Resource List on Curriculum

Bowman, B.T., Donovan, S. and Burns, M.S. (Eds.). (2000). Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers (page 235-240). Washington DC: The National Academies. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?isbn=0309068363

This report includes a research review and synthesis of the components of appropriate curriculum and assessment.

Bovey, T. & Strain, P. (2008, February). Using environmental strategies to promote positive social interactions (What Works Brief Training Kit #6). Tennessee: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning. Retrieved fromhttp://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/resources/training_kits.html

This training kit provides information for in-service training pertaining to establishing quality environments that support the social/emotional development of young children. Case studies are presented and strategies to adapt group composition, materials and activities are discussed. Training materials include a PowerPoint presentation, handouts, suggested activities and assessment tools.

Buysse, V., Winton, P., Rous, B., Epstein, D., and Cavanaugh, C. (2011). CONNECT Module 6: Dialogic Reading Practices. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, FPG Child Development Institute, CONNECT: The Center to Mobilize Early Childhood Knowledge Retrieved from http://community.fpg.unc.edu/connect-modules/learners/module-6

This web based training module provides information on the use of dialogic reading to enhance literacy skills in your children. Participants using the module will work through a case study to fully understand the concept.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (n.d.). CELL Videos. Get in step with responsive teaching [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/get_in_step_with_resp_teach.php

This 8 1/2-minute video discusses a technique called responsive teaching that parents and professionals can use to improve literacy skills in young children. Many video examples of the components of this technique are provided.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). CELL Videos. Getting Kids Involved: Creating Opportunities for Learning [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/getting_kids_involved.php

This 12-minute video provides information and illustrations for adapting literacy activities to maximize the participation of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers at home and in the classroom.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (n.d.). Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL). General Practice Guides for Practitioners.North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/pgpracts.php

This collection of guides provides information on activities, techniques and environments that develop literacy skills in infants, toddlers and preschool age. Some of the topics included are literacy-rich environments, alphabet and print awareness, pre- and emergent writing skills, listening and storytelling, phonemic awareness, and signing.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Action rhymes. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved fromhttp://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/toddler/PGPrac_T_ActRhym_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout discusses the use of action rhymes in the preschool classroom. The importance of adding actions to language for the development of phonological awareness is discussed. Sample action rhymes are provided.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Diaper Changing Games. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/infant/PGPrac_I_DiapChng_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout provides ideas for diaper changing games that adds an element of communicative learning to this frequent activity.

Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL). (n.d.). Early childhood classroom interests tool. North Carolina: Orleana Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/ta_pdf/ec_classrm_ints_tool.pdf (PDF)

This online tool provides means for assessing the interests of toddlers.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Fingerplays and rhymes with a punch. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/toddler/PGPrac_T_FingRhymPunch_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout discusses the use of fingerplays and rhymes to increase a preschooler's early language skills. Information on how to teach and incorporate this type of activity is included.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Literacy-Rich Experiences (Preschooler Practice Guides). North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/presch/p_group/lit_rich_p_grp.pdf(PDF)

This is a collection of three preschooler practice guides pertaining to creating environments that are literacy-rich. "A Place for Writing" discusses the use of a writing box in the preschool classroom as a way to encourage young children to write. "Keyboarding with Kids" discusses the appropriate use of computers with preschoolers. "Words Everywhere" encourages educators to create a print-rich environment as a way to stimulate literacy development in young children.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Mealtime Conversations. North Carolina: Orleana Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/infant/PGPrac_I_MealtimeConv_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout provides ideas for mealtime conversations that will add an element of communicative learning to this frequent activity.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). One for the books. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved fromhttp://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/presch/PGPrac_P_One4Bks_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout discusses the importance of word books in developing literacy skills. Ways to read word books to preschoolers are discussed. Ideas on how to make word books are also provided.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Read and repeat. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved fromhttp://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/presch/PGPrac_P_ReadRepeat_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout discusses the importance of repeated readings for young children, especially those with speech and language delays. The benefits gained from repeated readings are discussed. Strategies to employ when reading to young children are provided.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Reading together out loud. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/toddler/PGPrac_T_ReadTogeth_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout discusses the importance of reading aloud to young children. Ways to enrich this time reading together are provided. Strategies that incorporate "wh" questions and ways to actively engage the preschooler are discussed.

Center for Early Literacy Learning. (2010). Tales for Talking. North Carolina: Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute. Retrieved fromhttp://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpract_pract/presch/PGPrac_P_TalesTalk_WM.pdf (PDF)

This two-page handout discusses the skill of interactive reading. The benefits of this strategy are discussed and ways to incorporate this strategy into reading time are provided.

ChildrensScrapStore. (2009). Scrapstore Playpods in Action. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqi1KyJJeKg&feature=youtu.be

Video documenting the findings of a study on how children, when allowed access to a large collection of loose parts and provided extended uninterrupted time, improve their creativity, language skills and behavior. They also tend to include a more diverse group of children in their free play.

Copple, C., & Bredekamp, S. (Eds.). (2009). Developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood programs serving children from birth through age 8.. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children. Available fromhttp://www.naeyc.org/store/node/162

A 300+ page book that details current research surrounding developmentally appropriate practices for children through age 8. Discussion is broken down into the following age groups: 0-3 infant / toddler years, 3-5 preschool years, 5-6 kindergarten year, and 6-8 primary grade years. Topics within these age groups include physical development, social/emotional development, cognitive development, and language and literacy development.

Division for Early Childhood. (1999, October). Concept paper on identification of and intervention with challenging behavior.Montana: Author. Retrieved September 17, 2011 from http://www.cehd.umn.edu/ceed/events/summerinstitute/2008institute/2008pbsresources/articles/decconceptpaperonchallengingbehavior.pdf (PDF)

This position paper challenges professionals to look at challenging behaviors in light of cultural differences in expected behavior, a professionals own value system, and with regard to developmentally appropriate expectations. Ways to address challenging behaviors through supports and adaptations, classroom environments, and professional development are discussed. The importance of engaging the family in this process is also presented.

Division for Early Childhood. (2007). Promoting positive outcomes for children with disabilities: Recommendations for curriculum, assessment, and program evaluation. Retrieved from http://dec.membershipsoftware.org/files/Position%20Statement%20and%20Papers/Prmtg_Pos_Outcomes_Companion_Paper.pdf (PDF)

This paper is an extension to the 2003 joint position statement, Early Childhood Curriculum, Assessment, and Program Evaluation-Building an Effective, Accountable System in Programs for Children Birth Through Age 8. It provides key recommendations concerning curriculum design and implementation that supports all children, assessment tools and procedures, and how to assess the effectiveness of early childhood programs. Each topic area includes sections pertaining to key recommendations, indicators of effectiveness and frequently asked questions.

Head Start. (2012). I am Moving, I am Learning: A proactive approach for addressing childhood obesity in Head Start children. Retrieved from http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/center/healthy-active-living/imil/imil_report.pdf

This site provides information for Head Start and other practitioners on how to address obesity within early childhood programs. Information provided on the site includes how teachers can intentionally increase the amount and intensity of physical activity, improve the quality of movement activities, and promote healthy food choices every day.

Hill, C. and Campos, M. (2012). I am moving, I am learning: a proactive approach for addressing childhood obesity in Head Start Children [slide show]. Retrieved from http://caheadstart.org/2012HI/CHill.pdf (PDF)

This slide show introduces the Head Start initiative, “I am Moving, I am Learning.” Materials include the rationale for the program and the idea of “moderate to vigorous physical activity” (MVPA) to improve brain function as well as overall body health.

Hillman, C.B. (2012). The intangibles in the early childhood classroomm. Foundations for Children, March/April 2012. Retrieved from https://ccie-catalog.s3.amazonaws.com/library/5020412.pdf (PDF)

This article from www.ChildCareExchange.com addresses the important overarching goals that teachers have for young children to develop healthy habits and attitudes towards learning and being a part of a learning community.

Illinois Early Learning Project. (n.d.). Questions: Ask Dr. Katz - Archive Question 55. Retrieved fromhttp://illinoisearlylearning.org/ask-dr-katz/question005.htm

This link from the Illinois Early Learning Project provides access to an archive of previously asked questions about early care and education in general and the Project Approach. Dr. Lilian Katz, a world-renowned expert in the field of early childhood education, responds to the questions.

Illinois State Board of Education: Division of Early Childhood Education. (2013). Illinois Early Learning Project. Illinois early learning benchmark videos. Retrieved from http://illinoisearlylearning.org/videos/index.htm

This site helps teach the Illinois Early Learning Standards by providing links to 39 video clips of activities appropriate for young children. It also includes information on the Illinois Early Learning Standards that are addressed in each activity.

Illinois State Board of Education: Division of Early Childhood Education. (2013). Illinois Early Learning Guidelines for Children Birth to Age 3.. Retrieved from http://www.isbe.net/earlychi/pdf/el-guidelines-0-3.pdf

Developed by the Illinois State Board of Education, these guidelines provide information on expected child development from birth to age 3. The guidelines are broken down into four developmental domains: Social and Emotional Development; Physical Development and Health; Language Development, Communication and Literacy; and Cognitive Development.

Illinois State Board of Education: Division of Early Childhood Education. (2013). Illinois Early Learning Project. Illinois early learning standards. Retrieved from http://illinoisearlylearning.org/standards/index.htm

Standards developed by the Illinois State Board of Education that outline benchmarks for learning in the following areas: language arts, mathematics, science, social science, physical development and health, fine arts, foreign languages, and social/emotional development.

Illinois State Board of Education: Division of Early Childhood Education. (2013). Illinois Early Learning Project. Illinois early learning standards – Guiding principles. Retrieved from http://illinoisearlylearning.org/standards/guideprin.htm

This brief narrative on the Illinois Early Learning Project web site introduces the Illinois Early Learning Standards.

IRIS Center. (n.d.). Star Legacy Modules. Universal design for learning: Creating a learning environment that challenges and engages all students. Retrieved from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/udl/chalcycle.htm

This learning module presents the challenges faced by schools as they address the needs of an increasingly diverse student body that includes students with disabilities, students that are struggling academically, students who are not challenged and students who are hard to engage. Using Wilbur Middle School as a case study, strategies are shared on how to implement the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in order to create a classroom environment that addresses all of these needs.

Kaiser, A. P. (2011, February). KidTalk: Naturalistic communication intervention strategies for parents and teachers of young children. AUCD Webinar February 22, 2011. Vanderbilt University, Department of Special Education. Retrieved fromhttp://kc.vanderbilt.edu/kidtalk/files/presentations/Kaiser_AUCD Webinar_2_22_11.pdf (PDF)

This archived webinar introduces the Communication Intervention of Enhanced Milieu Teaching, a naturalistic, conversation-based intervention that uses child interests and initiations as opportunities to model and prompt language in everyday contexts.

McWilliam, R.A., & Casey, A.M. (2007). Engagement of every child in the preschool classroom. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes. Available from http://products.brookespublishing.com/Engagement-of-Every-Child-in-the-Preschool-Classroom-P205.aspx

This 192-page book focuses on ways to increase the classroom engagement of preschool children. Strategies discussed include modifying the classroom environment, developing student supports, and monitoring functional goals. Particular attention is given to improving student engagement throughout the classroom as well as ways to increase the engagement of individual children. Ways to measure and record engagement are also provided.

Milbourne, S.A. and Campbell, P.H. (n.d.). CARA’s kit: Creating adaptations for routines and activities. Philadelphia, PA: Child and Family Studies Research Programs. Thomas Jefferson University. Available from http://www.naeyc.org/store/node/666

Kit provides a CD with presentations and handouts as well as an interactive booklet about creating adaptations to daily activities and routines for preschool children. The goal of the material is to promote a child’s full participation in early childhood settings.

National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2003). Early childhood curriculum, assessment, and program evaluation: Building an effective, accountable system in programs for children birth through age 8. Retrieved fromhttp://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/CAPEexpand.pdf (PDF)

This position statement provides an evaluation of, recommendations for, and additional resources to the 2003 Joint Position Statement of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education (NAECS/SDE). Information focusing on curriculum, assessment, and program evaluation is put into a historical context and recommendations are provided for each area.

National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2009). Position Statement on Developmentally Appropriate Practices.Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/position%20statement%20Web.pdf(PDF)

This position statement outlines the importance of developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood. First published in 1986 and then periodically revised, this paper provides a framework, based on research, for exemplary practices in early childhood.

National Association for the Education of Young Children. Teaching Young Children. (n.d.). Developmentally Appropriate Practice and Play Video. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/tyc/next/video/dap

This 12:45 minute video explores how play is a critical element in a child’s development. Topics discussed in the video include the characteristics of play and how the teacher can support it.

National Association for the Education of Young Children and Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media at Saint Vincent College. (2012). Joint Position Statement on Technology and Interactive Media.. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/content/technology-and-young-children

This position statement outlines the issues surrounding technology and young children and how to appropriately integrate it into early childhood classrooms. Multiple principles are provided to guide the use of technology with children birth to age 8.

National Association for the Education of Young Children and Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media at Saint Vincent College. (2012). Selected Examples of Effective Classroom Practice Involving Technology Tools and Interactive Media. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/PS_technology_Examples.pdf (PDF)

This easy to use chart is divided by age groups and provides examples of appropriate uses of technology tools and interactive media for each grouping.

National Association for the Education of Young Children and Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media at Saint Vincent College. (2012). Technology and Interactive Media as Tools in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/PS_technology_WEB.pdf (PDF)

This 15-page position statement addresses the issues and concerns with using technology and interactive media with young children. The conclusion is made that distinctions need to be made so that usage is limited to intentional use by early childhood educators, within the framework of developmentally appropriate practice.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education (NAECS/SDE). (2009). Where We Stand on Curriculum, Assessment, and Program Evaluation.Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/StandCurrAss.pdf (PDF)

This joint position statement from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education (NAECS/SDE) addresses what and how children should be taught from birth through age 8. It also outlines appropriate assessment practices.

Nemeth, K.N. (2009). Many languages, one classroom: Teaching dual and English language learners... Silver Springs: Gryphon House. Available from http://www.gryphonhouse.com/store/trans/productDetailForm.asp?BookID=14399

This 96-page book provides teachers with ideas on how to address the needs of English language learners in the preschool classroom. Based on the latest research and developmentally appropriate practices, the author provides numerous strategies to support literacy and language development in the preschool classroom.

Neuman, S., Copple, C., and Bedekamp, S. (2000). Learning to read and write: Developmentally appropriate practices for young children. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children. Available fromhttp://www.naeyc.org/store/node/40

This 131-page book focuses on encouraging literacy in the classroom through the use of developmentally appropriate practices. Developmental resources are provided along with numerous ideas that can be implemented in the preschool or kindergarten classroom.

Palacios, R. (n.d.). Colorin Colorado. Preschool for English language learners: Language learning and assessmentt [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.colorincolorado.org/webcasts/preschool/

This is part one of a four-part web series that focuses on how young English language learners develop the language skills they need to be successful in the classroom. How quality preschool settings support ELLs and the various models available for ELL classrooms is discussed. Ways to help children develop skills to listen, speak, read and write as well as how to build partnerships with families are shared. How to use peer supports and activities to build language skills through learning centers are also discussed. Types and uses of formal and informal assessments are explored.

Palacios, R. (n.d.). Colorin Colorado. Preschool for English language learners: Academic skills [Video file]. Retrieved fromhttp://www.colorincolorado.org/webcasts/preschool/

This is part two of a four-part web series that focuses on how young English language learners develop academic skills in a preschool classroom. Discussions include the types of curriculum necessary for a successful ELL classroom, what skills need to be in place for future success in the kindergarten classroom, and how to support language development through social interactions. Specific examples are provided on ways to support ELL students through the various curricular components of literacy, math, science, technology, music, and play.

Purcell, T. (2007). Differentiating instruction in the preschool classroom: Bridging emergent literacy instruction and developmentally appropriate practice. Retrieved fromhttp://www.stcloudstate.edu/tpi/teachersupport/documents/DifferentiatingInstruction-EarlyChildhood.pdf (PDF)

The article defines differentiated instruction for preschool aged children and clearly explains how the method is based on assessment. The author advocates differentiated instructions specific use in literacy instruction.

Sandall, S., Hemmeter, M.L., Smith, B.J., & McLean, M.E. (2005). DEC recommended practices: A comprehensive guide for practical application in early intervention/early childhood special education. Longmont, CO: Sopris West. Available fromhttp://www.naeyc.org/store/node/68222

This 305-page book discusses, in depth, developmentally appropriate practices for children with special needs. Based on research and experience, the authors provide multiple examples and helpful information for professionals, administrators and parents. Also included is a comprehensive annotated bibliography.

Smallwood, B.A., & Haynes, E.F. (2008). Singable books: Sing and read your way to English proficiency. Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics. Retrieved from http://www.cal.org/resources/digest/singable.html

This report discusses the use of books with singable words as a way to develop literacy skills in young English language learners. The research supporting the use of singable books is summarized. Also included are the benefits of this practice and how to select books. A list of recommended singable books is provided.

University of Illinois College of Education. (2012). Illinois projects in practice. Illinois: Author. Retrieved from http://illinoispip.org/

The Illinois PIP site provides support, resources, and information for anyone interested in the Project Approach for preschool children. There are links to examples of projects in Illinois classrooms to help guide those in wanting to implement the Project Approach.

Winston, P.J., Buysse, V., Turnbull, A., Rouse, B., and Hollingsworth, H. (2010). CONNECT Module 1: Embedded interventions.[Web-based professional development curriculum]. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, FPG Child Development Institute, CONNECT: The Center to Mobilize Early Childhood Knowledge. Retrieved from http://community.fpg.unc.edu/connect-modules/learners/module-1

This web-based training module provides information about how to use embedded interventions to support children in inclusive settings. Learn more about what inclusive settings look like and how embedded interventions help children succeed in this environment. Participants using the module will work through a case study to fully understand these concepts.

Winton, P., Buysse, V., Rous, B., Epstein, D., and Pierce, P. (2011). CONNECT Module 5: Assistive Technology Interventions [Web-based professional development curriculum]. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, FPG Child Development Institute, CONNECT: The Center to Mobilize Early Childhood Knowledge. Retrieved from http://community.fpg.unc.edu/connect-modules/learners/module-5

This web-based training provides videos, activities, and narratives about the purpose, use, and potential benefits of using assistive technology for children with disabilities.

Contact Us

Johnna Darragh-Ernst

Professor Early Childhood Education

1500 W Raab Road
Normal, IL 61761
Phone: 309-268-8746

Email: johnna.darragh@heartland.edu