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General Education

This pathway offers first-year college courses that meet general education core curriculum requirements in the following categories outlined by the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI).

  • These courses require proof of college-level literacy through completion of placement testing at Heartland or submission of eligible scores achieved through alternate placement tests, such as ACT or SAT.
    • Some courses may also require a Math placement score.
    • Some courses may also require completion of or concurrent enrollment in other courses.
  • Qualified instructors must have a master’s degree with a minimum of 18 graduate hours in the course discipline

*See each course listing for details.

Communication/English

COMM 101: Introduction to Oral Communication

This is an introductory course in public speaking, with the dual goals of helping students understand basic communication principles and improving their oral communication skills. The course emphasizes preparing, selecting, organizing and delivering oral messages, as well as analyzing and evaluating the speaking-listening process.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 22
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in COMM

ENGL 101: Critical Reading & Writing+

In this course, students will improve their writing by learning about the integrated relationship between critical reading and writing skills. Students will explore how genres of communication shape the acts of reading and writing, and in the process, will learn how to become responsible and ethical readers, writers and designers of various kinds of texts. Students gain exposure to a wide range of tools and skills available and necessary to 21st century readers and writers, including collaboration techniques, visual design principles and how to effectively control surface features of their writing.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 22-25
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ENGL

ENGL 102: Multimodal Composition+

Students will put rhetorical principles into useful cultural practice via researching, designing, creating and sharing multimodal composition projects that contribute to real academic or career purposes and audiences. Conceptual knowledge of genre, textual control, document design, writer responsibility and collaboration will be applied as students research academic or career interests. Students will learn and apply both primary and secondary research skills, and will compose projects that successfully employ genre-appropriate reasoning, formats and structures.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 22-25
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 w/ a “C” or better
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ENGL

+ = Course capacity can increase within the range provided only if class meets for 250 minutes or more per week.

Fine Arts & Humanities

ART 150: Understanding Art

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the role of art in our culture and in contemporary life. This course introduces art works from all cultures and periods to establish basic language of art and the principles of aesthetic organization. Information regarding the artist’s tools, materials, exhibition spaces and the art market will be studied to further illustrate the use of art in our world. Not intended for art majors. *Mature Content*

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ART

HUMA 101: Introduction to the Humanities

Introduction to the Humanities is the study of social and cultural values as expressed through the major art forms, including painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, music, dance, film and photography. The course will examine the elements and formal qualities that are characteristic of each art form, the relationships between the arts and the social and historical contexts from which they developed.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HUMA OR a broad base of HUMA credits (Architecture, Art, Art History, Dance, Film, Literature, Music, Theater)

FILM 101: Introduction to Film Studies

This class examines film as an art form, as a social practice and as a business. While focus will be on film as a narrative medium with its various genres and themes, this course will also explore documentary and experimental film from around the world, all as expressed through sound, editing, lighting, set design and other aspects of visual composition and cinematography.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in FILM

LITR 111: Introduction to Literature+

This course is a survey of the major literary genres (poetry, short stories, plays and novels) and involves the reading and discussion of representative works with the aim of providing competence in critical reading and analysis, as well as the knowledge of formal literary characteristics. As part of this analysis, students will situate each work within its historical, social and cultural context in order to gain a deeper understanding of its place within our world and the place from which they developed.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 24-25
  • Prerequisite: Completion of OR concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ENGL

MUSI 150: Music Appreciation

An introduction to music appreciation and theory for students who do not intend to major in music. This course is designed to provide familiarity with the elements of music and with various musical forms and stylistic periods so the students can actively and perceptively listen to a wide variety of music. The ability to read music is not required for enrollment.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in MUSI

RELI 215: Major World Religions

An introduction to comparative religious study, this course will examine the basic tenets, beliefs and practices of major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam using historical, psychological, sociological and phenomenological approaches.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in RELI

THEA 101: Introduction to Theater

This is an introductory course which focuses on drama as a performing art. Students will examine representative plays and study the historical, social, cultural, aesthetic and technical aspects of theatrical expression.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in THEA
Life & Physical Science

AGRI 120: Introduction to Horticulture

This course provides a general introduction to the principles of plant growth and development as they apply to the wide range of horticultural crops and the industries related to production, marketing and utilization of horticultural  crops.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in AGRI

BIOL 114: Contemporary Biology

This course will introduce students to a broad range of biological principles, including organization, structure and function, heredity, evolution and ecology. Students will demonstrate how their knowledge in biology is relevant to them, their community and their world. Students will use scientific evidence as the basis for their arguments. Students will improve their skills in relaying biological information to peers and to others. In addition, students will leave with a better understanding of scientific views that differ from their own. The laboratory component will emphasize scientific inquiry and use of knowledge in problem solving. This course is intended for students who are not pursuing a science career.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Life Science
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 092
    • OR placement at MATH 093 or higher
    • OR completion of a college-level math course
    • AND placement at college-level English
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in BIOL

EASC 101: Introduction to Geology

This is a study of the origin and types of earth materials and the processes at work in our physical environment. Topics include earthquakes, erosion, mountain building, minerals, rocks, volcanoes and glaciers. A two-hour lab each week will emphasize lecture material. Field trip required.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Capacity: 20
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EASC

EASC 111: Environment Earth

This is a course for non-science majors who desire a physical science understanding of environmental concerns. Topics may include: ground water, air quality, land management, nuclear energy and solid waste disposal. An optional lab (EASC 122) will apply physical science principles to lecture material.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 32
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EASC

EASC 122: Introduction to Earth Science Lab+

This is a beginning college-level laboratory science course that will present basic applications with problem-solving challenges and discovery methods in the physical sciences.

  • IAI Fulfillment: Physical Science Lab
  • Credit Hour: 1
  • Course Capacity: 20-25
  • Prerequisite: Completion of OR concurrent enrollment in EASC 111
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree  w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in EASC
Social & Behavioral Sciences

ANTH 102: Introduction to General Anthropology

This course provides an introductory survey of Anthropology and its subfields (cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeologyand linguistics). Students will study the nature of humans and their development in relationship to their physical and social environment today and in the past.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in ANTH

GEOG 101: World Geography

This course is a study of the interrelationships between contemporary world cultures and geographic structures and regions. The course includes a geographic perspective of human origins and distribution, population, migration, health, climate, culture, language, settlements, industry and agriculture.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in GEOG

HIST 101: Western Civilization to 1500

This course covers the main stream of Western civilization from the first millennium B.C. to 1500. The course considers religious, economic and cultural trends and developments as well as the major political events of the period. The focus of the course is on Europe but the great Middle Eastern civilizations and cultural contributions are considered as they impact Europe and help shape the West. Special attention is given to individuals and their contributions as well as to the rise of nations.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

HIST 102: Western Civilization Since 1500

This course covers the development of the modern West in terms of the great movements of the past five centuries: The Reformation, The Enlightenment, Absolutism and the rise of the nation state, the French Revolution, Industrialization, the emergence of modern political ideology, the World Wars, the Cold War and the roots of the present political situation. The course emphasizes watershed events in the realm of religion, politics, economics, artistic and cultural developments and war. Special attention is given to the contributions of individuals in shaping the modern world.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

HIST 135: History of the US to 1865

This course covers the major political, social, economic and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States from the early explorations of America to the Civil War and Reconstruction.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

HIST 136: History of the US Since 1865

This course covers the major political, social, economic and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in HIST

POS 101: American Government and Politics

This course introduces students to the structures and processes of American government and politics, to the exercise of power, and to value conflicts among key actors in the political process. The course also addresses some of the theoretical underpinnings of the study of American government such as democracy, pluralism and elitism. Finally, the course asks students to apply their learning to interpretations of current political events. Topics for study in the course include:political participation, interest groups, the Constitution, civil liberties, civil rights, the presidency, Congress, the federal court system, the media, political parties and elections.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in POS

PSY 101: Introduction to Psychology

This course provides an introduction to psychology as the scientific study of human and animal behavior with an emphasis on the factors that influence human behavior and mental processes. This course also focuses on how we may use knowledge and theories of physical and emotional/cognitive growth, learning, personality functioning and coping, and social interactions in our everyday lives.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/a minimum of 18 graduate hours in PSY

SOC 101: Sociology

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of society. Topics include the history of the discipline, culture, groups, organizations, bureaucracies, deviance, power and inequality, race/ethnicity, class, gender, education, the economy, the political institution, family, religion and social change. Students will develop a critical understanding of social forces.

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Capacity: 30
  • Instructor Qualifications: Master’s degree w/ a minimum of 18 graduate hours in SOC

Contact Person

For your administrative partnership process OR course selection inquiries:

Email Sarah Diel-Hunt, Ph.D.

Associate VP for Academic Affairs
Phone: 309-268-8593