lab will integrate anatomy and physiology, medical terminology and pharmacology in a systemic approach. 3 credit hours

HIT 212: Classification & Indexing II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of HIT 211 with a grade of C or better OR
-Concurrent enrollment in HIT 211
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

HIT 212 is designed to expand upon concepts learned in HIT 211 with the inclusion of CPT and HCPCS codes. Students will learn how to recognize modifiers and understand their purpose. Course also includes understanding evaluation and management services utilizing the key components of a patient’s history, physical exam and medical decision making. Case studies and the simulation lab utilizing Evolve will allow students to have experience coding actual medical records in the electronic format. 3 credit hours

HIT 293: Medical Transcription Practicum

Prerequisite(s):
-Cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher and sophomore standing OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will be the capstone for the medical transcription certificate. Students will gain experience as a medical transcriptionist under the supervision of a site supervisor and a college instructor. 4 credit hours

HIT 294: Medical Coding Specialist Practicum

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of HIT 212 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will be the capstone for the medical coding specialist certificate. Students will gain experience as a medical coder under the supervision of a site supervisor and a college instructor. 4 credit hours

HLTH 100: Career Explorations in Health Care

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Through the exploration of possible career choices in healthcare, students will determine prerequisites for academic programs leading to those careers, identify job entry requirements, use appropriate resources, and apply study strategies leading to success in their chosen academic program. 2 credit hours

HLTH 101: Heartsaver First Aid

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

HLTH 101 is designed for the layperson in the workplace or at home rather than the healthcare provider. Students will receive instruction in six sections, including general principles, medical emergencies, injury emergencies, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, automated external defibrillation, and environmental emergencies. A two-year Heartsaver First Aid certification is issued to students who successfully complete the course. 2 credit hours

HLTH 104: BLS for Healthcare Providers

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

The American Heart Association (AHA) Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers Course has no specific prerequisites. The vast majority of participants will consist of individuals preparing for emergency medical services, nursing, and other healthcare providers. This course meets the requirements for lifeguards, police, firefighters, childcare workers, and lay workers who are completing prerequisites for the BLS Instructor’s Course, EMT 101, and the nursing curriculum. 0.5 credit hour

HLTH 105: Stress Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the effects that stress has on physical and emotional health. Emphasis will be on the identification of stressors, stressful reactions, and healthful strategies to decrease stress. 3 credit hours

HLTH 110: Medical Terminology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Through the study of medical prefixes, roots, and suffixes, students will learn how to define and use medical terms as they relate to body structure and function, medical procedures, and disease processes. Spelling, pronunciation and abbreviations will also be emphasized. 3 credit hours

HLTH 111: Diseases of the Human Body

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 121 OR
-Completion of BIOL 181 and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 182
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to the current understanding of disease processes across the life span. This course examines the major health problems in the United States, emphasizing etiology, risk factors, gender differences, physiologic changes of specific diseases and treatment approaches. 3 credit hours

HLTH 116: Health Effects of Recreational Drugs

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Content will address the use, misuse, and abuse of legal and controlled drugs and their medical, pharmacological, legal, and economical impacts that they have on the individual, one’s relationships, and society. A brief history of drug use in the world and America will also be studied. 3 credit hours

HLTH 118: Personal Health and Wellness

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Principles covering responsible behavior and risk factors influencing one’s physical health, psychological health, and sexual health throughout the lifespan will be studied. 3 credit hours

HLTH 120: Nutrition

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will emphasize general principles regarding the functions and sources of essential nutrients. Applicable information regarding nutrition throughout the lifespan, nutrition-related medical conditions, and nutritional planning will also be studied. 3 credit hours

HLTH 131: Principles of Weight Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The class will focus on the impact of weight loss/gain on chronic disease development, psychological influences and physiological processes that impact weight management, nutritional and physical activity principles, and evaluation of popular weight management methods. At the end of this course, students will be able to create a nutritious eating plan and physical activity program for their particular lifestyles and health goals. A field trip(s) is/are tentatively planned. 3 credit hours

HLTH 135: Pharmacology for Healthcare Professionals

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides a broad overview of the history, applications, metabolism, and terminology of prescribed drugs for the allied health professional. It will also include a systemic review of the most commonly prescribed drugs/medications and pharmacological references. This course cannot be substituted for NURS 113 or any other NURS course. 3 credit hours

HLTH 140: Walking for Health

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course emphasizes a beginner’s walking program (ie., 10,000 steps per day) to promote health and decrease the risk of disease. Other topics include benefits of exercise, assessment of fitness levels, the body’s adaptation to exercise, injury prevention, and basic nutrition. This course includes weekly walking labs. 2 credit hours

HLTH 141: Walking/Jogging Lab

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of HTLH 140 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course is a continuation of HLTH 140 – Walking for Health, and focuses on improving cardiovascular health, speed, and endurance. Students will meet during the semester for lecture activities and for physiological testing, but will complete activity labs on their own. 2 credit hours

HLTH 142: Introduction to Strength Training

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This introductory course in strength training emphasizes muscle anatomy and physiology, adaptive responses of muscle tissue, safety procedures, relationship to chronic disease, and types of strength training routines using machines and free weights. At the end of the semester, students will be required to formulate their own personal strength training routine using scientific principles. 2 credit hours

HLTH 143: Strength Training Lab

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of HLTH 142 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course is a continuation of HLTH 142 –Introduction to Strength Training, and focuses on improving lifting form and physical strength. Students will meet during the semester for lecture activities and for physiological testing, but will complete activity labs on their own. 2 credit hours

HLTH 146: Mind/Body Health

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course is an exploration of four of the dimensions of health (social, emotional, spiritual, and intellectual wellness) and their relationships to physical wellbeing. Through class work and lab, students will develop a strong knowledge base regarding brain anatomy and chemistry, and the role the mind plays in physical health. Labs include introductions to yoga, meditation, and Tai Chi. 2 credit hours

HLTH 147: Sports Conditioning

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Through class work and lab, students will develop a strong knowledge base regarding basic human anatomy, including bones, muscles, and their respective responses to high impact exercise. Labs include sports training, specifically plyometrics (exercises involving explosive shortening and lengthening of muscles), core and upper body strength, and agility (the ability to efficiently change the body’s position using a combination of balance, coordination, reflexes, strength, speed, and endurance). 2 credit hours

HLTH 170: Introduction to Leisure and Recreation

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This class will survey the nature of leisure and recreation by reviewing the influence of history, culture, economics, religion, technology, and environment on play, leisure, and wellbeing. Applicable careers in tourism, military, health industry, public, and private sectors will be explored. This course may include field trips and/or outdoor activities. 3 credit hours

HLTH 171: Recreation Leadership

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HLTH 170
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to recreation leadership by providing students with hands-on leadership experiences across a variety of recreational activities. Study will focus on the development of activity planning skills, individual leadership skills, and group facilitation methods. This course may include field trips and/or outdoor activities. 3 credit hours

HLTH 180: Introduction to Gerontology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This introductory course in Gerontology includes an overview of the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging. Topics included are normal versus pathological aging, society’s view of and response to aging, and current issues facing the aged, such as healthcare, finances, and social change. 3 credit hours

HLTH 181: Biological Aspects of Aging

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course includes a systemic review of the physiologic changes of the body as it ages. It will also include theories of biological aging; genetic, environmental, and social influences on aging; common medical conditions; and nutritional concerns of the aged. 3 credit hours

HLTH 184: Introduction to Physical Activity and Aging

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HLTH 181
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces various issues regarding physical activity and the aged, such as body adaptations, exercise guidelines, modifications to exercise, readiness to exercise, barriers, and adherence. 3 credit hours

HLTH 202: Professional Issues in Health Care

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will emphasize legal aspects and professional issues that affect all medical and allied-health care professionals. Specific topics include overview of the healthcare system, specialties and scopes of practice, confidentiality and patient rights, liability, medical records, culture and diversity issues, and professionalism in the workplace. Students are encouraged to relate the information to their desired profession for all assignments. 3 credit hours

HLTH 209: Advanced Medical Terminology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of HTLH 110 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will introduce word parts and abbreviations relating to pharmacology, radiography, eyes/ears, endocrine system, integumentary, oncology, psychiatry/mental health, history/physical examination, and surgery. Word building and defining medical terms, recalling abbreviations and eponyms, spelling, diagnostic procedures, medical conditions, and pronunciation regarding all body systems will also be emphasized. Since this is a continuation of HLTH 110, concepts from that class will be revisited often. 3 credit hours

HLTH 225: Clinical Kinesiology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, BIOL 181 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course examines the science of human movement as related to the skeletal, articular, neurological and muscular systems. Applications of biomechanical and kinesiological principles are utilized for the analysis of human motion. 3 credit hours

HLTH 280: Cross Cultural Health Care Exploration

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course includes an overview of the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects of health, illness and aging across different cultures. Topics included are the influence of one’s culture, ethnicity, and spiritual beliefs upon one’s life, including health care decisions. Health care adaptations based on the unique individual or group needs are presented. 3 credit hours

HLTH 284: Gerontology Regulations and Resources

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course in Gerontology builds upon previous courses in the curriculum. The course includes an overview of federal and state regulatory bodies overseeing the population of elders and elder services. Topics include an in-depth look at Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) and The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA) as well as home health, assisted living and elder daycare governing bodies; an exploration of Medicare, Medicaid, and the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) as elder care financial entities; and application of regulations to the practice area. Additionally, resources for elderly individuals, families, care providers, and ancillary persons will be presented. 3 credit hours

HLTH 296: Special Topics in Health

Prerequisite(s):
-Cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher and sophomore standing OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The purpose of this course is to develop a greater knowledge of health topics and to influence the beliefs and behaviors of students to achieve a greater state of health. In all cases, the knowledge and skills students gain here can be transferred to situations one may reasonably encounter in the health and medical industries. Refer to the schedule book for specific topics offered. 1-6 credit hours

HLTH 299: Internship in Health

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of 15 semester credits or more including ENGL 101 and COMM 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Supervised field experience in a variety of settings related to the healthcare field, including educational institutions, governmental agencies, and public and private health care facilities. Students will receive on-the-job experience, in a volunteer or paid capacity, for at least five hours per week (a total of 75 hours per semester equals one internship credit hour) to gain practical skills and experience. 1-6 credit hours

HONR 101: Honors Seminar I

Prerequisite(s):
-Admission to Heartland Community College Honors Program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will introduce students to college life at HCC as an honors student with an emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, oral and written communication, and understanding diversity in a global context. The course will also afford students a chance to engage in academic work outside the formal classroom such as community service, service learning, field trips, or other similar experiences. Finally, this course will give students an opportunity to explore specific, timely, complex, and cross-disciplinary course content as determined by the instructor and influenced by the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society of the Two Year College study topics. 1-3 credit hours

HONR 201: Honors Seminar II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Prerequisite: Admission into HCC Honors Program and sophomore standing. Through classroom and a variety of individualized experiences, this course will give honors students at HCC the opportunity to design, create, and publicly present original work that reflects their understanding of what it means to be an educated person, a scholar, and a responsible citizen. The course requires a final presentation that demonstrates a synthesis of the student’s experiences in the Honors Program and their learning about themselves, their discipline, and the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society of the Two Year College’s study topic relevant to their time in the program. 1-3 credit hours

HUMA 100: Cultural Tour

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

An introduction to major art forms, including music, art, painting, sculpture and architecture through travel to various countries or regions of the United States. These arts will be considered by examining the constituent elements and formal qualities that are characteristic of the art form as well as by studying their relationship to one another and to the societies from which they developed. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities and Fine Arts

HUMA 101: Introduction to the Humanities

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Introduction to the Humanities is the study of social and cultural values as expressed through the major art forms, including painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, music, dance, film, and photography. The course will examine the elements and formal qualities that are characteristic of each art form, the relationships between the arts, and the social and historical contexts from which they developed. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - HF 900

IAI Humanities and Fine Arts

HUMA 201: Western Humanities I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Discussion and analysis of major cultural achievements of the Western tradition, as expressed in philosophy, religion, art, music, and literature, from earliest times to the Renaissance. Broadly interdisciplinary in approach, this course emphasizes not only the connections between those artistic and literary expressions that Western society has traditionally regarded as significant and the socio-political, economic, and historical conditions that in part gave rise to them, but also the continuing role for the idea of tradition itself as a factor in the intellectual heritage of the West. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - HF 902

IAI Humanities and Fine Arts

HUMA 202: Western Humanities II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Discussion and analysis of major cultural achievements of the Western tradition, as expressed in philosophy, religion, art, music, and literature, from the Renaissance to modern times. Broadly interdisciplinary in approach, this course emphasizes not only the connections between those artistic and literary expressions that Western society has traditionally regarded as significant and the socio-political, economic, and historical conditions that in part gave rise to them, but also the continuing role for the idea of tradition itself as a factor in the intellectual heritage of the West. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - HF 903

IAI Humanities and Fine Arts

HUMA 203: Non-Western Humanities

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Interdisciplinary survey of the significant intellectual and artistic achievements of several non-Western cultures (Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America) through selected works of literature, philosophy, visual art, and music and other performing arts, as well as a comparative examination of their values, motifs, and aesthetics with those of Western cultural expression. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - HF 904N

HUMA 221: American Popular Culture

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college reading

An intensive and critical investigation of contemporary life and values. Includes study of the nature of popular culture in social and political change and social history as reflected in popular music, radio, television, movies, sports, advertising and printed materials intended for a mass audience. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

HUMA 250: Classical Mythology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college reading

An interdisciplinary introduction to classical Greek and Roman mythology, with an emphasis on understanding the varied sources of myths, their cultural context, and their function in society. The course will consider how the characters and events of Classical Mythology have been represented in literature, art, and culture from antiquity to the present. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H9 901

HUMA 290: Culture and Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college reading

Interdisciplinary study tracing the interrelation between culture and science and the impact of science and the natural world on philosophy, religion, and art from ancient to contemporary civilizations. This study includes both classroom and field experiences. 3 credit hours

HUMA 296: Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on a particular topic of cultural and interdisciplinary significance that draws on research from at least two disciplines among the arts, history, languages, literature, philosophy, religion, and cultural studies. The course conducts critical inquiry into cultural expressions, practices, trends, arrangements, and artifacts. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, HUMA 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits toward graduation. 1-3 credit hours

HUMA 299: Internship in the Humanities & Fine Arts

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Completion of 12 credit hours
AND
-Placement at college reading

Supervised field experience in a variety of settings related to the humanities and/or fine arts, including educational institutions, governmental agencies, businesses, and public and private museums, art galleries, and performance centers. Students will receive on-the-job experience in a volunteer or paid capacity for at least five hours a week (a total of 75 hours a semester equals on internship credit hour) to gain practical skills and experience. Work experience must be approved in advance by the internship coordinator. 1-6 credit hours

ILAP 111: Craft Orientation and Safety Training

Prerequisite(s):
-Admittance to the Illinois Laborers & Contractors program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to the construction craft industry. It covers basic information related to health and safety and specific information related to first aid, OSHA, highway workzone safety and hazard communication. Students will review basic math for application in the construction craft industry. 3 credit hours

ILAP 112: Mason Tending

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 111
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. This course provides students the technical knowledge and skills involved with erecting scaffolding, mixing grout and mortar, use of forklifts, and correctly tending the mason. 3 credit hours

ILAP 113: Concrete Practices & Procedures

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 112
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. The contents include concrete practices and procedures, use of tools and power equipment, estimating quantities, and finishing techniques. 3 credit hours

ILAP 114: Asphalt Technology and Construction

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 113
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. The contents include preparation of a subgrade and safe use of equipment to apply and finish an asphalt surface. 3 credit hours

ILAP 121: Asbestos Abatement

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 114
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. Students are prepared for asbestos abatement in a work environment. Additional course topics include federal, state, and local regulatory requirements and the use of personal protective equipment and clothing. 3 credit hours

ILAP 122: Principles of Pipelaying

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 121
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. The contents include trenching and excavation safety, pressure pipe laying techniques, utility line and grade, and gravity flow piping systems. 3 credit hours

ILAP 123: Introduction to Blueprint Reading

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 122
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. Students will learn to interpret information incorporated into an architectural drawing; it is necessary to learn to read a ruler and scales and be able to use and convert between different scales and measurement systems. Course will examine plans, elevations, and sections, detail and assembly drawings, and structural, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical drawings. 3 credit hours

ILAP 131: Basic Surveying

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 123
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. The contents include basic construction surveying, line and grade checking, and laser tracking leveling. 3 credit hours

ILAP 132: Bridge Construction

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 131
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes lecture, lab and work experience. The contents focus on worker and workplace safety. Topics include personal protective equipment, electrical and excavation hazards, scaffolding, hoisting, and rigging. 3 credit hours

ILAP 133: AGC Hazardous Waste Worker

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ILAP 132
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers the types of hazards and situations that may be encountered at a hazardous waste job site, the protective measures and equipment to use, and associated safety and health measures. 4 credit hours

ILAP 211: Laborer Internship I

Prerequisite(s):
-Admittance to the Illinois Laborers & Contractors program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The Laborer Internship is to be repeated each year throughout the three (3) years of the laborer apprentice program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 3 credit hours

ILAP 221: Laborer Internship II

Prerequisite(s):
-Admittance to the Illinois Laborers & Contractors program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The Laborer Internship is to be repeated each year throughout the three (3) years of the laborer apprentice program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 3 credit hours

ILAP 231: Laborer Internship III

Prerequisite(s):
-Admittance to the Illinois Laborers & Contractors program
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The Laborer Internship is to be repeated each year throughout the three (3) years of the laborer apprenticeship program. This course is designed to offer the apprentice valuable field experience. 3 credit hours

INDP 297: Independent Study

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Advanced study, special project, or experiment, under supervision of an instructor, in an area of special interest to the student. This course provides an opportunity for students to do more advanced or extended work in a subject than current course offerings allow. A minimum of 45 hours of combined classroom/laboratory and supervised study time is required for each hour of credit. A plan, containing information about the nature of the study, criteria for evaluation, semester hours assigned, name of the faculty advisor assigned, and the division chair’s approval must be submitted prior to registration. This plan, along with a copy of the course project and the faculty member’s assessment report, will remain on file in the division office. The student’s transcript will show the discipline in which the independent study was completed, and it will identify the subject of the study. INDP 297 may be repeated once for a total of no more than 6 semester hours credit in independent study. 1-6 credit hours

INTL 107: Survey of British History I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Survey of British history from the early Britons to 1714. Topics covered include early Britons and Roman invasions, emergence of England, Norman conquest and relation with Europe, conquest of Wales, wars between England and Scotland, the War of the Roses, Henry VIII and English Reformation, 1688 Revolution, Parliament, and rise of the House of Windsor. 3 credit hours

INTL 108: Survey of British History II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Survey of British history from 1714 to present. Topics covered include Whigs, Tories, and Walpole as "First Prime Minister," Scotland, Wales and "Celtic Nationalism," the Irish Question, growth of the British Empire in India and North America, American Revolution, Industrial Revolution, Gladstone, Disraeli and Victorian Britain, the rise of the Labour Party, the Irish Revolution, the Common Market, and Britain today. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities and Fine Arts

INTL 113: Civilization and Culture of Latin America

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Interdisciplinary survey of the significant intellectual and artistic achievements of several Latin American cultures through selected works of literature, philosophy, visual art, and music and other performing arts, as well as a comparative examination of their values, motifs, and aesthetics with those of other cultural expressions. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - HF 904N

INTL 210: Introduction to Autobiography and Life Writing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 206 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a continuation of skills learned in ENGL 206 with an emphasis on the creation of autobiography, memoir and other non-fiction writing and publication. Requirements include analysis and practical application of past and current trends in writing and publishing autobiography, memoir and other non-fiction, peer workshops, and a creative portfolio with a critical introduction that demonstrates an understanding of the structure, elements, and critical terminology of autobiography, memoir and non-fiction. Topics to be covered include historical trends and practices, theoretical and cultural influences, contemporary (autobiography, memoir and) non-fiction practices, requirements for interaction in workshops, and analysis of current publication opportunities. 3 credit hours

INTL 213: Survey of Art History

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A study of the principal achievements in painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts from prehistoric times to the present. Focus will be on the interaction between the fine arts, architecture, and industrial design. For study abroad program only. 3 credit hours

INTL 242: British Culture and Society

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An examination of contemporary social, cultural, and political life in Britain, focusing on such subjects as the Monarchy and Parliament, the political parties and the electoral systems, media, art and architecture, leisure and humor, the idea of "class," educational system, trade unions, and geographical diversity. For study abroad program only. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

INTL 272: Latin American & Caribbean Literature

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Reading and analysis of representative masterpieces from Latin America and the Caribbean. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H3 908N

INTL 283: Non-Silver Processes in Photography

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ART 180 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will introduce the student to alternative methods to the ubiquitous silver print in photography today. Areas explored will include, but will not be limited to, Platinum/Palladium, Cyanotypes, Van Dyke Brown, and Salted Paper Prints. 3 credit hours

ITAL 101: Italian I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This beginning course is designed to develop elementary proficiency in listening, reading, writing and speaking in Italian. Course content includes basic vocabulary, essentials of Italian grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, the use of actual speech patterns, and basic elements of Italian culture. 4 credit hours

ITAL 102: Italian II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ITAL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The purpose of this course is to continue the development of proficiency in the four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) in Italian. Students will be able to communicate with an Italian native speaker on a variety of everyday topics, using proper polite expressions and structures, as well as becoming familiar with the characteristics of Italian culture and becoming developing awareness of current events and issues in Italy. 4 credit hours

ITAL 201: Italian III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ITAL 102 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an intermediate-level course for third semester Italian students. Its purpose is to help students gain proficiency in the four language skills (listening, speaking, writing and reading) and develop a strong sense of grammatical accuracy. ITAL 201 is designed to build fluency and accuracy in the language, improve reading and listening skills, and increase knowledge of the Italian culture. 4 credit hours

IAI Humanities

ITAL 202: Italian IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ITAL 201 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an intermediate-level course for fourth semester Italian students. Its purpose is to help students gain proficiency through extensive practice in conversation, writing and reading of selected texts, while implementing vocabulary, improving grammar structure accuracy and increasing knowledge of the Italian culture. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H1 900

JAPN 101: Japanese I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A beginning course in Japanese, with emphasis on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Basic vocabulary, essentials of Japanese grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, and the use of actual speech patterns are covered. Students with two or more years of high school Japanese should not enroll in JAPN 101. 4 credit hours

JAPN 102: Japanese II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of JAPN 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A continuation of JAPN 101 with emphasis on expanding the basic conversational vocabulary and more detailed study of grammatical principles and syntactic patterns. 4 credit hours

JAPN 201: Japanese III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of JAPN 102
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive practice in conversation and composition, combined with a review of grammatical and syntactic principles to improve speaking skills, oral composition, and the reading and writing of Romaji script, additional kan’ji, and the kana syllabaries. 4 credit hours

IAI Humanities

JAPN 202: Japanese IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of JAPN 201
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Continued practice in oral and written expression, with an emphasis on the development of vocabulary and syntax necessary for sustained conversation in Japanese. A final review of grammar is combined with composition exercises based on readings about Japanese culture and society. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H1 900

MAIN 101: Industrial Electricity and Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of TMAT 103 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Industrial Electricity and Systems is a basic course in the operation, characteristics, and applications of industrial electricity and industrial systems. This course covers function and practice of industrial controls in systems such as fluid power, mechanical, and electrical. This course stresses the theory and practice of industrial electricity as it relates to industrial systems and other technological fields. 3 credit hours

MAIN 102: Mechanical Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course examines general mechanical and physics principles and how they apply to common mechanical devices. Students will also experience hands-on sessions where they will install and maintain mechanical equipment. 3 credit hours

MAIN 104: Air Conditioning and Refrigeration

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course introduces general air conditioning and refrigeration principles and how they are applied in industrial facilities. The course also includes the operation and maintenance of the individual components and functions of industrial cooling equipment. 3 credit hours

MAIN 201: Electrical Wiring and Maintenance

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MAIN 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers electrical safety and components; includes principles of installation of electrical circuits within a facility. Labs emphasize principles of component selection, installation and maintenance of electrical distribution systems. 3 credit hours

MAIN 202: Fluid Power Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of TMAT 103
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course examines basic fluid power theories and advantages, schematic reading and development, equipment specification and installation, and maintenance and rebuilding of individual components. Troubleshooting techniques will be emphasized. 3 credit hours

MAIN 220: Mechatronics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 206, ELTC 207, or MAIN 222
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers electrical and mechanical integration, repairing and installation of advanced automation. The course includes robotic operations, safety, and maintenance. 3 credit hours

MAIN 221: Heating Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course covers theory, operation, and maintenance of residential and industrial heating systems. Topics include boilers, forced air furnaces, their operation, disassembly, inspection, and repair. Preventative maintenance procedures and regulations governing maintenance programs are also discussed. 3 credit hours

MAIN 222: Industrial Controllers

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MAIN 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers the application and programming of programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Topics include: theory and operation of controllers; and ladder logic program development and implementation. 3 credit hours

MATH 91: Prealgebra

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at MATH 091

This course is designed for students who need to develop their math skills prior to taking transfer level mathematics. Topics include: whole numbers, integers, solving equations with integers, solving advanced linear equations, fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, ratios, and proportions. 4 credit hours

MATH 92: Elementary Algebra

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 091 OR
-Placement at MATH 092

This course is designed for students who need to develop their math skills prior to taking transfer level mathematics. Topics include: percent, order of operations, solving linear equations, lines, graphing, exponents, polynomials, factoring. 4 credit hours

MATH 93: Intermediate Algebra (Level 1)

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093

This course is designed for students who need to develop their math skills prior to taking college level mathematics. Topics include: rational expressions, functions, radical expressions, and linear systems. 4 credit hours

MATH 94: Intermediate Algebra (level 2)

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at MATH 094

This course is designed for students who need to develop their math skills prior to taking college level mathematics. Topics include: compound inequalities, systems of equations, complex numbers, and quadratic equations. 4 credit hours

MATH 98: Geometry

Prerequisite(s):
Math 087 with a grade of C or higher or equivalent or assessment.

This course fulfills a geometry requirement for students who have not completed high school geometry. The course includes geometric constructions using a straight-edge, protractor, and compass. In addition, it introduces traditional “two-column” proofs; such proofs reinforce higher-order logical skills that are important in many professions. Topics include triangles, polygons, similarity, Pythagoras’ Theorem, and circles. 3 credit hours

MATH 106: College Algebra for Bus & Soc Sci

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math

A brief review of basic algebraic concepts and introduction to more advanced concepts. Topics are viewed graphically, as well as algebraically. Topics include graphing and solving linear, logarithmic, exponential, polynomial, power, radical, and rational functions, systems of linear equations, and application problems. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI 83+). 4 credit hours

MATH 109: College Algebra for Math & Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 094 OR
-Placement at MATH 109/128 OR
-An ACT score of 23 or higher in math within the past two years

The main concept of this course is the notion of a function. Polynomial, radical, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions are studied from a symbolic, as well as graphical perspective. The course is intended to prepare college students for studying Calculus. Graphing utilities are used extensively as learning tools. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI 89). 4 credit hours

IAI Mathematics

MATH 111: Finite Math for Business and Social Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 106 or MATH 109 with a grade of C or better

This class focuses on applications of the following topics: matrices, matrix algebra, linear programming, sets and counting techniques, probability, and the mathematics of finance. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI 83+). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 906

MATH 128: Trigonometry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 094 OR
-Placement at MATH 109/128 OR
-An ACT score of 23 or higher in math within the past two years

This course begins with a definition of the six trigonometric functions. The course work follows an investigation of these functions, their graphs, their relationships to one another, and ways in which they can be used in a variety of applications. Specific applications include triangles, vectors, polar coordinates and equations. The course is designed to equip students with an understanding of trigonometry necessary for the study of calculus. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI 89). 3 credit hours

IAI Mathematics

MATH 131: Explorations in Mathematics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math

This course focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills and appreciation. Three or four topics are studied in depth, with at least three chosen from the following list: counting techniques and probability, graph theory, logic/set theory, mathematical modeling, mathematics of finance, game theory, linear programming, and statistics. A scientific or graphic calculator are required for this course. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 904

MATH 135: Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math

This course focuses on mathematical reasoning and problem solving and provides instruction in the teaching of mathematics at the elementary grade level. Topics include properties of whole numbers and rational numbers, the four basic arithmetic operations, and problem solving through various representations including algebraic. 3 credit hours

IAI Mathematics

MATH 136: Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 135 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean

This course focuses on mathematical reasoning and problem solving; and provides instruction in teaching mathematics at the elementary grade level. Topics include algebra, probability, statistics, geometry, measurement, and the use of technology in the elementary school classroom. A scientific calculator is required for this course (a graphing calculator is also acceptable). 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 903

IAI Mathematics

MATH 141: Introduction to Statistics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 093 OR
-Placement at college level math

This course focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills and appreciation. Descriptive methods (frequency distributions, graphing and measures of location and variation), basic probability theory (sample spaces, counting, factorials, combinations, permutations, and probability laws), probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distribution, and random samples and sampling techniques), statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test, and chi-square test, and errors), correlation and regression, and f-test and analysis of variance. An emphasis is placed on calculating statistical results using appropriate technology, and interpreting those results in context, rather than using formulas and tables. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 902

IAI Mathematics

MATH 142: Business Statistics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 106 or MATH 109 with a grade of C or better

MATH 142 emphasizes problem solving of statistics applications to business. Topics include descriptive statistics (sampling techniques, organizing and presenting data as frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and variability), probability theory (sample spaces, counting techniques, and probability laws), probability distributions (e.g., Normal, Binomial, F, and Chi-Square distributions), and inferential statistics (estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis). Note, a graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI 83+). This course is not intended for a Mathematics major or minor. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 902
IAI Major Code - BUS 901

IAI Mathematics

MATH 151: Calculus for Business & Social Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 106 or MATH 109 with a grade of C or better OR
-Placement at MATH 151

This calculus course is designed specifically for students in business and the social sciences and does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics. It emphasizes applications of the basic concepts of calculus rather than proofs. Topics include limits; techniques of differentiation applied to polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions (this includes partial derivatives and derivatives of higher order); maxima and minima of functions; elementary techniques of integration including substitution and integration by parts; and applications (business and social science applications are stressed throughout the course). A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI-83+). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 900-B

IAI Mathematics

MATH 161: Calculus I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 109 and MATH 128 with a grade of C or better OR
-Placement at MATH 161

Topics include (but are not limited to) the following: limits and continuity; definition of derivative; rate of change, slope; derivatives of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions; the chain rule; implicit differentials; approximation by differentials; higher order derivatives; Rolle’s Theorem; Mean Value Theorem; applications of the derivative; anti-derivative; L’Hopital’s Rule (0/0 and 8/8); the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus; and area under the curve and Riemann Sums. A graphing calculate is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI-89). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC CODE - M1 900-1
IAI Major Code - MTH 901

IAI Mathematics

MATH 162: Calculus II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 161 with a grade of C or higher

A second course in Calculus. Topics include (but are not limited to) the following: area between two curves, volume, other applications of the integral; techniques of integration, including numerical methods; L’Hopital’s rule (indeterminate forms); improper integrals; sequences and series, convergence tests, Taylor series; parametric equations and polar coordinates. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on TI-89). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 900-2
IAI Major Code - MTH 902

IAI Mathematics

MATH 163: Calculus III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 162 with a grade of C or higher

Topics include (but are not limited to) the following: applications of polar coordinates: area, arc length and conic sections; functions of more than one variable, partial derivatives; the differential, directional derivatives, gradients; double and triple integrals: evaluation and applications. Note, a graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on a TI 89). 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - M1 900-3
IAI Major Code - MTH 903

MATH 271: Linear Algebra

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 162 with a grade of C or higher

This is an introductory course in linear algebra. Topics include vectors, matrices and operations; inverse of a matrix; solution of systems of linear equations; vector spaces and subspaces; linear independence, dependence, and transformations; range and kernel of linear transformations; rank, basis and dimension; determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; inner product spaces and orthogonality. 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - MTH 911

MATH 272: Differential Equations

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 162 with a grade of C or higher

This is an introductory course in differential equations. Topics include linear equations of the first order; linear equations with constant coefficients; the general linear equation; variation of parameters; undetermined coefficients; linear independence; the Wronskian; exact equations; separation of variables; and applications. In addition, the course will cover at least two of the following topics: systems of linear differential equations; solution of Laplace transforms; existence and uniqueness of solutions; solution by power series; oscillation and comparison theorems; partial differential equations; boundary value problems; numerical methods; and stability of solutions. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will be based on the TI-89). 4 credit hours
IAI Major Code - MTH 912

MATH 296: Special Topics in Math

Prerequisite(s):
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Completion of 75% of program requirements
AND
-Culmulative GPA of 3.0 or higher at the time of application for internship
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

Course will offer students an opportunity to study a topic which is (1) unique and infrequently offered as a part of their program curriculum or (2) of special interest to mathematics. Each student wishing to enroll in Special Topics in Mathematics will be reviewed based on (1) previous experience, (2) courses completed, and (3) aptitude/ability match with selected topic. 1-4 credit hours

MATH 297: Independent Study in Mathematics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading
AND
-Completion of MATH 109 OR
-Placement at MATH 128
AND
-Permission of divison dean

Intensive work in an area of mathematics of special interest to the student. Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive written report. 1-4 credit hours

MFTG 115: Manufacturing & Production Processes

This course examines three content areas for production: safety, quality, and manufacturing processes. Students will be exposed to manufacturing concepts and actions that can produce higher quality products, increase productivity, achieve greater customer satisfaction, and assure a safe and healthy work environment. Each of the three areas is broken down with definitions, examples, and exercises. Practical cases and real-world examples are investigated and discussed. Methods of instruction will include online lectures, exercises, labs and projects. 3 credit hours

MFTG 205: Statics & Strength of Materials

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PHYS 161 or TPHY 103
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course serves as an introduction to the strength of materials, methods of determining the stresses and deflections of basic load-carrying members. The laboratory is designed to supplement the classroom presentation and give the student a clearer understanding of the responses of components and structures to external loads. The concept of principle stress is emphasized. 3 credit hours

MFTG 215: Quality Improvement

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course focuses on the fundamentals basic to the control and improvement of quality materials, products, processes, services, and systems. The principles of industrial statistics are applied to the analysis of data, control of product and process, and the evaluation of human resources, materials, equipment, and systems in meeting design specifications for products or services during production end use. 3 credit hours

MFTG 216: Statistical Process Control

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

The course focuses on the fundamentals basic to the control and improvement of quality materials, products, processes, services, and systems. The principles of industrial statistics are applied to the analysis of data, control of product and process. Additionally, the course will cover collection of data, calculation of basic parameters, and the creation, interpretation and application of control charts. 2 credit hours

MSC 101: Introduction to Military Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to the organization, mission, and functions of the Army. Covers the basic problem solving and time management techniques necessary for basic military operations. Also examines the service components and describes how each is important in accomplishing the Army mission. 1 credit hour

MSC 102: Introduction to Leadership & Tactics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to military leadership and basic military skills. Students examine common leadership traits and techniques necessary to accomplish military objectives. Military skills such as map reading and field hygiene are also presented. 1 credit hour

MSC 111: Applied Leadership II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Gives students comprehensive knowledge of all aspects of military land navigation. Covers the grid reference system and how to use it to determine the precise coordinators of any known point. Examines techniques useful for successfully navigating from one known point to the next. 2 credit hours

MSC 112: Introduction to Military Leadership

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Introduction to principles, responsibilities, techniques of military leadership and problems of leadership in the military environment. Students will learn the basic principles of leadership, counseling, and management skills. Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of the Army Noncommissioned Officer (NCO). The effective application of communication skills in solving problems and accomplishing various missions is also included. 2 credit hours

MTRL 101: Basics of Supply Chain Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Students explore the basic concepts in managing the flow of materials in a supply chain. In the basics course students will get a complete overview of material flow, from internal and external suppliers, to and from an organization. 3 credit hours

MTT 101: Machining Skills I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course introduces the student to precision measuring tools, hand tools and their uses for machining and layout. The student will perform basic machining tasks which include the use of drilling machines, bandsaws engines, lathes, and milling machines. 3 credit hours

MTT 110: Tool Design

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MTT 101
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of toolmaking. The student will review designs of basic jigs, gages and fixtures for specific machining applications. Design and fabrication of various tooling will be required. Dimensional accuracy and machining efficiency will be emphasized. 3 credit hours

MTT 201: Machining Skills II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MTT 101
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course covers advanced uses of common types of milling machines, surface grinders, lathes and their accessories. Coursework will also cover the basic use of CNC machines and programming. Students will also learn about basic machine parts, procedures of set-up, and operations of machining for general tool room usage. 3 credit hours

MTT 210: Toolmaking

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MTT 110
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course is a comprehensive study of mass production tooling including punch press dies, roll formers, and injection molds. Emphasis will be placed on die construction and repair/maintenance of production tools. The students will be required to develop and implement a new build or repair procedure for a given die or mold. Dimensional accuracy and machining efficiency will be evaluated. 3 credit hours

MUSI 104: Group Instruction-Basic Guitar

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

An introduction to playing the acoustic guitar, with practice in simple chords and melodies. Previous experience in music and in playing guitar are not required. Students need to furnish their own guitar. 2 credit hours

MUSI 105: Class Piano I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

An introduction to reading and performing keyboard music along with the fundamentals of music theory. Particular focus is on learning and performing musical scales, chords, and short piano pieces. Some goals of this course are to stimulate interest in performing music, to provide information about music fundamentals, and ultimately to enhance each student’s appreciation for music. 2 credit hours

MUSI 106: Class Voice I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

An introduction to reading and performing vocal music with the fundamentals of music theory. Particular focus is on learning and performing musical scales, exercises, and short songs. Some of the goals of this course are to stimulate interest in performing music, to provide information about music fundamentals, and ultimately to enhance each student’s appreciation for music. 2 credit hours

MUSI 110: Music Theory, Keyboard, and Aural Skills

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A beginning course in music theory includes introductory materials in harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods. This is the first in a four-semester sequence of courses in music theory for those intending to major in music. The music theory component includes introductory materials in diatonic and chromatic harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods. The keyboard component involves the performance of major and minor scales and harmonization of simple melodies. Aural skills covered in this course include the sequential development of ear training, sight singing, and dictation. 4 credit hours

MUSI 111: Music Theory, Keyboard, and Aural Skills II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 110
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A course in music theory including introductory materials in harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods. This is the second in a four-semester sequence of courses in music theory for those intending to major in music. The music theory component includes introductory materials in diatonic and chromatic harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods. The keyboard component involves the performance of major and minor scales and harmonization of simple melodies. Aural skills covered in this course include the sequential development of ear training, sight singing, and dictation. 4 credit hours

MUSI 120: Choir

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Repertoire of choral works from the Renaissance to the present, with an emphasis on the students’ vocal development and improved musicianship. No audition required. 1 credit hour

MUSI 145: Jazz Ensemble

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Rehearsal and performance in jazz ensemble. 1 credit hour

IAI Fine Arts

MUSI 150: Music Appreciation

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An introduction to music appreciation and theory for students who do not intend to major in music. This course is designed to provide familiarity with the elements of music and with various musical forms and stylistic periods so the students can actively and perceptively listen to a wide variety of music. The ability to read music is not required for enrollment in MUSI 150. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F1 900

IAI Fine Arts

MUSI 160: Non-Western Music

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A study of representative music of selected cultures of the non-Western world, with an emphasis on understanding music in cultural and social contexts. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F1 903N

MUSI 170: Music History & Literature I: Antiquity to the 18th Century

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course focuses on music as an art in western civilization from Antiquity to 1750, emphasizing the study of representative musical works and styles of major periods of music history: Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque era. Particular attention is given to understanding musical works, aesthetics, and concepts in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. 4 credit hours

MUSI 171: Music History and Literature II: The Classical Era to the Present

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course focuses on music as an art in western civilization from 1750 to the present time, emphasizing the study of representative musical works and styles of major periods of music history. Particular attention is given to understanding musical works, aesthetics, and concepts in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. 4 credit hours

MUSI 196: Applied Music Instruction for Nonmajors

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual music instruction for students on a particular instrument or voice, for 30 or 60 minutes a week. MUSI 196 is for students who do not intend to major in music. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. The lessons are designed to stimulate interest in the respective instrument, in performing music, in learning and applying music fundamentals, and in understanding the aesthetical qualities of music. Graduation credit for nonmajor applied music lessons is limited to four hours. See your academic advisor to register. 1-2 credit hours

MUSI 197: Applied Music Instruction for Nonmajors

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 196 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction for students on a particular instrument or voice, for 30 or 60 minutes a week. MUSI 197 is for students who do not intend to major in music. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. The lessons are designed to stimulate interest in the respective instrument, in performing music, in learning and applying music fundamentals, and in understanding the aesthetical qualities of music. Graduation credit for nonmajor applied music lessons is limited to four hours. See your academic advisor to register. 1-2 credit hours

MUSI 198: Applied Music Instruction for Nonmajors

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 197 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction for students on a particular instrument or voice, for 30 or 60 minutes a week. MUSI 198 is for students who do not intend to major in music. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. The lessons are designed to stimulate interest in the respective instrument, in performing music, in learning and applying music fundamentals, and in understanding the aesthetical qualities of music. Graduation credit for nonmajor applied music lessons is limited to four hours. See your academic advisor to register 1-2 credit hours

MUSI 199: Applied Music Instruction for Nonmajors

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 198 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction for students on a particular instrument or voice, for 30 or 60 minutes a week. MUSI 199 is for students who do not intend to major in music. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. The lessons are designed to stimulate interest in the respective instrument, in performing music, in learning and applying music fundamentals, and in understanding the aesthetical qualities of music. Graduation credit for nonmajor applied music lessons is limited to four hours. See your academic advisor to register. 1-2 credit hours

MUSI 200: Applied Instruction in Music

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction in voice or a particular instrument for 60 minutes a week. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. MUSI 200 lessons are designed for students who intend to major in music in a bachelor’s degree program. The lessons will incorporate representative solo and study materials for the respective instrument and will guide the student in acquiring a basic knowledge of the care and use of the instrument, knowledge and interpretation of the appropriate literature for the instrument, and performance skills, including both preparation and opportunities for public performance. Both attendance and performance at student recitals are required. Performance evaluation is juried. Graduation credit for applied lessons for music majors is limited to eight hours. See your academic advisor to register. 2 credit hours

MUSI 201: Applied Instruction in Music

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 200 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction in voice or a particular instrument for 60 minutes a week. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. MUSI 201 lessons are designed for students who intend to major in music in a bachelor’s degree program. The lessons will incorporate representative solo and study materials for the respective instrument and will guide the student in acquiring a basic knowledge of the care and use of the instrument, knowledge and interpretation of the appropriate literature for the instrument, and performance skills, including both preparation and opportunities for public performance. Both attendance and performance at student recitals are required. Performance evaluation is juried. Graduation credit for applied lessons for music majors is limited to eight hours. See your academic advisor to register. 2 credit hours

MUSI 202: Applied Instruction in Music

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 201 with a grade of C or better
AND-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction in voice or a particular instrument for 60 minutes a week. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. MUSI 202 lessons are designed for students who intend to major in music in a bachelor’s degree program. The lessons will incorporate representative solo and study materials for the respective instrument and will guide the student in acquiring a basic knowledge of the care and use of the instrument, knowledge and interpretation of the appropriate literature for the instrument, and performance skills, including both preparation and opportunities for public performance. Both attendance and performance at student recitals are required. Performance evaluation is juried. Graduation credit for applied lessons for music majors is limited to eight hours. See your academic advisor to register. 2 credit hours

MUSI 203: Applied Instruction in Music

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 202 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Individual instruction in voice or a particular instrument for 60 minutes a week. The lessons will be appropriate for the skill of the student. MUSI 203 lessons are designed for students who intend to major in music in a bachelor’s degree program. The lessons will incorporate representative solo and study materials for the respective instrument and will guide the student in acquiring a basic knowledge of the care and use of the instrument, knowledge and interpretation of the appropriate literature for the instrument, and performance skills, including both preparation and opportunities for public performance. Both attendance and performance at student recitals are required. Performance evaluation is juried. Graduation credit for applied lessons for music majors is limited to eight hours.See your academic advisor to register. 2 credit hours

MUSI 210: Music Theory, Keyboard, and Aural Skills III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 111
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A course in music theory with focus on intermediate materials in harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods. This is the third in a four-semester sequence of courses in music theory for those intending to major in music. The music theory component includes intermediate materials in diatonic and chromatic harmony, dissonance in tonal music, contrapuntal techniques, form, analysis and compositional methods. The keyboard component involves the performance of major, minor, and chromatic scales and harmonization of chromatic melodies. Aural skills covered in this course include the sequential development of ear training, sight singing, and dictation. 4 credit hours

MUSI 211: Music Theory, Keyboard, and Aural Skills IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MUSI 210
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A course in music theory with focus on advanced materials in harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods. This is the fourth in a four-semester sequence of courses in music theory for those intending to major in music. The music theory component includes advanced materials in modal and chromatic harmony, form, analysis and compositional methods with particular emphasis on late nineteenth and twentieth-century techniques. The keyboard component involves the performance of major, minor, and chromatic scales and arpeggios and harmonization of chromatic, modal, and atonal melodies. Aural skills covered in this course include the sequential development of ear training, sight singing, and dictation. 4 credit hours

IAI Fine Arts

MUSI 260: Jazz, Blues and Rock ’N’ Roll

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An exploratory history of various types and styles of African-American music in the United States and the Caribbean which manifested themselves in the forms of blues, jazz, rock ’n’ roll, and other related musical types. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F1 905D

MUSI 296: Special Topics in Music

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an advanced course in music with variable content that is focused on research, theory, and application in a particular area of music (such as critical theory and the study of music, theory and practice of the blues, film music, etc.). Readings will center on current developments in the study of music and may have an interdisciplinary, social, scientific, ethnographic, and/or critical perspective. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, MUSI 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits toward graduation. 1-3 credit hours

NETW 121: Introduction to Networks

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 150 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This is the first of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. This course is designed to be integrated into technology curricula or continuing education programs at postsecondary institutions such as technical schools and universities. Instruction includes, but is not limited to: networking, LANs, WANs, OSI models, routers, router programming, topologies, and IP addressing. 3 credit hours

NETW 122: Routing & Switching Essentials

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 121 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This is the second of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction includes, but is not limited to: network terminology and protocols specifications, LANs, WANs, Ethernet, TCP/IP Addressing Protocol, dynamic routing, and the network administrator’s role and function. Particular emphasis is given to the use of problem-solving to solve networking problems. 3 credit hours

NETW 123: Scaling Networks

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 122 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is the third of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with a comprehensive and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switch network. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, Fast Ethernet, LAN switching methods, LAN segmentation on routers, and switches. The course explains how to configure a switch to implement Virtual LANs, VTP, Inter-VLAN routing and Spanning Tree Protocol in a converged network. 3 credit hours

NETW 124: Connecting Networks

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 123 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is the last of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in network services required applications in enterprise networks. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, Frame Relay features, router commands to monitor and configure Frame Relay LMIs, and subinterfaces. Students will learn how to implement data link protocols and WAN security concepts. 3 credit hours

NETW 150: Workstation Operating Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 101
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course presents the features of a workstation operating system and takes a detailed look at command line based and graphical user interface based microcomputer operating systems. The class will be taught using Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP and DOS in a Windows format. Includes discussion concerning Network Operating Systems and functional criteria for operating system design, job management, task management, data management, resource allocation and dump and trace facilities. 3 credit hours

NETW 151: PC Hardware Maintenance & Repair

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 101
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course covers the common microcomputer hardware maintenance functions. This course is not intended to train experienced technicians but rather to assist the common microcomputer user concerning basic maintenance functions and to determine when to call an expert technician for help. This course also covers basic installation procedures for commercial microcomputer software. 3 credit hours

NETW 160: Introduction to Networking

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of CSCI 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to hardware and software used in data communication and networking. Topics include personal computer hardware, operating systems, connecting to a network and the Internet, network addressing, network services, wireless technology, basic security and troubleshooting. This course provides a knowledge base of networking concepts and terminology in preparation for more advanced study of networks with a basic understanding of digital data and communications. Practical experience with networks is part of the course. 3 credit hours

NETW 162: Networking Technologies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 150 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the TCP/IP protocol stack including its history, development, current applications, and future implications. This will include the presentation of both the TCP/IP model of networking and the OSI Reference Model. It also helps students as a beginning technical course for more advanced networking courses. Topics are basic TCP/IP functionality and how it relates to the OSI Reference Model, related LAN and WAN protocols, TCP/IP network addressing, security, routing, monitoring and managing IP networks. 4 credit hours

NETW 166: Windows Workstation Administration

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 150 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course prepares students to setup and support the Microsoft Windows workstation operating system. It also helps prepare students for the related Microsoft certification exam. 3 credit hours

NETW 167: Windows Server Administration

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 166 with a grade of C or better OR
-Concurrent enrollment in NETW 166
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course prepares students to install and configure Microsoft Windows Server. Various file systems and disk management functions, administering the operating system, network protocols, and remote access are included. It also helps prepare students for the Microsoft Certified Professional examination. 3 credit hours

NETW 170: Network Security Fundamentals

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 124 or NETW 167 with a grade of C or better:
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the network security for System Administrators, Network Administrators, and IT professionals who implement, manage and troubleshoot existing network and server environments. These skills cover an understanding of general security concepts, communication security, infrastructure security, cryptography and operational & organizational security. This course will help prepare for the CompTIA’s "Security+" certification exam. 3 credit hours

NETW 172: Wireless Networking with Security

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 124 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to introduce students to the topics pertaining to the Cisco Wireless LAN Support Specialist certification. The course will introduce and extend the student’s knowledge of and practical experience with wireless networks. The concepts covered in this course will help individuals develop practical experience in skills related to designing, planning, and implementing wireless networks. Also covered in this course will be in-depth discussions of the continued operation and troubleshooting of wireless networking security. 3 credit hours

NETW 181: UNIX Fundamentals

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 162
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course covers fundamental command-line features of the UNIX environment including file system navigation, file permissions, the vi text editor, command shells, and basic network use. 3 credit hours

NETW 182: Linux Administration

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 150 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The goal of this course is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for System Administrators, Network Administrators, and IT professionals who install, configure, manage, and support Linux networks. This course helps prepare for the Linux + Certification Exam. 3 credit hours

NETW 183: Linux Security

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 182 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The goal of this course is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for managing and implementing Linux networking and security. The course introduces networking and security technologies and protocols, and then moves into configuring a Linux network using a variety of command line and graphical utilities. 3 credit hours

NETW 208: Data and Cabling Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NETW 121 or NETW 160
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Data and Cabling Systems is the study of operation, characteristics, and applications of data cabling. Students will study safety, troubleshooting and installation of various data cabling systems. The student will be introduced to current cabling methods and emerging cabling technologies. 3 credit hours

NETW 221: Advanced Routing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 124 with a grade of C or better OR
-Active CCNA Certificate
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is one of several advanced courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction focuses on advanced routing and using Cisco routers connected in local-area networks (LANs) and wide-area networks (WANs) typically found at medium to large network sites. 3 credit hours

NETW 223: Advanced Switching

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 124, NETW 221, or NETW 222 OR
-Active CCNA Certificate
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is one of several advanced courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction focuses on advanced switching and using Cisco switches connected in campus networks and WANs typically found at medium to large network sites. 3 credit hours

NETW 261: Windows Network Infrastructure

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 167 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The goal of this course is to provide the knowledge required by System Administrators, Network Administrators, and IT professionals who install, configure, manage, and support a network infrastructure that uses the Windows® server products. This course helps prepare for the related Microsoft certification exam. 3 credit hours

NETW 262: Windows Directory Services

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 167 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The goal of this course is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for System Administrators, Network Administrators, and IT professionals who install, configure, manage, and support network directory services. This course helps prepare for the MCSE Exam, Implementing and Administering a Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services Infrastructure. 3 credit hours

NETW 271: Cisco Router Security

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 122
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an advanced course in the CISCO Networking Curriculum. The course is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in securing Cisco Routers and interrelated networks. Instruction will focus on network security essentials, attack threats and basic router management. Secure router administration, authentication, configuring RADIUS and TACACS+ servers, access lists, cryptography along with intrusion detection and VPN configuration will also be covered. 3 credit hours

NETW 283: Introduction to Voice Over IP

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NETW 124
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to help students focus specifically on the objectives for the CCNA Voice IIUC 640-460 exam. The class is designed to prepare individuals to understand the concepts necessary to connect IP phones to the LAN infrastructure. Students will also be educated in the key voice terms and features of Voice over IP systems. Knowledge of how to configure and apply basic Call Manager Express phone systems will be covered as well as the configuration of gateways and trunks. Students will also be exposed to some of the newest systems for the Smart Business Communications Suite. 3 credit hours

NETW 296: Special Topics in Networking

Prerequisite(s):
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

NETW 296 will offer students an opportunity to study a topic which is (1) unique and infrequently offered as a part of their program curriculum or (2) of special interest to industry. Each student wishing to enroll in Special Topics in Networking will be reviewed based on (1) previous experience, (2) courses completed, and (3) aptitude/ability match with selected topic. 1-4 credit hours

NURS 110: Nursing Assistant

The course prepares individuals to function as nursing assistants in nursing homes, hospitals, and private homes. Basic nursing knowledge and skills required to care for individuals in a manner that respects their dignity will be the focus of this course. The course contains a variety of skills which require fine-motor coordination. Students must also be physically able to lift and transfer patients safely and correctly. Students must submit to authorization for a Live Scan fingerprint (required by Illinois law); a physical exam, TB testing; and a uniform purchase. NURS 110 meets federal and state guidelines for nursing assistant training, and students who successfully complete this course will be eligible to take the competency evaluation required for nursing assistants. 8 credit hours

NURS 112: Introduction to Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the development of the individual as a nursing student and the conceptual and theoretical aspects of nursing practice and health care using Orem’s self-care model. The student will explore the evolution of professional nursing and the foundation of the science and art of nursing. A basic understanding of moral problems and a variety of resolutions, as well as gaining insight to health care delivery issues, understanding the legal parameters of nursing care, and exploring the influences of nursing politics will be developed. 1 credit hour

NURS 113: Medication Principles for Nurses

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed to provide nursing students with a systematic review of medications and various methods of calculating dosages. Students will develop an understanding of basic pharmacology principles and calculation methods to safely administer medications. Topics include basic pharmacology, systems of measurement to safely calculate dosages, and basic medication administration principles. Critical thinking applied to safe administration of medications will be emphasized throughout the course. This course does not fulfill the general education mathematics requirement(s) for either the A.A. degree or the A.S. degree. 1 credit hour

NURS 117: Fundamentals of Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion in or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 181, NURS 112, NURS 113, and PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course in nursing fundamentals builds upon expanded knowledge and skills acquired as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). Orem’s self care model will be utilized by the student to develop and begin using critical thinking pathways. Scientific principles and clinical skills increase in complexity. Campus laboratory experience focuses on continued development of dexterity and proficiency of psychomotor skills. Planned faculty-supervised experiences in the clinical area provide students with the opportunity to implement their knowledge and skill in the provision of direct client care. 8 credit hours

NURS 122: Community-Based Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NURS 112
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course introduces the student to the practice of community health nursing using Orem’s self-care model. The focus is on foundational knowledge required to practice in community settings, including communication, teaching and learning, health promotion, and disease prevention. Quality management and use of power, politics, and public policy will be explored in creating and maintaining new health care delivery systems in the community. 1 credit hour

NURS 134: Nursing Individuals with Chronic Health Problems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 112, NURS 113, NURS 117, and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NURS 122, BIOL 182, and ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The focus of this course is on the nursing care of clients with the most commonly experienced alterations of perfusion, oxygenation, nutrition, elimination, regulatory processes, and integumentary problems. Orem’s self-care model will be utilized by the student to apply critical thinking pathways to the individual with chronic health problems. Clinical skills, based on scientific principles, increase in complexity. Campus laboratory experience focuses on continued development of dexterity and proficiency of psychomotor skills. Planned faculty-supervised experiences in the clinical area will afford students the opportunity to implement their accrued knowledge and skill in providing nursing care. This is an 8-week course which meets 15 hours for 5 hours credit. (Lec 2.5 Lab 2.5) 5 credit hours

NURS 135: Nursing Childbearing/Rearing Families

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 134 and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 182, ENGL 101, and NURS 122
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course of obstetrical and pediatric nursing focuses on the family utilizing Orem’s self-care model. A beginning application of critical thinking pathways will be developed in this specialized content area. The campus laboratory experiences focus on the assessment of the pregnant individual, the newborn, and application of growth and development principles. Planned faculty-supervised experiences in the clinical area, as well as the community, provide students with the opportunity to implement their knowledge and skills. This is an 8-week course which meets 15 hours for 5 hours credit. (Lec 2.5 Lab 2.5) 5 credit hours

NURS 136: Practical Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 122, NURS 135, BIOL 182, ENGL 101, and PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The focus of this course is the provision of nursing care to adult clients with acute and chronic health problems of the most commonly experienced alterations in sexuality, immunologic responses, mobility, sensori-neural processes, and mental health. Orem’s self-care model will be used as a foundation for nursing practice. Students are provided a faculty-supervised opportunity to utilize the nursing process, nursing skills, and theoretical knowledge in an acute care setting. The standards of practical nursing as set forth by the state of Illinois are presented. After successful completion of NURS 136, the student will be able to proceed to NCLEX-PN examination. This is an 8-week course which meets 18 hours for 6 hours credit. (Lec 3 Lab 3) 6 credit hours

NURS 165: IV Therapy for LPN’s

Prerequisite(s):
-Currently a State of Illinois Licensed Practical Nurse
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course is designed to provide LPNs with the knowledge and skills necessary to safely administer intravenous therapy under the direction of a registered nurse, physician or dentist. Content to be covered includes basic anatomy and physiology, use of equipment, the processes of venipuncture, maintenance and discontinuance of intravenous flow, as well as the legal aspects of intravenous therapy. The course includes faculty-supervised laboratory application of selected skills in an acute care setting. This course meets 2.5 hours for 2 hours credit. (Lec 1.5 Lab .5) 2 credit hours

NURS 232: Leadership & Management in Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 122, NURS 135, BIOL 182, ENGL 101, and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NURS 240, NURS 241, BIOL 191, and ENGL 102
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The need for awareness of economic, political, and regulatory forces that impact the delivery of care will be considered in light of the nursing role in the management of care. Students will examine systems and mechanisms of case management, effective delegation, teamwork strategies, and evaluation of allied personnel. They will explore change theory as a means to develop personal strategies to facilitate and support changes in health care delivery that will result in quality outcomes for clients. 1 credit hour

NURS 240: Mental Health Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 122, NURS 135, BIOL 182, ENGL 101, and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NURS 232, BIOL 191, and ENGL 102
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The focus of this course is provision of nursing care to children and adults with alterations in mental health. Orem’s self-care model will be used to apply critical thinking pathways to the individual with acute and chronic mental health problems. Case studies and audiovisuals will be used in the campus laboratory to enhance student learning. Planned faculty-supervised clinical experiences in a variety of community settings in addition to observational experiences will provide students with the opportunity to implement their accrued knowledge and skills with individuals of varying problems and age groups. This is an 8-week course which meets 12 hours for 4 hours credit. (Lec 2 Lab 2) 4 credit hours

NURS 241: Nursing Care of Individuals with Acute Health Problems I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 122, NURS 240, BIOL 182, ENGL 101, and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NURS 232, BIOL 191, and ENGL 102
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course in medical-surgical nursing focuses on clients with alterations in mobility, regulatory processes, sensori-neural processes and sensory deprivation. Orem’s self-care model will be utilized by the student to apply critical thinking pathways to the individual with acute health problems. Scientific principles and clinical skills increase in complexity. Campus laboratory experiences enhance the development of increased dexterity and proficiency of techniques. Planned faculty-supervised experiences in acute care facilities provide students with the opportunity to implement their accrued knowledge and skill in providing nursing care. Clinical experiences are completed by observational experiences in specialty areas. This is an 8-week course which meets 12 hours for 4 hours credit. (Lec 2 Lab 2) 4 credit hours

NURS 242: Contemporary Nursing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 232, NURS 241, BIOL 191, and ENGL 102
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NURS 245, COMM 101, and SOC 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed to reinforce previously learned concepts and introduce new concepts that are essential for entry into the practice of professional nursing. There will be an emphasis on the characteristics of health care delivery worldwide. Student development will be a continuing focus as students evaluate strategies to secure positions in nursing that are compatible with personal capabilities. Legal requirements for entry into practice will be reviewed. Elements of role transition will be examined as well as techniques of professional collegial relationships, networking skills, and life long learning. 1 credit hour

NURS 245: Nursing Care of Individuals with Acute Health Problems II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 232, NURS 241, BIOL 191, ENGL 102, and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in COMM 101, NURS 242, and SOC 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course in medical-surgical nursing focuses on clients with acute alterations in oxygenation, perfusion, nutrition and sexuality. Critical thinking pathways will be applied holistically utilizing Orem’s self-care model when caring for individuals with acute health problems. Campus laboratory experiences allow the student to practice more complex psychomotor skills. Planned faculty-supervised experiences in acute care facilities provide the student the opportunity to implement a more sophisticated knowledge base and skill level. The students also plan and deliver a supervised group health teaching project in the community. Clinical experiences are complemented by observational experiences in specialty areas. This is an 8-week course which meets 15 hours for 5 hours credit. (Lec 2.5 Lab 2.5) 5 credit hours

NURS 246: Nursing Care of the Individual with Complex Health Problems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of NURS 232, NURS 245, BIOL 182, BIOL 191, ENGL 102, and PSY 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in COMM 101, NURS 242, and SOC 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course in medical-surgical nursing focuses on clients with complex alterations in nutrition, regulatory processes, and immunological functioning. Critical thinking pathways will be chosen using Orem’s self-care model when caring for individuals and families with complex health problems. Faculty-supervised campus laboratory and clinical experiences will provide an opportunity for students to analyze the depth and breadth of the nursing role in complex situations in health care. Planned faculty-supervised experiences in acute care facilities provide students with the opportunity to implement leadership and management concepts with their peers, as well as providing care to individuals with complex health problems. This is an 8-week course which meets 15 hours for 5 hours credit. 5 credit hours

NURS 250: Adult Health Assessment

Prerequisite(s):
-State of Illinois RN or LPN license OR
-Completion of NURS 241
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

A course in the health assessment of the adult client using a systems approach, while providing a foundation for assessment and diagnosis utilizing the nursing process. Campus laboratory experiences with partners will provide students the opportunity to implement their knowledge and skills in assessing the adult client. This course meets 3 hours for 2 hours credit. 2 credit hours

OTEC 101: Keyboarding

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

An introductory course in business technology designed to develop basic data input skills. The course provides instruction in keyboard and machine control techniques. Emphasis is placed on correct skill building. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken OTEC 103. 1 credit hour

OTEC 102: Advanced Keyboarding

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of OTEC 101 OR
-Passing OTEC 101 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

An introductory course in office technology designed to develop basic word processing skills. Emphasis is placed on efficient use of the most popular word processing software package. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken OTEC 103. 1 credit hour

OTEC 104: Office Simulation

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course involves all phases of general office work, including creating and maintaining common office forms (paper and electronic using appropriate software); answering multiline telephone systems and taking and routing messages; operating, maintaining, and troubleshooting common business machines; and calendaring and managing time. This course should prepare Office Basics students with practical skills for all phases of office work and issues relevant to office work ethics. 2 credit hours

OTEC 113: Records Management

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of one of the following with a grade of C or better: ACSM 101, ACSM 120, BUSN 130, or CSCI 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

You will be introduced to the management of records. You will study electronic/image/physical records and files, equipment, procedures, records and information management (RIM) programs and software, and the storing, retrieving, and transferring of records using alphabetic, subject, numeric, and geographic methods. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously completed OTEC 112. 2 credit hours

OTEC 140: Advanced Office Procedures & Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BUSN 115 and OTEC 104
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is your capstone course for the Office Administrative Professional AAS degree. Topics you will study include proofreading and editing skills, advanced use of electronic forms, creating and managing digital and social media presence, project management skills and technology, cloud computing, mobile technology, virtual assisting, presenting business information, making and managing travel arrangements, preparing for meetings and conferences, and emerging office technologies. 3 credit hours

OTEC 296: Topics in Office Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will offer students an opportunity to study a special topic or current issue which is unique and infrequently offered as part of their program. The course is intended to familiarize students with some of the latest trends in office technology. The topic will be announced in the schedule book. Because topics studied will change each semester, OTEC 296 may be repeated up to a total of 6 credit hours. 1-6 credit hours

IAI Humanities

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to philosophical questioning and to the rudiments of philosophical ways of reasoning. This course will examine some key notions of the history of philosophy, especially in the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and social/political philosophy. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H4 900

IAI Humanities

PHIL 105: Introduction to Non-Western Philosophy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An introduction to non-western philosophical questioning and to the rudiments of non-western philosophical ways of reasoning. This course will examine some key notions of the history of non-western philosophy, especially in the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and social/political philosophy, in particular the traditions found in Africa, India, Eastern Asia, and the Mideast. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H4 903N

IAI Humanities

PHIL 111: Logic

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to the forms of inductive and deductive reasoning including modern symbolic logic. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H4 906

IAI Humanities

PHIL 114: Ethics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to the study of moral philosophy. This course will provide an introductory historical survey of the major ethical systems and will consider their application to contemporary moral problems. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H4 904

IAI Humanities

PHIL 201: History of Philosophy I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An introduction to the history of philosophy from the ancient Greeks to the end of the medieval era. This course will examine key ideas of various major philosophers from the Western tradition including the philosophers of Athens (the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, the Sophists, Plato, and Aristotle), the Hellenistic philosophers (the Epicureans, Stoics, and Skeptics), and the medieval religious philosophers (Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas). 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H4 901

IAI Humanities

PHIL 202: History of Philosophy II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to the history of philosophy from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present. This course will examine key ideas of various major philosophers from the Western tradition including the philosophers of the early modern period (Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant), of the nineteenth century (Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and the utilitarians), and various movements in twentieth-century philosophy (pragmatism, logical atomism, logical positivism, ordinary language philosophy, and phenomenology). 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H4 902

PHIL 214: Healthcare Ethics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to important theories in moral philosophy and important issues in healthcare ethics. Students will learn to use ethical theories and philosophical concepts to evaluate various perspectives on issues such as professional conduct, patients’ rights, privacy, genetic engineering, death and dying, euthanasia, and abortion. 3 credit hours

PHIL 296: Studies in Philosophy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introductory philosophy course with variable content that focuses on an area of philosophy such as Philosophy of Religion, Feminist Philosophy, non-Western Philosophy, or Existentialism. Students will critically interpret and analyze philosophical texts that are representative of a particular sub-field of philosophy. Because the subjects and texts will vary each semester, PHIL 296 may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. 3 credit hours

IAI Physical Sciences

PHYS 110: Physics in Everyday Life

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 092 OR
-Placement at MATH 093 or higher OR
-Completion of a college level math course
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed for non-science majors. The fundamentals of physics are introduced by emphasizing a conceptual understanding of the material rather than computational problem solving. Numerous demonstrations and discussions of the applications of physics to everyday phenomena and experiences are used to present the material. Topics include mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, and light. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 900

IAI Physical Sciences

PHYS 161: College Physics I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 109 with a grade of C or better OR
-Placement at MATH 128 or higher
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The first semester of a year-long general physics course, based on mathematics through algebra and trigonometry, but not including calculus. Topics include mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, and sound. Laboratory activities stress development of measurement, observational, and analytical skills, and are based on lecture topics. 5 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P1 900L

PHYS 162: College Physics II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PHYS 161 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The second semester of a year-long general physics course, based on mathematics through algebra and trigonometry, but not including calculus. Topics include electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory activities stress development of measurement, observational, and analytical skills, and are based on lecture topics. 5 credit hours

IAI Physical Sciences

PHYS 171: Mechanics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MATH 161
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 162
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

First course in a calculus-based physics sequence for students in engineering, mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Topics include Newton’s Laws, work and energy, oscillations, transverse waves, systems of particles, and rotations. Laboratory activities stress development of measurement, observational, and analytical skills, and are based on lecture topics. Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 171 and PHYS 161. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - P2 900L

PHYS 172: Electricity & Magnetism

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PHYS 171
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 163
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is the second course in a calculus-based physics sequence for students in engineering, mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Topics include Coulomb’s Law, electric fields, Gauss’ Law, electric potential, capacitance, circuits, magnetic forces and fields, Ampere’s law, induction, electromagnetic waves, polarization, and geometrical optics. Laboratory activities stress development of measurement, observational, and analytical skills, and are based on lecture topics. Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 172 and PHYS 162. 4 credit hours

PHYS 173: Fluids & Thermal Physics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PHYS 171
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 163
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is the third course in a calculus-based physics sequence for students in engineering, mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Topics include fluid motion, propagation of heat and sound, temperature and kinetic theory of gases, heat capacity and latent heat, first law of thermodynamics, heat engines and the second law, and introduction to statistical mechanics. Laboratory activities stress development of measurement, observational, and analytical skills, and are based on lecture topics. Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 173 and PHYS 162. 2 credit hours
IAI Major Code - EGR 913

PHYS 174: Quantum Physics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PHYS 172
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 163
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is the fourth course in a calculus-based physics sequence for students in engineering, mathematics, physics and chemistry. Topics include interference and diffraction, photons and matter waves, the Bohr atom, uncertainty principle, and wave mechanics. Laboratory activities stress development of measurement, observational, and analytical skills, and are based on lecture topics. Students will not receive credit for both PHYS 174 and PHYS 162. 2 credit hours

PHYS 297: Independent Study in Physics

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive work in a physics subject of special interest to the student. Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive written report. 1-3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

POS 101: American Government and Politics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course introduces students to the structures and processes of American government and politics, to the exercise of power, and to value conflicts among key actors in the political process. The course also addresses some of the theoretical underpinnings of the study of American government such as democracy, pluralism and elitism. Finally, the course asks students to apply their learning to interpretations of current political events. Topics for study in the course include: political participation, interest groups, the Constitution, civil liberties, civil rights, the presidency, Congress, the federal court system, the media, political parties, and elections. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S5 900

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

POS 124: State and Local Politics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will explore the role of state and local governments in the US system. Students will explore a variety of theories and models that attempt to explain the power relationships between the federal government and various state and local governments. Course topics include: state constitutions, federalism, governors, state legislatures, state courts, taxing and budgeting, and local government structures. Additionally, students will examine their own roles in state and local communities. Special attention will be given to both the state of Illinois and Bloomington-Normal. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S5 902

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

POS 145: Politics of Mid East, Central/South America, Asia

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

The Middle East, Central and South America and Asia from the standpoint of the politics of international relations, social/economic change, internal factionalism, revolution, warfare and religion. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S5 906N

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

POS 151: International Relations

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

International Relations is an introductory study of the basic principles of politics among nations, encompassing both the dynamics and organizational dimensions of the subject. It includes examination of U.S. foreign policy and the foreign policies of other world powers, plus a survey of important issues and disputes relevant to the balance of power. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S5 904

POS 215: Campaigns and Elections

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will explore the institutions, processes, and activities associated with elections in the US focusing on the Congress and the President. Through directed readings, lecture, discussions, course assignments, and role play exercises students will consider the theories, strategies, and tactics surrounding modern campaigns, including but not limited to, mass media advertising, campaign financing, and candidate debate strategies. Students will study why citizens do or do not vote in elections and they will study whether or not elections matter in the governmental policy making process. 3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

POS 220: Comparative Governments

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An examination of the structure, function, and political processes of selected world governments. The course demonstrates political differences that distinguish one nation’s political institutions from another. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S5 905

POS 250: Activism

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is designed for students who want to develop their skills in doing activism. Course materials, class discussions, guest speakers, educational excursions, and designing and implementing individual, semester-long projects will develop students’ personal philosophies regarding social justice and enhance their abilities to analyze issues and engage in political activism. This course will be cross-listed as COMM 250. 3 credit hours

POS 296: Special Topics in Political Science

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course will provide an in-depth study of selected topics in political science. The content and structure of the course will vary according to the topic and instructor(s). The course may be repeated up to three times with a different topic, for a total of 9 credit hours. Specific topic title will be stated on student’s transcript. 1-3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

PSY 101: Introduction to Psychology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to psychology as the scientific study of human and animal behavior with an emphasis on the factors that influence human behavior and mental processes. This course also focuses on how we may use knowledge and theories of physical and emotional/cognitive growth, learning, personality functioning and coping, and social interactions in our everyday lives. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S6 900

PSY 203: Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an examination of psychological disorders. Students will examine characteristics of various disorders and factors that contribute to their development. In addition, methods used to determine abnormal functioning and treatment approaches will also be explored. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - PSY 905

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

PSY 207: Introduction to Child Psychology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Child psychology is the study of human development from conception to puberty. This course will examine the many environmental and biological factors which shape and influence development and will study many different areas of cognitive, social, emotional and biological development. The contributions of a variety of individuals and schools of thought will be drawn from in order to provide a balanced perspective representing modern psychological understandings. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S6 903

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

PSY 209: Human Growth & Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course examines human development from conception to death with some focus on research methods and developmental theories. This course addresses all the major areas of development (physical, social, emotional and cognitive) and the interaction among these areas. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S6 902

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

PSY 210: Social Psychology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Social Psychology is the study of feelings, motivations, perceptions and behaviors of individuals in social situations. It includes the study of our personal perceptions and attitudes toward others, relationships with others, group influences, and the broader social and cultural factors that influence the behavior of individuals and groups. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S8 900
IAI Major Code - PSY 908

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

PSY 216: Adolescent Psychology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course involves a study of human growth and development across adolescence. Social, physical, intellectual, emotional, and personality growth patterns will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on theories of development, contemporary research, and current issues. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S6 904

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

PSY 217: Adult Development and Aging

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will serve as an introduction to the changes that occur from early adulthood through old age. Topics may include: career choice and development, mate selection and marriage, conventional and nonconventional families, theories of adult personality development, mid- and late-life transitions, aging and dying, and death and bereavement. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S6 905

PSY 220: Personality

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides a critical examination of psychology’s most influential theories as they relate to the study of personality. Theories will include but are not restricted to trait, biological, psychoanalytic, social-behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic. Emphasis will be placed on both the history and current applications of the theory, as well as empirical support. 3 credit hours

PSY 223: Human Sexuality

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course involves the study of the social and psychological aspects of human sexuality. Topics include sexual development, cultural influences, gender, sexual orientation, sexual difficulties, love and relationships. Emphasis will be placed on the mental and emotional aspects of human sexuality as well as current issues. 3 credit hours

PSY 225: Psychology of Relationships

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PSY 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an overview of the psychological research relevant to intimate relationships. Topics include attraction, love, friendship, sexuality, communication, conflict, abuse, and ending relationships. An emphasis will be placed on the research identifying healthy versus unhealthy relationships. 3 credit hours

PTA 100: Introduction to Physical Therapy

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, and PTA 121.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, and PTA 121. This course introduces students to the profession of physical therapy and the role of the physical therapist assistant (PTA) as part of the physical therapist/physical therapist assistant team. It includes the historical background of physical therapy, practice settings, and the role of the American Physical Therapy Association within the profession. Discussions are facilitated about legal and ethical issues, communication, cultural awareness, research and documentation in physical therapy. 1 credit hour

PTA 101: Principles of Patient Care

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120 & PTA 121.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120 & PTA 121. This course will introduce students to patient care activities for patients with orthopedic injury to include bed mobility, transfers and gait training and wheelchair fitting/mobility. In addition, this course also prepares the student to assess ROM, muscle strength, vital signs, manage medical emergencies, document in a medical record, instruct in patient education and comply with isolation techniques. 2 credit hours

PTA 102: Patient Care Skills & Assessment

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, and PTA 121.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, and PTA 121. This course provides the student the opportunity to perform basic patient care skills and data collection discussed in PTA 101 Principles of Patient Care. Clinical case scenarios are utilized for students to develop their skills in communication and clinical problem solving while performing physical therapy data collection/interventions as outlined in the physical therapist’s plan of care. 2 credit hours

PTA 110: Physical Agents in Rehabilitation I

Prerequisite(s):
Prequisites: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 111, PTA 120 & PTA 121.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 111, PTA 120 & PTA 121. This is the first unit of study concerning physical agents utilized in physical therapy. General principles regarding the use of physical agents in the rehabilitation process, review and considerations for implementing the plan of care, along with the role of the physical therapist assistant is explained. Soft tissue techniques, thermal and mechanical agents are explored, and discussion of each intervention includes: purpose/indication, basic physiologic response, precautions, contraindications, safety considerations and application techniques. Methods of data collection and documentation guidelines are also presented. 2 credit hours

PTA 111: Application of Physical Agents I

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 120 & PTA 121.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the PTA program, Completion with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in, PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 120 & PTA 121.This course allows students to apply the physical agents presented in PTA 110 including: massage, fascia release, soft tissue mobilization, moist heat, paraffin, ultrasound, cryotherapy, contrast bath, hydrotherapy, traction, intermittent compression, compression wraps and aseptic technique. Clinical case scenarios are utilized to mimic “real” patient presentation and to promote appropriate review and implementation of the plan of care. In addition proper posturing and draping techniques along with effective communication, clinical decision making and time management are emphasized. Indications, contraindication, precautions and safety consideration regarding the physical agents are also stressed. 1.5 credit hours

PTA 120: Foundations of Therapeutic Exercise

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program and completion with a grade of “C” or better or concurrent enrollment in PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111 and PTA 121.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program and completion with a grade of “C” or better or concurrent enrollment in PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111 and PTA 121. This course provides exercise guidelines for patients with movement disorders. Principles and types of therapeutic exercises along with special consideration of exercise intervention related to tissue & joint injury, healing and postoperative management will be covered. 3 credit hours

PTA 121: Therapeutic Exercise-Orthoped Cond.

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program and completion with a grade of “C” or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111 and PTA 120.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program and completion with a grade of “C” or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111 and PTA 120. This course provides students the opportunity to practice the assessment and exercise techniques discussed in PTA 120 to safely and effectively provide and or progress exercise interventions for patients with orthopedic conditions. 2 credit hours

PTA 140: Clinical Experience 1

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PA 120, and PTA 121 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Admission to PTA program

This course provides clinical opportunity for practical experience in applying knowledge and skill presented in the first year PTA classes. Opportunities are available for students to observe, assist patients and perform physical therapy interventions and data collection under the supervision of a clinical instructor. Classroom presentation is provided prior to clinical experience to discuss appropriate clinical behavior, evidence based practice, ethical guidelines and decision making. 4 credit hours

PTA 210: Physical Agents in Rehabilitation II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PA 120, PTA 121, and PTA 140 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Completion with a C or higher or concurrent enrollment in PTA 211, PTA 220, PTA 221, and PTA 230
AND
-Admission to PTA program

This is the second unit of study concerning physical agents utilized in physical therapy. Foundational information regarding electrical stimulation is presented to prepare the student to explore the clinical application of electrical stimulation for the treatment of pain, edema, tissue damage, impaired joint mobility and muscle disuse atrophy. In addition this course reviews the integumentary system and provides information regarding assessment and treatment of wounds. Documentation guidelines for the interventions are also discussed. 3 credit hours

PTA 211: Application of Physical Agents II

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 220, PTA 221 & PTA 230.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 220, PTA 221 & PTA 230. This course allows students to apply the physical agents presented in PTA 210: electrical stimulation for the treatment of pain, edema, tissue damage, impaired joint mobility and muscle disuse atrophy. The course will promote competency with the following intervention components: selection of specific intervention and/or parameters (within physical therapists plan of care), applying intervention and monitoring patient response, as well as subsequent parameter modifications. Proper positioning and draping of patients are emphasized. Indications, contraindications/precautions and safety are stressed. Communication, problem solving, and time management are also addressed in the delivery of quality patient care. 1.5 credit hours

PTA 220: Concepts in Rehabilitation

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 221& PTA 230.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 221& PTA 230. This course begins with instruction in data collection for patients with spinal pathologies and progresses to understanding the causes, common management methods and rehabilitation of these disorders. The course then focuses on the rehabilitation concepts of motor development, motor learning and motor control to prepare the student to treat the pediatric population and the neurologically impaired patient. Rehabilitative considerations for the patient with amputation are also discussed as well as ADA requirements for accessibility. 4 credit hours

PTA 221: Rehabilitation Techniques

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220 & PTA 230.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220 & PTA 230. This course allows students to apply the rehabilitative techniques discussed in PTA 220. Data collection, exercise interventions along with education/instruction on ergonomics and body mechanics are performed for the patient with spinal disorders. The course shifts to treatment of patients with simulated neurological conditions; interventions consisting of pregait, balance activities, and gait training are utilized or employed. Clinical decision making is emphasized throughout the course with presentation of the material in a clinical case format with an expectation that students will be able to select and modify interventions within the physical therapist’s plan of care. 2 credit hours

PTA 230: PTA Pathophysiology

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220 & PTA 221.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121 & PTA 140 with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220 & PTA 221. This course provides the student with an overview of pathological conditions of the human body. Involved anatomy and/or physiology, as well as etiology, signs and symptoms, prognosis, medical and physical therapy management of the pathologies will be reviewed with specific content related to physical therapy interventions, precautions and contraindications. 3 credit hours

PTA 240: Clinical Experience II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PA 120, PTA 121, PTA 140, PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220, PTA 221, and PTA 230 with a grade of C or higher
AND
-Completion with a C or higher or concurrent enrollment in PTA 250
AND
-Admission to PTA program

This course provides the final clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying all the knowledge and skills presented during all previous PTA courses. Skills are refined under the supervision of a clinical instructor, working toward mastery of clinical skills, critical thinking and professional behaviors required of an entry-level physical therapist assistant. 10 credit hours

PTA 250: Clinical Seminar

Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites: PTA program, completion PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121, PTA 140, PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220, PTA 221 &PTA 230 C or better and completion with a C or better or concurrent enrl in PTA 240.

Prerequisites: Admission to PTA program, completion of PTA 100, PTA 101, PTA 102, PTA 110, PTA 111, PTA 120, PTA 121, PTA 140, PTA 210, PTA 211, PTA 220, PTA 221 &PTA 230 all with a grade of C or better and completion with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in PTA 240. This course is the final stage of preparation for the development of an entry-level PTA. Topics presented in this course include billing/reimbursement, discharge planning, legal issues, sexual harassment and professionalism. Evidence-based practice is examined related to literature search techniques and critically appraising clinical practice articles to determine the validity, impact and applicability to clinical practice. Job searching skills and workforce preparation activities, such as resume development and interviewing skills are reviewed. Elements of role transition to entry-level PTA will be examined related to preparation for licensure examination, career development and life-long learning. 2 credit hours

RAD 111: Fundamentals of Radiologic Sciences I

Prerequisite(s):
-Acceptance into radiography program
AND
-Completion or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 181, RAD 112, and RAD 113
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This is an introductory course in radiologic technology touching briefly on the hospital environment, radiation protection, and medical ethics and law. Also included is an overview of patient care with emphasis on patient communication, cultural diversity, age-specific needs, body mechanics and patient transfer. 2 credit hours

RAD 112: Radiographic Procedures I

Prerequisite(s):
-Acceptance into radiography program
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 181, RAD 111, and RAD 113
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course includes detailed instruction in radiographic anatomy, patient positioning, proper beam-part-image receptor alignment and image analysis for chest, abdomen, upper extremities, shoulder girdle, lower extremities, pelvis and hip. A laboratory component is included. 6 credit hours

RAD 113: Radiography Clinical I

Prerequisite(s):
-Acceptance into radiography program
AND
-Completion of the following with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 181, RAD 111, and RAD 112
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course provides clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying knowledge and skills presented in RAD 111 and RAD 112. Students will observe, assist patients and perform basic radiographic procedures under the direct supervision of an ARRT-registered radiographer. Emphasis is on chest, abdomen, upper extremities, shoulder girdle, bony thorax, pelvis and hip procedures, with clinical competency testing in those areas. 2 credit hours

RAD 121: Fundamentals of Radiologic Sciences II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 181, RAD 111, RAD 112, and RAD 113
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in RAD 122 and RAD 123
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the proper concepts of patient care. This includes information on isolation and sterile techniques, vital signs, tubes, catheters, emergency care, contrast media, basic pharmacology and venipuncture. 3 credit hours

RAD 122: Radiographic Procedures II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 181, RAD 111, RAD 112, and RAD 113
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in RAD 121 and RAD 123
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course includes detailed instruction in radiographic anatomy, patient positioning, proper beam-part-image receptor alignment and image analysis for bony thorax, spinal column, SI joints, scoliosis series, long bone measurement/bone age studies, and fluoroscopic studies of the esophagus, upper gastrointestinal system, and small bowel. A laboratory component is included. 3 credit hours

RAD 123: Radiography Clinical II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 181, RAD 111, RAD 112, and RAD 113
AND
-Completion of the following with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in RAD 121 and RAD 123
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course provides clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying knowledge and skills presented in all RAD courses. Students will assist patients and perform routine radiographic procedures with emphasis on previously learned radiographic procedures, lower extremities, spinal column, SI joints, scoliosis series and long bone measurement/bone age studies. Students assume greater responsibility during exams, continue competency testing and begin working toward mastery of clinical practice. Skills are refined under the direct supervision of an ARRT-registered radiographer. 2 credit hours

RAD 132: Radiographic Procedures III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of RAD 121, RAD 122, and RAD 123
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 182, RAD 133, and RAD 134
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides detailed instruction in radiographic anatomy, patient positioning, proper beam-part-image receptor alignment and image analysis for fluoroscopic studies of the lower GI system, and urinary system. Radiography of the skull, facial bones, mandible, zygomatic arches, temporomandibular joints, nasal bones, paranasal sinuses and orbits will also be included. A laboratory component is included. 6 credit hours

RAD 133: Radiography Clinical III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of RAD 121, RAD 122, and RAD 123
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 182, RAD 132, and RAD 134
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying knowledge and skills. Students will assist patients and perform routine radiographic procedures with emphasis on fluoroscopic studies of the esophagus, upper gastrointestinal system, small bowel, lower GI system, and urinary system. Radiography of the skull, facial bones, mandible, zygomatic arches, temporomandibular joints, nasal bones, paranasal sinuses and orbits, in addition to previously learned radiographic procedures will also be performed. Students assume greater responsibility during exams, continue competency testing and document progress toward mastery of clinical practice. Skills are refined under direct and indirect supervision of an ARRT-registered radiographer. 3 credit hours

RAD 134: Radiographic Imaging I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of RAD 121, RAD 122, and RAD 123
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 182, RAD 132, and RAD 133
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course includes instruction in the multiple energy transformations required for the production of radiographic images. Current imaging equipment and emerging technology are discussed. The nature of ionizing radiation, its control and interactions with the body are included. 3 credit hours

RAD 211: Fundamentals of Radiologic Sciences III

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 182, RAD 121, RAD 122, and RAD 123
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101, RAD 213, RAD, 214, and RAD 215
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course includes an orientation to the processing area, darkroom chemistry, processing procedures, equipment and artifacts. It also requires familiarization with the distinction between optimal and suboptimal quality radiographic images as well as methods of improvement. Quality Control is also mentioned as a way of maintaining optimal quality images. Advanced modalities and emerging technologies are briefly discussed. 3 credit hours

RAD 213: Radiography Clinical IV

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 182, RAD 132, RAD 133, and RAD 134
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101, RAD 211, RAD 214, and RAD 215
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying theories, knowledge and skills presented in all previous RAD courses. Students will assist patients and perform all routine radiographic procedures. Students continue to assume greater responsibility during radiographic exams, continue competency testing and document progress toward mastery of clinical practice under primarily indirect supervision of an ARRT-registered radiographer. 5 credit hours

RAD 214: Radiographic Imaging II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 182, RAD 132, RAD 133, and RAD 134
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101, RAD 211, RAD 213, and RAD 215
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Integrating the information covered in RAD 134, this course deals with the image properties of density, contrast, recorded detail, distortion and all factors affecting these characteristics. Digital and analog image processing, emerging imaging technology and sensitometry are included. A laboratory component is included. 3 credit hours

RAD 215: Cross Sectional Anatomy

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of BIOL 182, RAD 132, RAD 133, and RAD 134
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101, RAD 211, RAD 213, and RAD 214
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an introductory course in cross sectional anatomy. It will provide the basics of head, thorax and abdominal anatomy identification in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes using CT and MRI images and related illustrations. 2 credit hours

RAD 223: Radiography Clinical V

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of the following with a C or better: ENGL 101, RAD 211, RAD 213, RAD 214, and RAD 215
AND
-Concurrent enrollment in RAD 234
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying theories, knowledge and skills presented in all previous RAD courses. Students will assist patients and perform all routine radiographic procedures. Students continue to assume greater responsibility during radiographic exams, continue competency testing and document progress towards mastery of clinical practice under primarily indirect supervision of an ARRT-registered radiographer. 2 credit hours

RAD 233: Radiography Clinical VI

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of RAD 223 and RAD 234 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in a college level math course, RAD 235 and RAD 236
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course provides clinical opportunities for practical experience in applying theories, knowledge and skills presented in all previous RAD courses. Students assume maximum responsibility during exams, complete competency testing, and document mastery of clinical practice. Final proficiency testing is administered under direct supervision of a faculty member or head clinical instructor. 4 credit hours

RAD 234: Radiation Biology and Protection

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101, RAD 211, RAD 213, RAD 214, and RAD 215
AND
-Concurrent enrollment in RAD 223
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course focuses on the effects of ionizing radiation on living tissue. Radiation effects are discussed from the molecular and cellular level to whole body systems. Acute and long term effects are explored. Patient and personnel protection from the effects of ionizing radiation are emphasized. Information discussed includes federal and state radiation health and safety requirements governing the radiology department and personnel, hazards and usefulness of radiation, and the responsibilities of the radiographer. 2 credit hours

RAD 235: Radiographic Pathology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of RAD 223 and RAD 234
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in a college level math course, RAD 233, and RAD 236
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This course introduces concepts related to various disease etiologies and processes, especially as they apply to radiology. Terminology and disease classifications are discussed. The basic manifestations of pathologies of various body systems, including respiratory, digestive, urinary, skeletal, endocrine, cardiovascular, nervous and reproductive, are examined. The course emphasizes the effect of pathology on the technical factors used to obtain a radiographic image and its radiographic appearance. Appropriate radiographic imaging procedures and interventional techniques are identified. 2 credit hours

RAD 236: Radiography Seminar

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of RAD 223 and RAD 234
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in a college level math course, RAD 233, and RAD 235
AND
-Placement at college level English and reading

This is a capstone course intended to integrate the student’s previous learning and provide preparation for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) examination and the workplace. It is an interactive course with an emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving skills. Educational activities are varied and include review of knowledge in the registry content areas, enactment of case scenarios, mock registries, resume writing, job interview skills and competitive games. 2 credit hours

READ 70: Basic Literacy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at READ 070 or higher

Basic Literacy provides students with instruction and practice in essential reading and writing skills at a foundational level. 4 credit hours

READ 90: Reading Improvement I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at READ 090

If placed at two or more developmental levels, concurrent enrollment in or completion of GENS 105 is also required.

Reading Improvement I is an intermediate course in reading and vocabulary development that addresses academic and pleasure reading tasks. Students are provided with instruction and practice that will enable them to become members of a reading community and successfully complete briefer types of readings often utilized in entry-level college courses. 3 credit hours

READ 91: Reading Improvement II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at READ 091 OR
-Completion of READ 090

If placed at two or more developmental levels, concurrent enrollment in or completion of GENS 105 is also required.

Reading Improvement II is an advanced course in reading and vocabulary development that emphasizes academic reading tasks. Students are provided with instruction and practice that will prepare them to successfully meet the full range reading demands typical of entry-level college courses. 3 credit hours

READ 95: Supplemental Reading Lab

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of English and reading placement tests.

Supplemental Reading Lab is designed to improve your ability and efficiency to read and comprehend text independently. Students are provided with instruction and practice in thinking critically using individualized and small group instruction. 4 credit hours

READ 101: College Reading in the Content Areas

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Completion of READ 091

READ 101 is a college-level course in reading and vocabulary development. Students are provided with instruction and practice in efficient information processing strategies that will prepare them to successfully meet the full range of reading demands typical of any undergraduate course. 1 credit hour

REEC 110: Green Building Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of TMAT 103 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Green Building Technology explores construction, maintaining, and managing buildings using sustainable techniques. Topics in this course will include concepts such as: energy efficiency, conservation, construction techniques, health issues associated with a building facility, and incorporating renewable energy into the facility. The OSHA 10 Hour Construction Safety Certificate is embedded into the course work. Students must successfully pass the OSHA 10 Hour Construction Safety exam in order to receive a final grade. The fee for this exam is included as a lab fee for the course. 3 credit hours

REEC 120: Sustainability and Renewable Energy

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

REEC 120 is a course in sustainable practices and renewable energy systems with an emphasis on global issues. This class is designed for a diverse group of students from Foreign Language, Earth Science and Technology to jointly explore a dynamic topic. The course may be taken in conjunction with a ten day immersion of culture, earth and environmental sciences as it applies to sustainable practices and renewable energy systems. Topics will include preserving natural resources, cultural awareness of energy needs and consumption patterns, and exploring a unique perspective on our own domestic energy usage. 3 credit hours

REEC 140: Renewable Energy Concepts I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of REEC 110 and ELTC 102 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Renewable Energy Concepts explores the technologies used in renewable energy systems. The course will cover making, distributing and installing renewable energy systems. Specific systems include, photovoltaic, wind, geothermal, solar heating and biomass. Lab activities will include proper set up and installing renewable energy systems, measure energy usage and controlling renewable energy systems. 3 credit hours

REEC 210: Building Automation

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MAIN 222 with a grade of C or better OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Building Automation explores basics of building envelopes. The course will cover controlling HVAC, lighting, electrical systems, and the surrounding environment. Building Automation will incorporate blue print reading, engineering drawings, apply maintenance techniques and incorporate construction concepts. 3 credit hours

REEC 220: Solar Thermal Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MAIN 101 or ELTC 102
AND
-Completion of REEC 110
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course explores the technologies used in heating with solar energy. The course will cover making, distributing and installing solar thermal systems. Specific systems include flat-plate collection, evacuated tube design, concentrated collection and photovoltaic / solar thermal combined systems. Topics with incorporating hydronic systems to the build will be included. Lab activities will include proper set up and installing solar thermal systems, measure energy usage and controlling solar thermal systems. 3 credit hours

REEC 223: Geothermal and Heat Pump Systems

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of MAIN 104 and MAIN 221
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course explores the technologies used in heating and cooling with geothermal and heat pump equipment. The course will cover installing, troubleshooting and maintaining geothermal equipment and heat pumps. Lab activities will include proper set up, calculating system size, filling thermal transfer fluid, and controlling heat pumps. 3 credit hours

REEC 234: Smart Grid

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of REEC 140 and MAIN 201
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Smart Grid explores the technologies used in maintaining, distributing and controlling electrical energy. The course will cover installing, troubleshooting and maintaining smart grid equipment, on the consumer side and utility side of distribution. Lab activities will include proper set up and control of a consumer based smart grid system. 3 credit hours

REEC 240: Renewable Energy Concepts II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ELTC 103 and REEC 140 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

Renewable Energy Concepts II applies the technologies used in renewable energy systems. The course will cover distributing, installing, troubleshooting, evaluating and designing renewable energy systems. The student will perform intensive lab activities on photovoltaic, wind, solar and geothermal heating, and emerging technologies. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

RELI 150: Understanding Religion

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to the concept and phenomenon of religion, religious study, and the role that religion plays within society and culture. It also introduces the nature, origin, beliefs, major expressions, and practices of religion. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H5 900

IAI Humanities

RELI 215: Major World Religions

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

An introduction to comparative religious study, this course will examine the basic tenets, beliefs, and practices of major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam using historical, psychological, sociological, and phenomenological approaches. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H5 904N

RELI 220: History of Christianity

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

A history of the Christian church from apostolic times to the present, with an emphasis upon doctrinal and institutional development. 3 credit hours

IAI Humanities

RELI 230: Religion in American Society

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is a survey of the various religions found in America and the various roles which religion has played in helping to shape American culture. It examines the contributions of religion to American culture, the development of religious freedom, civil religion, Native American religions, African American religions, and the emergence of new forms of belief and practice, as well as a variety of religious issues confronting American society today. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H5 905

IAI Humanities

RELI 260: Literature of the Bible

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will involve the analysis and discussion of selected texts from the Old and New Testaments, with special attention to the sources and styles of biblical literary techniques. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H5 901

RELI 296: Special Topics in Religious Studies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an advanced course in religious studies that, depending on the particular topic of the course, introduces students to the structures, meanings, intentions, historical frameworks, cultural dynamics, psychological factors, literary expressions, aesthetic presentations and interpretations, and philosophical formulations, as well as the personal, communal, and universal dimensions of religion as found in such aspects as myth, symbol, ritual, ethics, community, sacred writings, religious experience (mysticism), religious thought, and contemplation. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, RELI 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits. 1-3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

SOC 101: Sociology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of society. Topics include the history of the discipline, culture, groups, organizations, bureaucracies, deviance, power and inequality, race/ethnicity, class, gender, education, the economy, the political institution, family, religion, and social change. Students will develop a critical understanding of social forces. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S7 900

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

SOC 102: Social Problems

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course will examine how social problems are framed, who has the power to frame them, how the public reacts to them, how we work to solve these problems, and how we evaluate solutions to problems. Typical issues used within this course to study social problems may include inequality (by social class, race, ethnicity, sex, and age), institutional issues (education, family, health care, crime, etc.), and global threats (war, terrorism, environmental issues). 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S7 901

SOC 110: Sociology of Gender

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will examine various theories of gender role development and persistence in society. Topics will include the impact of the socialization of females and males and their roles in the various social institutions including but not limited to: the labor market, politics, marriage, the family, religion, education and government. The course will also examine how the design of feminism and masculinity in society affects how power is allocated to individuals based on his or her gender. 3 credit hours

IAI Social and Behavioral Sciences

SOC 135: Sociology of Marriage and Family

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is a sociological investigation of marriage and family, with particular attention given to the impact of social institutions on marriage and family structure, various marriage and family arrangements and their consequences, interactions within marriage and family, abuse, divorce and widowhood. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - S7 902

SOC 200: Population and Society

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SOC 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to the study of human population from a sociological perspective. Issues covered will include mortality, fertility, migration, population composition, and the relationship between population and the environment. 3 credit hours

SOC 220: Social Inequalities

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An exploration of differences in the economic, political, and social power of groups and a study of how power differences explain various social inequalities. Class, sex, race/ethnicity, age, occupational, educational, and global inequalities are among the subjects discussed. 3 credit hours

SOC 222: Sociology of Death and Dying

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course focuses on the sociological aspects of death and dying. These include historical changes in attitudes toward and causes of death, cultural diversity in the meanings and rituals surrounding death, coping with dying and grief, age differences in dealing with death, suicide, the death business, and legal issues regarding death. 3 credit hours

SOC 225: Sociology of Work

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course provides an introduction to the sociology of work, including an overview of the history of work and a look at the impact of technology, diversity, inequality, and bureaucracy on the culture of the workplace. The connections between work and personal life will also be explored. 3 credit hours

SOC 226: Sociology of Sport

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SOC 101
AND
-Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

The course will focus upon important, enduring issues within the sociology of sport in addition to controversial issues currently under debate. The course examines sport as a microcosm of society. Through different theoretical perspectives, sport is analyzed as a key social institution that influences and is influenced by the larger society. Particular attention is paid to common sociological concepts such as stratification, discrimination, norms, mobility, violence, and social structure as evidenced in professional and amateur athletics. 3 credit hours

SOC 263: Sociology of Deviant Behavior

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SOC 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Examines the sociological study of the origins, causes, and control of deviance and deviant behavior. Considers deviance through various theoretical perspectives. Emphasis is placed on individual and group deviance, resulting from societal norms and values. Areas to be covered include drug use, sexual deviance, criminal behavior, marginal deviance, and career deviance. 3 credit hours

SOC 296: Special Topics in Sociology

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in sociology. The content and structure of the course will vary according to the topic and instructor. This course may be repeated up to three times with a different topic, for a total of 6 credit hours. The specific topic title will be stated on student’s transcript. 1-4 credit hours

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

SPAN 101 is a beginning course in Spanish, with emphasis on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Course content includes basic vocabulary, essentials of Spanish grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, and the use of actual speech patterns. Students with two or more years of high school Spanish should not enroll in SPAN 101. 4 credit hours

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SPAN 101 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass SPAN 101 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is a second semester beginning course in Spanish continuing to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Course content includes additional basic vocabulary, essentials of Spanish grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation and intonation, and the use of actual speech patterns. 4 credit hours

SPAN 201: Intermediate Spanish I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SPAN 102 OR
-Pass SPAN 102 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Intensive practice in conversation and composition, combined with a review of grammatical and syntactic principles to improve speaking skills, oral composition, and the reading and writing of Spanish. 4 credit hours

IAI Humanities

SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SPAN 201 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass SPAN 201 proficiency exam
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

SPAN 202 is the fourth semester course in the sequence of Spanish courses offered at Heartland Community College. The goal of this class is to help students to effectively communicate in Spanish in both spoken and written situations.
Emphasis will be placed on using activities and assignments that will place value on oral comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Further, the students will be led to better understand and use Spanish in cultural contexts. Students will be required to independently research grammar and vocabulary. 4 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - H1 900

SPAN 204: Spanish Conversation Through Film

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SPAN 102 OR
-Pass SPAN 102 proficiency exam OR
-4 years of high school Spanish
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

SPAN 204 is an intermediate course in Spanish. Through the use of Spanish films, this course will provide activities to help student s further develop their Spanish communication skills. The class is designed to offer a framework for conversing in Spanish in a natural manner. The course will emphasize the building of vocabulary through listening and speaking. Secondarily, the course will involve students with reading and writing in Spanish. Several films from the Spanish speaking world will be shown as springboards for conversation, classroom activities and reading and writing assignments. The films will provide students with the opportunity to listen to native-speakers using authentic Spanish and to read and write opinions of the films. Grammar will be taught as the need arises to clarify both oral and written communication. Through viewing and discussing the films used for this class, the cultural and historical backgrounds of various Spanish speaking countries will also be a topic of conversation. 3 credit hours

SPAN 296: Special Topics in Spanish

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of SPAN 102 with a grade of C or better OR
-Pass SPAN 102 proficiency exam OR
-4 years of high school Spanish
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

SPAN 296 is an intermediate course in Spanish. This course is intended to prepare the students who desire fluency in Spanish. Students will gain confidence if they are willing to try some guided risk-taking. SPAN 296 is structured to offer the framework for conversing in Spanish in a natural manner. The course will stress vocabulary building, listening, speaking, and writing. It will foster authentic language using native-speakers who converse and dialogue in authentic Spanish. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, SPAN 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits toward graduation. 1-3 credit hours

SSI 299: Internship in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides supervised field experiences in a variety of settings that are related to the social and behavioral sciences. Such settings include educational institutions, governmental organizations, businesses, and health care agencies. Students work at least five hours a week (a total of 75 hours a semester equals one internship credit hour), gaining practical skills and experiences in a setting which will utilize social and behavioral science concepts and theories. 1-6 credit hours

SWK 170: Intro to Social Work

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course will explore the social welfare system including social problems and policy responses of society. Topics to be explored include the major social problems, political ideology influencing these problems, program and policy initiatives, philosophies of social welfare programs and professional ethics and standards. 3 credit hours

TECH 110: Blueprint Reading for Construction

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

The course is an introductory course in the basics of construction blueprint reading. All persons involved in the planning, supplying, and/or building of structures should be able to read construction blueprints. Topics include types of drawings, nomenclature, and applications of technical drawings. 2 credit hours

TECH 111: Blueprint Reading for Industry

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

The course is an introductory course in the basics of industrial blueprint reading. The course emphasizes understanding and interpreting single part and assembly prints used in common industrial applications. Topics include types of drawings, nomenclature, and applications of technical drawings. 2 credit hours

TECH 114: Introduction to Technical Graphics

This is an introductory course in the basics of industrial blueprint reading and standard drafting practices; sketching and manual drafting techniques will be covered. Topics include types of drawings, nomenclature, and common applications of technical drawings. 3 credit hours

TECH 121: Principles of Engineering

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. This survey course exposes students to major concepts, including mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. 3 credit hours

TECH 122: Aerospace Engineering

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Students explore the evolution of flight, navigation and control, flight fundamentals, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, and orbital mechanics. In addition, this course presents alternative applications for aerospace engineering concepts. Students analyze, design, and build aerospace systems. They apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final presentation about the future of the industry and their professional goals. 3 credit hours

TECH 123: Biomedical Engineering

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. In this course students explore the diverse fields of biotechnology. Hands-on projects engage students in engineering design problems related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, forensics and bioethics. 3 credit hours

TECH 124: Civil Engineering & Architecture

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. 3 credit hours

TECH 125: Computer Integrated Manufacturing

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. How are things made? What processes go into creating products? Is the process for making a water bottle the same as it is for a musical instrument? How do assembly lines work? How has automation changed the face of manufacturing? While students discover the answers to these questions, they’re learning about the history of manufacturing, robotics and automation, manufacturing processes, computer modeling, manufacturing equipment, and flexible manufacturing systems. 3 credit hours

TECH 126: Digital Electronics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Digital electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as mobile phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras and high-definition televisions. Students are introduced to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, engineering standards and technical documentation. 3 credit hours

TECH 127: Engineering Design & Development

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. 3 credit hours

TECH 296: Special Topics in Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Course will offer students an opportunity to study a topic which is (1) unique and infrequently offered as a part of their program curriculum or (2) of special interest to industry. Each student wishing to enroll in Special Topics in Technology will be reviewed based on (1) previous experience, (2) courses completed, and (3) aptitude/ability match with selected topic. 1-4 credit hours

TECH 297: Independent Study in Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Students will work with faculty to select a technology-related (1) project on which to work or (2) problem to solve. This project or problem should be selected from an area of specialization in their technology-related program. Students gain understanding in this selected area. 1-4 credit hours

TECH 299: Internship in Technology

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of one college level technology-related course with a grade of C or better
AND
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading

Students will work with faculty to select an area of specialization in their technology-related program. Students gain practical work experience in this selected field. Students must complete 75 work hours for each credit hour. Each candidate for the Internship in Technology will be reviewed and selection will be based on (1) previous experience, (2) courses completed, and (3) aptitude/ability match with internship site needs. Students may receive up to 6 internship credits toward graduation. 1-6 credit hours

TESL 101: Theoretical Foundations of TESOL

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An introduction to current and historical approaches to teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) which includes aspects of first and second language acquisition, linguistic principles, and the communicative model. TESL 101 is intended to prepare students to enter the ES/FL discourse community by providing a survey of foundational theories in the field. A research paper is required. Placement in TESL 101 presupposes competence in English grammar, punctuation, and spelling. 3 credit hours

TESL 102: Methods and Materials

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to the foundations of a TESOL classroom which includes a review of ESL language teaching, classroom motivation, curriculum design, and classroom management strategies. A research paper is required. Placement in TESL 102 presupposes competence in English grammar, punctuation, and spelling. 3 credit hours

TESL 103: Assessment and Testing

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course is an introduction to assessment in TESOL with attention to the relationship between learners and the assessment process. Content will include issues of reliability and validity as well as learner-directed assessment. A research paper is required. Placement in TESL 103 presupposes competence in English grammar, punctuation, and spelling. 3 credit hours

TESL 104: Cross-Cultural Aspects of TESOL

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This course provides an introduction to cultural differences as they apply to language learning and the language learning classroom. Content includes politics of TESOL and L2 teacher education, of genres, texts, written and spoken knowledge. A research paper is required. Placement in TESL 104 presupposes competence in English grammar, mechanics, punctuation, and spelling. 3 credit hours

TESL 105: Teaching Practicum

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of TESL 101, TESL 102, TESL 103, AND TESL 104
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This practicum will give students the opportunity to teach or assist in the teaching of ES/FL classrooms. Students will receive professional development in the field of ES/FL education by practicing the skills gained in the previous TESL courses in the certificate program. While gaining experience in the classroom, students will maintain contact with HCC faculty and have access to resources and teaching support through an online course component. 3 credit hours

TESOL 201: TESOL Career Preparation

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 and COMM 101 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level reading

TESOL 201 provides students an overview of the field of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and serves as basic training for teaching English to speakers of other languages in the U.S. or abroad. This course does not yield K-12 certification. Students will study the main components of the field of TESOL including the following: theoretical developments, former and current methodologies, classroom management, and assessment through a series of selected readings. Students will also observe two hours a week of classes in the HCC Adult Education English as a Second Language (ESL) program, assist teachers in designated classes, and lead at least one teaching experience observed by the instructor. After completing this course, students should be able to determine whether teaching ESL is an appropriate career choice and determine whether or not to pursue further educational training. 3 credit hours

IAI Fine Arts

THEA 101: Introduction to Theater

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

THEA 101 is an introductory course which focuses on drama as a performing art. Students will examine representative plays and study the historical, social, cultural, aesthetic, and technical aspects of theatrical expression. 3 credit hours
IAI GEC Code - F1 907

THEA 104: Acting I

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at READ 91 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Fundamentals of acting: concentration, observation, playing action and other basics are introduced through acting exercises, improvisations, and scene study. Major acting proponents from Meisner, Stanislavski, and Shurtleff, will be used as the basis for helping the actor acquire the craft in order to create believable characters. 3 credit hours
IAI Major Code - TA 914

THEA 204: Acting II

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at READ 091 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 090

Designed to offer the student advanced training in the art of acting with regard to play analysis, believable character creation, implementation of acting skills as applied to a variety of texts and styles, and the practice of the three elements of acting (body, voice and mind). This course meets 5 hours for 3 hours credit. 3 credit hours

TMAT 101: Elementary Technical Mathematics

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at MATH 092 OR
-Completion MATH 091 OR
-Completion of a college level math course

This course focuses on the application of basic math principles as commonly found in industry. Topics include a review of basic arithmetic operators, unit conversions, algebraic operations with a focus on formulas, geometry, and basic statistics. An emphasis is placed on application and computation. Some work will require a scientific calculator. 4 credit hours

TMAT 103: Technical Math I

Prerequisite(s):
Completion of MATH 091 OR
-Placement at MATH 092 or higher
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This is a first course in technical mathematics. Topics include scientific notation, number systems, algebra (equations and formulas, factoring, and systems), geometry, and trigonometry. An emphasis is placed on application and computation. Some work will require a scientific calculator. 4 credit hours

TMAT 105: Technical Math II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of TMAT 103 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

Prerequisite: TMAT 103 with a grade of C or better, or assessment. This is a second course in technical mathematics. Topics include trigonometry, vector operations, exponents (including logarithmic form), radicals, systems of linear equations, factoring algebraic expressions, complex numbers, quadratic equations, exponential functions (including logarithmic form), matrices and statistics. An emphasis is placed on application and computation. Some work will require a scientific calculator. 4 credit hours

TPHY 103: Technical Physics I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of TMAT 103 or MATH 94 OR
-Placement at MATH 109 or higher
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

Prerequisite: TMAT 103 or completion of Math through Intermediate Algebra Level 2, or assessment. This is a first course in technical physics. Topics include statics, motion, Newton’s Laws, forces, simple machines, properties of materials, thermodynamics, and electricity. A two-hour laboratory exercise per week will reinforce the lecture material. 4 credit hours

VOL 101: Introduction to Volunteerism

Prerequisite(s):
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed to provide theoretical background to volunteerism and service learning. It will provide an historical overview of volunteerism in the United States. Students will explore service learning opportunities in a variety of service agencies in the community. This class is for members of the Community Scholars Program only. 1 credit hour

VOL 299: Service Learning

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of VOL 101
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099/101
AND
-Placement at college level reading
AND
-Community Scholar in good standing

As part of a service-learning experience, students volunteer at local non-profits for five hours each week, for a total of 70 hours a semester. Students may select volunteer sites/assignments based on their personal or career interests. Volunteer sites/assignments must meet program criteria and be approved prior to volunteering. Students are expected to volunteer as arranged and complete assigned work at the volunteer site and with the course. Students meet weekly in support of the volunteer experience. One absence a semester is permitted. May be repeated three times with different non-profits and/or volunteer assignment. 1 credit hour

WELD 110: Introduction to Welding Processes

This course examines general welding practices and their application to maintenance procedures within an industrial facility. Topics include such welding practices as: cutting, soldering, brazing, SMAW, GMAW, and TIG. Safety instruction is included. 3 credit hours

WELD 116: Shielded Metal Arc Welding I

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of WELD 110 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Completion of English and reading placement tests

This course is the study of the SMAW welding techniques and procedures. Entry-level ability will be developed in meeting industrial requirements. The course involves welding a variety of metals in the flat and horizontal positions using approved electrodes. It is designed to prepare the student for the AWS welder qualification test for unlimited thickness metals. Safety instruction is included. 3 credit hours

WELD 217: Shielded Metal Arc Welding II

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of WELD 116 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course is the study of the SMAW welding techniques and procedures. Advanced levels of ability will be developed in meeting industrial requirements. Course involves welding a variety of metals in all positions using approved electrode and design to prepare the student for the AWS welder qualification test for unlimited thickness metals. Safety instructions related to industry practice and standards will be included. 3 credit hours

WELD 218: Gas Metal Arc Welding

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of WELD 116 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course is the study of the GMAW (also called MIG) welding techniques and procedures. Advanced levels of ability will be developed in meeting industrial requirements. This course involves welding a variety of metals in all positions using approved electrode wire and design to prepare the student for the AWS welder qualification test for unlimited thickness metals. In addition, FCAW processes using shielded and non-shielded electrode wire will be covered. Safety instruction related to industry is included. 3 credit hours

WELD 219: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of WELD 217 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at ENGL 099 or higher OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 094
AND
-Placement at college level reading OR
-Concurrent enrollment in READ 091

This course is the study of the GTAW welding techniques, and procedures. Advanced levels of ability will be developed in meeting industrial requirements. The course includes welding of a variety of metals using the GTAW process. It is designed to prepare the student for the AWS welder qualification test for ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Safety instruction is included. 3 credit hours

WELD 220: Welding Fabrication for Industry

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of WELD 218 OR
-Permission of division dean
AND
-Placement at college level English OR
-Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 99/101
AND
-Placement at college reading

This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to demonstrate their technical welding skills in preparation for industry. Topics include safety, set-up techniques, quality production, economics of design, fixturing, hold-downs & clamping and support materials. Manufacturers require these skills in order to improve production, and safety in the workplace. 3 credit hours

WST 201: Introduction to Women’s Studies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

An intensive and critical examination of the nature and function of women in society from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course may concentrate on specific disciplinary approaches to issues critical to women. Areas such as historical examination of the construction of women in society, feminist political philosophy, women in the arts, literature, science, law, medicine and the family may be covered. 3 credit hours

WST 296: Special Topics in Women’s Studies

Prerequisite(s):
-Completion of ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better
AND
-Placement at college level reading

This is an advanced course which explores a theme or problem area in the field of women’s studies. The course will examine themes and topics of contemporary and historical interest in the study of women and their contributions across the disciplines and in the culture at large. Possible topic areas include Issues in Women’s Health; Women and Religion; Gender and Science; Women and Work; Cultural Expression of Gender; Women in the Third World; History of Women in America; Women and the Media; History of the Women’s Movement; Gender and Civil Rights Legislation; Gender and Language; Women in the Arts. Readings will center on current research in the study of gender and may represent a variety of methodologies and disciplines. Because topics and research studied will change each semester, WST 296 may be repeated for a total of six credits. 1-3 credit hours