Course Selection Guide

Use this guide to see courses we believe are appropriate options for high school students.

Success Education

This pathway offers workshops/courses that will improve study skills, assist in career exploration and enhance life skills like budgeting and time management.

  • There are no formal prerequisites or placement testing requirements for workshops/courses in this pathway.
  • You may choose to offer a selection of workshops separately or as complete GENS 100-level courses.

Workshops

  • Students can earn one credit hour for every eight workshops they complete. (Maximum # of credit hours allowed: 3) 
  • Qualified instructors must have a Bachelor's degree, although a Master's degree preferred.

Courses

  • Students can earn one credit hour each for GENS 100, GENS 101 and GENS 102 OR three credit hours for GENS 105.
  • Qualified instructors must have a Master’s degree and attend On Course Workshop I.
College Success

GENS 100: College Success

A foundational course in active learning strategies and effective study skills that focus on the learner’s role and responsibility in the learning process. 
  • The following workshops make up this course.
  • Credit hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 20-30

 

Becoming an Active Student - Learners will identify the characteristics and benefits of being an active student. The differences between passive and active listening will be discussed as related to academic success. The focus will be on empowering students to take responsibility for their own learning. 

Mastering Time Management - Learners will recognize their responsibility for managing their own time. They will identify strategies to combat procrastination and/or distractions that “steal” their time. They will learn to use effective self-management tools to keep them on track to achieving their goals.

Exploring Your Learning Preferences - Learners will discover their preferred method(s) of learning, while gaining insight into all of the different learning preferences and strengths/ challenges for each. Using their knowledge of learning preferences, they will identify personally useful strategies to become more effective learners.

Perspectives on Learning - Learners will define personalization as it pertains to learning. They will also identify and discuss tools needed to support student-centered learning, and related data, curriculum, assessment and technology.

Becoming an Active Reader - Learners will recognize the difference between passive and active reading. They will learn strategies to become actively engaged in their reading in order to comprehend and retain the information they have read. They will evaluate active reading strategies to determine which will work best with their existing study strategies and learning preferences.

Enhancing Your Study Strategies - Learners will understand how to organize materials and choose an appropriate study environment in order to make the most of their study time. They will identify study techniques they can use for various kinds of assignments and will become familiar with using a study plan to set goals for their study sessions.

Improving Test Performance - Learners will understand that adequate preparation and distributed practice is essential for improving test performance. Memory strategies to increase retention of information will be discussed. They will identify strategies to utilize before, during and after their exams to improve their grades and reduce test anxiety.

Developing Critical Thinking Skills - Learners will identify and analyze what criteria and sources they use to make decisions. They will have the opportunity to reflect on the process of making informed choices related to education, the workforce, being a consumer and other life roles.

Gaining Information Literacy - Learners will explore valuable criteria for evaluating the information they find online and will practice questioning and comparing websites to determine the best source. Website domain names will be discussed and they will be asked to consider implications for the credibility of the information contained in each site.

Developing Research Skills - Learners will review the steps in an effective research process and learn techniques to generate effective search terms. They will understand the concept of plagiarism and importance of properly citing their sources.

Learning for a Lifetime - Learners will understand that learning happens every day in different life roles. They will consider how they typically approach unfamiliar situations or challenges and whether their current approach is productive. They will be encouraged to see the value (and dare we say fun?) in learning and facing new challenges.

Career Success

GENS 101: Career Success

Explore significant personal factors such as values, interests, skills and personality preferences in order to make informed career and lifestyle choices. Students will research potential careers and use labor market information, decision-making strategies and goal-setting to develop an individual career action plan. [The workshops below make up this course.]

  • The following workshops make up this course.
  • Credit hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 20-30

 

Planning Career Pathways - Learners will understand that career development is an ongoing process; at times they may need to reevaluate their level of career satisfaction and go through some of the decision-making steps again. They will become familiar with the Career Clusters™ framework and how they can use it in their career development process. Each participant will identify their top three career clusters™ to use as a starting point for further exploration.

Exploring Career Interests and Skills - Learners will identify their areas of strongest interest using the Holland Codes. They will also explore their strengths/skills by evaluating their experiences or accomplishments. They will understand the importance of learning about themselves and using that information to make informed career decisions.

Exploring Personality and Values - Learners will define and clarify their values while understanding the role of values in career decision-making. They will self-assess their personality type and discover how it relates to career planning and satisfaction.

Deciding on a College Major - Learners will consider the role of their interests and skills when choosing a major. They will identify the information needed in order to make educated decisions about their future career and college major. Time will be spent exploring career research sites to learn more about potential careers of interest.

Navigating the College Selection Process - Learners will understand the steps and important timelines in the college application process. They will recognize the variety of factors to consider when selecting a college and reflect upon what elements are most important to them. Resources for gaining necessary information about colleges of interest will be discussed.

Writing a College Admissions Essay - Learners will understand the purpose and importance of the application essay. They will identify experiences and character traits that may provide appropriate essay topics and begin the essay outline process.

Applying for Financial Aid and Scholarships – Learners will understand the estimated family contribution (EFC) and the role it plays in determining financial need. They will explore the cost of attendance (COA) and compare the COA of colleges they are considering. Participants will put together their own financial aid package including federal aid, scholarships, and loans and identify sources for scholarship  searches.

Transitioning to College - Learners will begin to understand the differences between high school and college in order to better prepare for these new experiences. They will consider their feelings about their upcoming high school to college transition and identify strategies they can use to settle into their new “home” for the next 2-4 years.

Developing Your Leadership Skills - Learners will consider their own beliefs, assumptions and questions about the concept of leadership. They will begin developing their own definition of leadership based on their values and experiences.

Understanding the Job Search Process - Learners will recognize that being prepared to job search is an important step in the process. They will be able to identify different job search methods and will explore the importance of networking.

Writing a Resumé - Learners will recognize the purpose and importance of a resumé. They will focus on the information that is expected and appropriate for this document and begin designing their own personal resumé to build upon in the coming years.

Developing Interview Skills - Learners will recognize that being prepared for the job interview is just as important as the interview itself. They will practice anticipating interviewer questions and writing their own questions to ask in an interview. Behavioral interviewing techniques and best practices will be discussed.

Personal Success

GENS 102: Personal Success

This course provides an introduction to academic and personal skills essential for success in college and in life. Topics include personal responsibility, goal setting, critical thinking and emotional intelligence. Students learn to create success by applying proven principles for active learning, self-motivation, self- management and interdependence. 

  • The following workshops make up this course.
  • Credit hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 20-30

 

Targeting Success - Learners will understand the purpose of the GPS workshop series and how it can be of value to them. They will begin thinking about their own personal definition of success and what “being successful” would look like in their life. They will also begin to assess their strengths and areas of challenge in relation to the On Course principles (Choices of Successful Learners).

Motivating Self - Learners will begin designing a Life Plan and defining their long-term goals/life purpose. They will understand the differences between external and internal motivation. They will also begin to understand what factors are personally motivating to them.

Mastering Self-Management - Learners will understand the concept of personal responsibility and how their choices create the outcomes and experiences of their lives. They will understand the differences between creator and victim language and can apply this to situations in their own lives. They will also understand the importance of taking purposeful actions on a daily basis in order to achieve their short and long-term goals.

Developing Effective Communication - Learners will gain understanding into the different communication styles and the strengths and challenges of each. They will identify their personal communication style and consider the impact communication will have across all of their life roles.

Valuing Interdependence - Learners will understand and begin working toward interdependence in all areas of their lives, reinforcing mutual cooperation. They will identify valuable academic and personal resources and begin building a support network that can assist them in reaching their goals. They will also gain understanding of how interdependence will play a role in their lives as college students and members of the workforce.

Gaining Self-Awareness - Learners will identify self-defeating habit patterns that may be impacting their outcomes and experiences and discuss strategies for changing these habits. They will also focus on the components of emotional intelligence and recognize that everyone is responsible for the quality of their lives. They will recognize that “EQ” will have an impact on success in college, the workforce and relationships.

Managing Stress - Learners will discuss possible symptoms of stress and identify their own personal “stress signals.” They will begin identifying sources of stress in their lives now, as well as additional stressors they may face in college. They will be able to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy options for dealing with stress and identify resources for support.

Understanding Civic Responsibility - Learners will identify some of the issues and problems evident in their world and will determine what it means to be a responsible citizen. They will articulate an understanding of why people hesitate to become involved in problem resolution and will consider the ways they can get involved to make a difference in their community.

Exploring Healthy Lifestyles - Learners will understand that health is not one dimensional; there are six different elements of health that each play an important role in overall wellness and life satisfaction. They will begin to assess the level of balance and satisfaction with their current state of wellness.

Planning Personal Finances - Learners will begin defining their current and future financial goals. They will practice evaluating budgets in relation to financial goals and setting up a budget for independent living.

Preparing for Independent Living - Learners will begin to understand the costs and responsibilities of living independently. They will consider ways to cut costs on one-time and ongoing expenses. They will have the opportunity to reflect on what factors to prioritize when looking for their first apartment.

Becoming Active on Campus - Learners will begin to articulate the outcomes and experiences (outside of academics) they hope to achieve during their time in college. They will explore opportunities for involvement in college that will enhance their overall experience and personal growth.

Life Success

GENS 105: Life Success

This course will help students gain awareness of their academic career and personal selves and facilitate development in each of these areas. Focus will be placed on gaining knowledge of each self, identifying areas of strength and those needing improvement and mastering the tools necessary to achieve growth in these life areas. Students cannot receive credit for both GENS 105 and GENS 100, GENS 101, or GENS 102. 

  • Credit hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20-30

General Education

This pathway offers first-year college courses that meet general education core curriculum requirements in the following categories outlined by the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI).

  • These courses require proof of college-level literacy through completion of placement testing at Heartland or submission of eligible scores achieved through alternate placement tests, such as ACT or SAT.
  • Some courses may also require completion of or concurrent enrollment in other courses.
  • Qualified instructors must have a master’s degree with a minimum of 18 graduate hours in the course discipline

*See each course listing for details.

Communication/English

COMM 101: Introduction to Oral Communication

This is an introductory course in public speaking, with the dual goals of helping students understand basic communication principles and improving their oral communication skills. The course emphasizes preparing, selecting, organizing and delivering oral messages, as well as analyzing and evaluating the speaking-listening process.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 22
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in COMM

ENGL 101: Critical Reading & Writing+

In this course, students will improve their writing by learning about the integrated relationship between critical reading and writing skills. Students will explore how genres of communication shape the acts of reading and writing, and in the process, will learn how to become responsible and ethical readers, writers and designers of various kinds of texts. Students gain exposure to a wide range of tools and skills available and necessary to 21st century readers and writers, including collaboration techniques, visual design principles and how to effectively control surface features of their writing.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 22-25
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ENGL

ENGL 102: Multimodal Composition+

Students will put rhetorical principles into useful cultural practice via researching, designing, creating and sharing multimodal composition projects that contribute to real academic or career purposes and audiences. Conceptual knowledge of genre, textual control, document design, writer responsibility and collaboration will be applied as students research academic or career interests. Students will learn and apply both primary and secondary research skills, and will compose projects that successfully employ genre-appropriate reasoning, formats and structures.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 22-25
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 w/ a “C” or better
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ENGL

+ = Course capacity can increase within the range provided only if class meets for 250 minutes or more per week.

Fine Arts & Humanities

ART 150: Understanding Art

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the role of art in our culture and in contemporary life. This course introduces art works from all cultures and periods to establish basic language of art and the principles of aesthetic organization. Information regarding the artist’s tools, materials, exhibition spaces and the art market will be studied to further illustrate the use of art in our world. Not intended for art majors. *Mature Content*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ART

HUMA 101: Introduction to the Humanities

Introduction to the Humanities is the study of social and cultural values as expressed through the major art forms, including painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, music, dance, film and photography. The course will examine the elements and formal qualities that are characteristic of each art form, the relationships between the arts and the social and historical contexts from which they developed.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HUMA OR a broad base of HUMA credits (Architecture, Art, Art History, Dance, Film, Literature, Music, Theater)

FILM 101: Introduction to Film Studies

This class examines film as an art form, as a social practice and as a business. While focus will be on film as a narrative medium with its various genres and themes, this course will also explore documentary and experimental film from around the world, all as expressed through sound, editing, lighting, set design and other aspects of visual composition and cinematography.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in FILM

LITR 111: Introduction to Literature+

This course is a survey of the major literary genres (poetry, short stories, plays and novels) and involves the reading and discussion of representative works with the aim of providing competence in critical reading and analysis, as well as the knowledge of formal literary characteristics. As part of this analysis, students will situate each work within its historical, social and cultural context in order to gain a deeper understanding of its place within our world and the place from which they developed.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 24-25
  • Prerequisite: Completion of OR concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ENGL

MUSI 150: Music Appreciation

An introduction to music appreciation and theory for students who do not intend to major in music. This course is designed to provide familiarity with the elements of music and with various musical forms and stylistic periods so the students can actively and perceptively listen to a wide variety of music. The ability to read music is not required for enrollment.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in MUSI

RELI 215: Major World Religions

An introduction to comparative religious study, this course will examine the basic tenets, beliefs and practices of major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam using historical, psychological, sociological and phenomenological approaches.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in RELI

THEA 101: Introduction to Theater

This is an introductory course which focuses on drama as a performing art. Students will examine representative plays and study the historical, social, cultural, aesthetic and technical aspects of theatrical expression.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in THEA
Life & Physical Sciences

AGRI 120: Introduction to Horticulture

This course provides a general introduction to the principles of plant growth and development as they apply to the wide range of horticultural crops and the industries related to production, marketing and utilization of horticultural  crops.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in AGRI

BIOL 114: Contemporary Biology

This course will introduce students to a broad range of biological principles, including organization, structure and function, heredity, evolution and ecology. Students will demonstrate how their knowledge in biology is relevant to them, their community and their world. Students will use scientific evidence as the basis for their arguments. Students will improve their skills in relaying biological information to peers and to others. In addition, students will leave with a better understanding of scientific views that differ from their own. The laboratory component will emphasize scientific inquiry and use of knowledge in problem solving. This course is intended for students who are not pursuing a science career.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Life Science
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 092
    • OR placement at MATH 093 or higher
    • OR completion of a college-level math course
    • AND placement at college-level English
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in BIOL

EASC 101: Introduction to Geology

This is a study of the origin and types of earth materials and the processes at work in our physical environment. Topics include earthquakes, erosion, mountain building, minerals, rocks, volcanoes and glaciers. A two-hour lab each week will emphasize lecture material. Field trip required.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EASC

EASC 111: Environment Earth

This is a course for non-science majors who desire a physical science understanding of environmental concerns. Topics may include: ground water, air quality, land management, nuclear energy and solid waste disposal. An optional lab (EASC 122) will apply physical science principles to lecture material.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 32
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EASC

EASC 122: Introduction to Earth Science Lab+

This is a beginning college-level laboratory science course that will present basic applications with problem-solving challenges and discovery methods in the physical sciences.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science Lab
  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 20-25
  • Prerequisite: Completion of OR concurrent enrollment in EASC 111
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree  w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EASC
+ = Course capacity can increase within the range provided only if class meets for 250 minutes or more per week.
Social & Behavioral Sciences

ANTH 102: Introduction to General Anthropology

This course provides an introductory survey of Anthropology and its subfields (cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology and linguistics). Students will study the nature of humans and their development in relationship to their physical and social environment today and in the past.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ANTH

GEOG 101: World Geography

This course is a study of the interrelationships between contemporary world cultures and geographic structures and regions. The course includes a geographic perspective of human origins and distribution, population, migration, health, climate, culture, language, settlements, industry and agriculture.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in GEOG

HIST 101: Western Civilization to 1500

This course covers the main stream of Western civilization from the first millennium B.C. to 1500. The course considers religious, economic and cultural trends and developments as well as the major political events of the period. The focus of the course is on Europe but the great Middle Eastern civilizations and cultural contributions are considered as they impact Europe and help shape the West. Special attention is given to individuals and their contributions as well as to the rise of nations.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

HIST 102: Western Civilization Since 1500

This course covers the development of the modern West in terms of the great movements of the past five centuries: The Reformation, The Enlightenment, Absolutism and the rise of the nation state, the French Revolution, Industrialization, the emergence of modern political ideology, the World Wars, the Cold War and the roots of the present political situation. The course emphasizes watershed events in the realm of religion, politics, economics, artistic and cultural developments and war. Special attention is given to the contributions of individuals in shaping the modern world.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

HIST 135: History of the US to 1865

This course covers the major political, social, economic and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States from the early explorations of America to the Civil War and Reconstruction.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

HIST 136: History of the US Since 1865

This course covers the major political, social, economic and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

POS 101: American Government and Politics

This course introduces students to the structures and processes of American government and politics, to the exercise of power, and to value conflicts among key actors in the political process. The course also addresses some of the theoretical underpinnings of the study of American government such as democracy, pluralism and elitism. Finally, the course asks students to apply their learning to interpretations of current political events. Topics for study in the course include: political participation, interest groups, the Constitution, civil liberties, civil rights, the presidency, Congress, the federal court system, the media, political parties and elections.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in POS

PSY 101: Introduction to Psychology

This course provides an introduction to psychology as the scientific study of human and animal behavior with an emphasis on the factors that influence human behavior and mental processes. This course also focuses on how we may use knowledge and theories of physical and emotional/cognitive growth, learning, personality functioning and coping, and social interactions in our everyday lives.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in PSY

SOC 101: Sociology

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of society. Topics include the history of the discipline, culture, groups, organizations, bureaucracies, deviance, power and inequality, race/ethnicity, class, gender, education, the economy, the political institution, family, religion and social change. Students will develop a critical understanding of social forces.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in SOC

Career & Technical Education

This pathway offers career and technical education courses connected to applied degree or certificate programs at Heartland.

  • There are no formal placement testing requirements for career and technical education courses listed.
  • Qualified instructors must have 2,000 work hours experience unless otherwise noted.

Transferable Elective Options

This section also displays transferable elective courses, which often differ from career and technical course with regard to course prerequisites and/or instructor qualifications. Placement testing requirements are noted by applicable electives.

*See each course listing for details.

Business Technology/Administrative Office Professional

ACSM 101: Introduction to Computers

Introduction to Computers will introduce students from any major to the essential computing concepts including computer hardware and software, in addition to the Internet and World Wide Web. Students will work with a current operating system in addition to software packages used in business and industry. Ethical and social issues will be emphasized. Keyboarding ability recommended. Credit will not be awarded for students who have taken ACSM 102 and ACSM 103 combined. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in CSCI

ACSM 125: Powerpoint

This course is a comprehensive exploration of designing and creating presentations. Students will learn the key concepts and techniques of Microsoft PowerPoint to create professional presentations. Keyboarding skills are recommended.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35

ACSM 136: Excel Level I

This course will introduce students to the use of spreadsheets through Microsoft Excel. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating, editing, formatting and enhancing worksheets and charts, and adding visual interest to workbooks. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken ACSM 135.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35

ACSM 137: Excel Level II

This course will build on the skills developed in ACSM 136 with emphasis on creating and using advanced functions and formulas, and working with tables and data features. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and modifying charts, using conditional formatting rules and custom number formats, filtering and sorting data, creating PivotTables and customizing Sparklines.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ACSM 136

ACSM 138: Excel Level III

This final course in the Excel series will focus on using data analysis features to make good business decisions. Students will receive hands-on instruction in using auditing tools, creating assumptions and performing What-If analysis, protecting and sharing workbooks, automating tasks using macros, creating custom templates, and importing, exporting and distributing data.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ACSM 137

ACSM 146: Access Level I

This course will introduce students to the major components  of database management systems using Microsoft Access. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and managing tables, queries, forms, and reports and will develop an understanding of the relationships between these functions.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35

ACSM 147: Access Level II

This course will build on the skills developed in ACSM 146, with emphasis on data storage and retrieval measures. Students will receive hands-on instruction in using data filters, forms and advanced query techniques, as well as creating relationships between tables and lookup fields.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ACSM 146

ACSM 148: Access Level III

This final course in the Access series will focus on advanced form techniques and managing a database. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and modifying custom forms, reports and macros, importing data and linking to tables in another database.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ACSM 147

ACSM 156: Word Level I

This course will introduce students to the basics of word processing software using Microsoft Word. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating, formatting, and editing Word documents, and working with envelopes and labels.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35

ACSM 157: Word Level II

This course will build on the skills developed in ACSM 156, with emphasis on enhancing Word documents. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating tables and charts, inserting images, tracing changes and comments, merging documents and managing a data source.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ACSM 156

ACSM 158: Word Level III

This final course in the Microsoft® Word series will focus on using advanced techniques to manage documents. Students will receive hands-on instruction in creating and customizing themes and styles, inserting references, creating indexes, forms and outlines, and working with macros.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ACSM 157

BUSN 110: Introduction to Business

This course focuses on clarifying the complexities of the business world while enhancing students’ skills in critical thinking, problem solving, diversity, multiculturalism and communication; thus providing them with necessary tools for business success. Within a framework of professionalism, ethical decision making, responsibility and the use of technology, students will assess the global, economic, social, technological and political environments impacting business. In addition, students will examine the essential elements of organizational structure, marketing, management, accounting and financial decision making. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Prerequisite: Placement at college-level English
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in BUSN

OTEC 101: Keyboarding

This is an introductory course in business technology designed to develop basic data input skills. The course provides instruction in keyboard and machine control techniques. Emphasis is placed on correct skill building. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken OTEC 103.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 40

OTEC 102: Advanced Keyboarding

This is an introductory course in office technology designed to develop basic word processing skills. Emphasis is placed on efficient use of the most popular word processing software package. Credit will not be awarded for students who have previously taken OTEC 103.

  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 35
  • Prerequisite: Completion of OTEC 101
Computer Science/Networking

CSCI 101: Introduction to Computer Information Science

This course presents concepts of computer based systems; computer hardware, software and organization environments; system categories, delivery modes; systems development methods; career opportunities and responsibilities. This is a lecture course with hands-on experience with microcomputers. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hour: 4
  • Course Capacity: 24
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum 18 graduate hours in CSCI
    • And CISCO instructor certification

NETW 121: Introduction to Networks

This is the first of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media and operations will be introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. Instruction includes, but is not limited to: networking, LANs, WANs, OSI models, routers, router programming, topologies and IP addressing.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of CSCI 101

NETW 122: Routing & Switching Essentials

This is the second of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction includes, but is not limited to: network terminology and protocols specifications, LANs, WANs, Ethernet, TCP/IP Addressing Protocol, dynamic routing and the network administrator’s role and function. Particular emphasis is given to the use of problem-solving to resolve networking issues.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of NETW 121 

NETW 150: Workstation Operating Systems

This course presents the features of a workstation operating system and takes a detailed look at command line based and graphical user interface based microcomputer operating systems. The class will be taught using Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP and DOS in a Windows format. The class includes discussion concerning Network Operating Systems and functional criteria for operating system design, job management, task management, data management, resource allocation and dump and trace facilities.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of CSCI 101

NETW 151: PC Hardware Maintenance & Repair

This course covers the common microcomputer hardware maintenance functions. This course is not intended to train experienced technicians but rather to assist the common microcomputer user concerning basic maintenance functions and to determine when to call an expert technician for help. This course also covers basic installation procedures for commercial microcomputer software.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of CSCI 101

NETW 160: Introduction to Networking

This course is an introduction to hardware and software used in data communication and networking. Topics include personal computer hardware, operating systems, connecting to a network and the Internet, network addressing, network services, wireless technology, basic security and troubleshooting. This course provides a knowledge base of networking concepts and terminology in preparation for more advanced study of networks with a basic understanding of digital data and communications. Practical experience with networks is part of the course.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of CSCI 101

NETW 166: Windows Workstation Administration

This course prepares students to setup and support the Microsoft Windows workstation operating system. It also helps prepare students for the related Microsoft certification exam.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of NETW 150 w/ a “C” or better

NETW 167: Windows Server Administration

This course prepares students to install and configure a Microsoft Windows Server. Various file systems and disk management functions, administering the operating system, network protocols and remote access are included. It also helps prepare students for the Microsoft Certified Professional examination.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Prerequisite: Completion of NETW 150 w/ a “C” or better
Criminal Justice Studies

CRJ 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is a survey and analysis of the criminal justice system, including a historical and philosophical overview of the development, with special emphasis on the system’s primary components. The components examined include the police, the courts and the corrections system, in the administration of criminal justice in the United States. This course is designed to make the student a more informed citizen of criminal justice statistics, services and response to crime and its impact on society. It is also designed to provide a broad base necessary for more advanced studies for those majoring in criminal justice. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Prerequisite: Placement at college-level English
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in CRJ
Digital Media Communication

DMED 101: Introduction to Digital Media

An introduction to the major media forms used in digital media production, including print design, web design, audio production, video production, animation and authoring tools. Students will also investigate the impact of digital media on society and current issues in media and technology. Basic computer skills will be expected in the areas of word processing, graphic and paint programs.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 18

DMED 110: Web Page Development

An introduction to the World Wide Web on the Internet and its uses as a communication tool. The course will cover essential terms and technologies, creating web pages, critiquing Internet content and a review of ethical and legal issues. Basic computer skills will be expected. Course covers HTML5 and CSS coding as well using web design programs to create content. Special attention is paid to creating web content that adheres to web standards. Students learn basics of image manipulation. The course will have a continuing emphasis on successfully communicating through the web, especially considering design and interactivity.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 18

DMED 120: Computer Imaging and Design

An introduction to creating and manipulating digital images. Emphasis is placed on studying and applying basic design concepts, while dealing with common print, video and computer designing challenges faced in the business world. Computer graphic programs, including Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign or Quark will be used.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 18
Early Childhood Education

CHLD 101: Introduction to Early Childhood

This course provides an overview of the historical and present-day representations of the fields of early childhood general education, early childhood special education, and early intervention. Information regarding organizational structures and public policy are shared via lecture and comparative observations. The course includes a strong focus on professional ethics, knowledge, skills, and dispositions. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 32
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EDU

CHLD 102: Growth and Development of the Young Child

This course provides an overview of the theory and principles of human growth and development from conception through adolescence. Content includes an in-depth study of the inter-relatedness of physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects of development. Development is studied in the context of family, gender, culture, language, ability, socioeconomics, diversity, and society. Special emphasis will be on the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Gardner. Four field observations are required outside of class time in addition to at least two during class sessions. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 32
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master's degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ECE or related field

CHLD 202: Health, Safety & Nutrition for the Young Child

This course provides an overview of the health, safety and nutritional needs of young children and early childhood practices to ensure the health and well-being of each child in a group setting. Content includes roles and responsibilities of adults in meeting children's diverse needs, the promotion of healthy life style practices, understanding common childhood illnesses and injuries, meeting health, nutrition and safety standards, and planning nutritious meals that are appropriate for each child. *Transfer Elective*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 32
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master's degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ECE or related field
Health & Human Services

EMT 101: Emergency Medical Technician

An introduction to the principles and practices of pre-hospital emergency care based upon the current U.S. Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety national standard curriculum for providers of primary medical care at scenes of an accident and/or illness. This course contains a variety of skills, which require fine-motor coordination. Students must also be physically able to lift and transfer patients safely and correctly. EMT 101 meets federal and state guidelines for EMT training, and students who successfully complete this course will be able to take the Illinois State or National Registry EMT licensure exam.

  • Credit Hours: 8
  • Course Capacity: 25
  • Instructor Qualifications: A current license as an EMT-B, EMT-I, EMT-P, RN or physician;
    • a minimum of four years of experience in pre-hospital emergency care;
    • at least two years of documented teaching experience;
    • documented classroom teaching experience, i.e., BTLS, PHTLS, CPR, Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS);
    • documented successful completion of the Illinois
    • EMS Instructor Education Course or equivalent to the National Standard Curriculum for EMS Instructors.

HLTH 110: Medical Terminology

Through the study of medical prefixes, roots and suffixes, students will learn how to define and use medical terms as they relate to body structure and function, medical procedures and disease processes. This class will also emphasize spelling, pronunciation and abbreviations.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

NURS 110: Nursing Assistant

The course prepares individuals to function as nursing assistants in nursing homes, hospitals and private homes.  Basic nursing knowledge and skills required to care for individuals in a manner that respects their dignity will be the focus of this course. The course contains a variety of skills which require fine-motor coordination. Students must also be physically able to lift and transfer patients safely and correctly. Students must submit to authorization for a Live Scan fingerprint (required by Illinois law), a physical exam, TB testing and a uniform purchase. NURS 110 meets federal and state guidelines for nursing assistant training and students who successfully complete this course will be eligible to take the competency evaluation required for nursing assistants.

  • Credit Hours: 8
  • Course Capacity: 8
  • Instructor Qualifications: 2,000 work hours experience
    • AND an active IL RN license
    • AND current Train the Trainer (IDPH) certificate
Industrial Technology

CAD 101: Introduction to AutoCAD

This course provides an overview of AutoCAD software use. You will learn basic AutoCAD commands and techniques for mechanical, architectural, and other applications.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 25

CAD 235: CAD for Construction

This course introduces the principles and practices used in the construction industry to create working drawings for residential and commercial construction projects. You will learn how to use the most current software tools to create plans to the latest building codes and standards; development of sketching and problem-solving techniques will be emphasized.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 16
  • Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OR completion of CAD101

CNST 101: Construction Materials and Methods

This course introduces light commercial and residential construction techniques and materials. Students will learn basic construction principles and the materials used in the industry; emphasis will be placed on the requirements of buildings to be energy efficient.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 16

MFTG 115: Manufacturing & Production Processes

This course examines safety, quality, and manufacturing processes; each of the three areas is broken down with definitions, examples, and exercises. You will learn about manufacturing concepts and actions that can produce higher quality products, increase productivity, achieve greater customer satisfaction, and assure a safe and healthy work environment; practical cases and real-world examples are investigated and discussed.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 25

TECH 114: Introduction to Technical Graphics

This course covers the basics of industrial blueprint reading and standard drafting practices including both sketching and manual drafting techniques. Learn about types of drawings, nomenclature, and common applications of technical drawings.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 20

WELD 110: Introduction to Welding Processes

This course examines general welding practices and their application within an industrial facility. You will learn welding practices such as: cutting, soldering, brazing, SMAW, GMAW, and TIG.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 10 HCC-Normal | up to 20 high school setting
    • Capacity is contingent upon on equipment availability.

WELD 116: Shielded Metal Arc Welding I

This course covers SMAW welding techniques, procedures, and safety. You will begin to prepare for the American Welding Society (AWS) welder qualification test for unlimited thickness metals by gaining entry-level welding ability in meeting industrial requirements and learning welding a variety of metals in the flat and horizontal positions using approved electrodes.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 10 HCC-Normal | up to 20 high school setting
    • Capacity is contingent upon on equipment availability.
  • Prerequisite: Completion of WELD 110

Project Lead the Way Courses

TECH 121: Principles of Engineering

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. This survey course exposes students to major concepts, including mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30 

TECH 122: Aerospace Engineering

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Students explore the evolution of flight, navigation and control, flight fundamentals, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, and orbital mechanics. In addition, this course presents alternative applications for aerospace engineering concepts. Students analyze, design, and build aerospace systems. They apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final presentation about the future of the industry and their professional goals.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

TECH 123: Biomedical Engineering

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. In this course students explore the diverse fields of biotechnology. Hands-on projects engage students in engineering design problems related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, forensics and bioethics.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

TECH 124: Civil Engineering & Architecture

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

TECH 125: Computer Integrated Manufacturing

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. How are things made? What processes go into creating products? Is the process for making a water bottle the same as it is for a musical instrument? How do assembly lines work? How has automation changed the face of manufacturing? While students discover the answers to these questions, they're learning about the history of manufacturing, robotics and automation, manufacturing processes, computer modeling, manufacturing equipment, and flexible manufacturing systems.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

TECH 126: Digital Electronics

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Digital electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as mobile phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras and high-definition televisions. Students are introduced to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, engineering standards and technical documentation.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

TECH 127: Engineering Design & Development

This course will offer students a unique opportunity to earn dual credit for high school level Project Lead the Way (PLTW) coursework; students must be enrolled in approved high school level PLTW programs in order to qualify for this course. Students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities.

  • Credit Hour: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30

Contact Person

For your administrative partnership process OR course selection inquiries:

Email Sarah Diel-Hunt, Ph.D.

Associate VP for Academic Affairs
Phone: 309-268-8593